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February 29, 2016

Lk 4: 24-30

And he said, “Truly I tell you, no prophet is accepted in the prophet’s hometown. But the truth is, there were many widows in Israel in the time of Elijah, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, and there was a severe famine over all the land; yet Elijah was sent to none of them except to a widow at Zarephath in Sidon. There were also many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet Elisha, and none of them was cleansed except Naaman the Syrian.” When they heard this, all in the synagogue were filled with rage. They got up, drove him out of the town, and led him to the brow of the hill on which their town was built, so that they might hurl him off the cliff. But he passed through the midst of them and went on his way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Seeking Jesus

For many years this Gospel was difficult for me to relate to. It is rare that I have been furious in my life. It has happened however that a disappointment turned to anger, that anger into fury. Just like these Nazoreans I was unable to see the reality of what was really happening right in front of me.

Blinded by anger. Spiraling out of control. Emotions can be that way. When we are emotional it is challenging to step back and open up. In this story Jesus is offering an invitation to discipleship. In this time of Lent he invites us to open our hearts to the invitation to seek him and his love. Jesus reminds us he is in our midst waiting for our “yes.” Can you seek him today not only in prayer but in the world around you?

—Erin Maiorca serves as associate director of Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House, Barrington, IL.

Prayer

Merciful God,
in whom we live and move and have our being,
your face is hidden from us by our sins.
We forget your mercy in the blindness of our hearts.
Cleanse me from my failings.
Deliver me from proud thoughts and vain desires.
With lowliness and weakness may I draw near to you,
confessing my faults, confiding in your grace.
Merciful God, through Jesus, your son,
be my refuge and my strength now and always.  Amen.
—The Jesuit prayer team

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Seeking Jesus

For many years this Gospel was difficult for me to relate to. It is rare that I have been furious in my life. It has happened however that a disappointment turned to anger, that anger into fury. Just like these Nazoreans I was unable to see the reality of what was really happening right in front of me.

Blinded by anger. Spiraling out of control. Emotions can be that way. When we are emotional it is challenging to step back and open up. In this story Jesus is offering an invitation to discipleship. In this time of Lent he invites us to open our hearts to the invitation to seek him and his love. Jesus reminds us he is in our midst waiting for our “yes.” Can you seek him today not only in prayer but in the world around you?

—Erin Maiorca serves as associate director of Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House, Barrington, IL.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Lk 4: 24-30

And he said, “Truly I tell you, no prophet is accepted in the prophet’s hometown. But the truth is, there were many widows in Israel in the time of Elijah, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, and there was a severe famine over all the land; yet Elijah was sent to none of them except to a widow at Zarephath in Sidon. There were also many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet Elisha, and none of them was cleansed except Naaman the Syrian.” When they heard this, all in the synagogue were filled with rage. They got up, drove him out of the town, and led him to the brow of the hill on which their town was built, so that they might hurl him off the cliff. But he passed through the midst of them and went on his way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Merciful God,
in whom we live and move and have our being,
your face is hidden from us by our sins.
We forget your mercy in the blindness of our hearts.
Cleanse me from my failings.
Deliver me from proud thoughts and vain desires.
With lowliness and weakness may I draw near to you,
confessing my faults, confiding in your grace.
Merciful God, through Jesus, your son,
be my refuge and my strength now and always.  Amen.
—The Jesuit prayer team

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


February 28, 2016

Lk 13: 1-9

At that very time there were some present who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. He asked them, “Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were worse sinners than all other Galileans? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish as they did. Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish just as they did.”

Then he told this parable: “A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and found none. So he said to the gardener, ‘See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?’ He replied, ‘Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig around it and put manure on it. If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Second Chances

In one of the most significant Gospels of Lent, Jesus offers us an insight into our relationship with God and a further understanding of how and why people undergo evil. Rather than seeing human suffering as simply a punishment for sin, Jesus instead tells a story about second chances. Jesus ask whether some Galileans, put to death by Pontius Pilate were more guilty of sin than other Galileans. And Jesus answers his own questions by saying, “No.” Then Jesus considers the case of people who were killed in the collapse of a building. Was God punishing them for some transgression? Jesus once again affirms that their deaths had nothing to do with sin or punishment by God for sinfulness of some sort.

And then Jesus tells a parable about a fig tree that produces no fruit. The master of the house wants to cut it down, but the gardener suggests that it should be fertilized and given special treatment just one more season, and then – if there is still no fruit – then the owner can carry out his will. Should we conclude that Jesus sees himself as the gardener, asking the master for just one more chance for the tree? Or is it God himself who offers all of us second chances?  

—Fr. Michael A. Vincent, S.J. serves as associate pastor of the Church of the Gesu, University Heights, OH.

Prayer

Holy God, Jesus calls us to repentance and a change of heart during these days of Lent.
Open our hearts to the voice of your Word. Give light and life to our attitudes and actions. Amen.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Holy God, Jesus calls us to repentance and a change of heart during these days of Lent.
Open our hearts to the voice of your Word. Give light and life to our attitudes and actions. Amen.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Second Chances

In one of the most significant Gospels of Lent, Jesus offers us an insight into our relationship with God and a further understanding of how and why people undergo evil. Rather than seeing human suffering as simply a punishment for sin, Jesus instead tells a story about second chances. Jesus ask whether some Galileans, put to death by Pontius Pilate were more guilty of sin than other Galileans. And Jesus answers his own questions by saying, “No.” Then Jesus considers the case of people who were killed in the collapse of a building. Was God punishing them for some transgression? Jesus once again affirms that their deaths had nothing to do with sin or punishment by God for sinfulness of some sort.

And then Jesus tells a parable about a fig tree that produces no fruit. The master of the house wants to cut it down, but the gardener suggests that it should be fertilized and given special treatment just one more season, and then – if there is still no fruit – then the owner can carry out his will. Should we conclude that Jesus sees himself as the gardener, asking the master for just one more chance for the tree? Or is it God himself who offers all of us second chances?  

—Fr. Michael A. Vincent, S.J. serves as associate pastor of the Church of the Gesu, University Heights, OH.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Lk 13: 1-9

At that very time there were some present who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. He asked them, “Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were worse sinners than all other Galileans? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish as they did. Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish just as they did.”

Then he told this parable: “A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and found none. So he said to the gardener, ‘See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?’ He replied, ‘Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig around it and put manure on it. If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


February 27, 2016

Lk 15: 1-3. 11-32

Now all the tax collectors and sinners were coming near to listen to him. And the Pharisees and the scribes were grumbling and saying, “This fellow welcomes sinners and eats with them.” So he told them this parable:

Then Jesus said, “There was a man who had two sons. The younger of them said to his father, ‘Father, give me the share of the property that will belong to me.’ So he divided his property between them. A few days later the younger son gathered all he had and traveled to a distant country, and there he squandered his property in dissolute living. When he had spent everything, a severe famine took place throughout that country, and he began to be in need. So he went and hired himself out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed the pigs. He would gladly have filled himself with the pods that the pigs were eating; and no one gave him anything.

But when he came to himself he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired hands have bread enough and to spare, but here I am dying of hunger! I will get up and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son; treat me like one of your hired hands.”’ So he set off and went to his father. But while he was still far off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion; he ran and put his arms around him and kissed him.

Then the son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’ But the father said to his slaves, ‘Quickly, bring out a robe—the best one—and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. And get the fatted calf and kill it, and let us eat and celebrate; for this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found!’ And they began to celebrate.

“Now his elder son was in the field; and when he came and approached the house, he heard music and dancing. He called one of the slaves and asked what was going on. He replied, ‘Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fatted calf, because he has got him back safe and sound.’ Then he became angry and refused to go in. His father came out and began to plead with him. But he answered his father, ‘Listen! For all these years I have been working like a slave for you, and I have never disobeyed your command; yet you have never given me even a young goat so that I might celebrate with my friends. But when this son of yours came back, who has devoured your property with prostitutes, you killed the fatted calf for him!’

Then the father said to him, ‘Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. But we had to celebrate and rejoice, because this brother of yours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Digging Deep

When considering a particular gospel passage, Ignatius Loyola invites us to place ourselves within the situation and frame of mind/heart of the gospel person we find there. So, in today’s very familiar passage, what happens if any of us places ourselves in the mind/heart of the parent … or the prodigal child … or the faithful child back home? How do things look like through the eyes of the parent, or in the heart of the prodigal? What do the servants experience? What takes place during the feast at which the fatted calf is served? And what is going on behind the scenes? What is the back talk?

After considering any of these viewpoints, St. Ignatius invites our personal reflection: todayFeb. 27, 2016
What jumps out in my own heart as I consider this story? Where am I attracted? Where am I put off? How am I drawn to the Lord this weekend? What does Jesus ask and invite these early days of Lent? How might I act differently today with those I live with, those I meet, those I love?

—The Jesuit prayer team

Prayer

O God, I am so fragile;
    my dreams get broken
    my relationships get broken
    my heart gets broken…

What can I believe
except what Jesus taught:
that only what is first broken,
    like bread,
can be shared;
only what is broken
is open to your entry.

So I believe, Lord;
    help my unbelief
    that I may have courage
    to keep trying,
    even when I am tired.
Amen.

—Written by a student while on retreat

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

O God, I am so fragile;
    my dreams get broken
    my relationships get broken
    my heart gets broken…

What can I believe
except what Jesus taught:
that only what is first broken,
    like bread,
can be shared;
only what is broken
is open to your entry.

So I believe, Lord;
    help my unbelief
    that I may have courage
    to keep trying,
    even when I am tired.
Amen.

—Written by a student while on retreat

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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February 29, 2016

Lk 4: 24-30

And he said, “Truly I tell you, no prophet is accepted in the prophet’s hometown. But the truth is, there were many widows in Israel in the time of Elijah, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, and there was a severe famine over all the land; yet Elijah was sent to none of them except to a widow at Zarephath in Sidon. There were also many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet Elisha, and none of them was cleansed except Naaman the Syrian.” When they heard this, all in the synagogue were filled with rage. They got up, drove him out of the town, and led him to the brow of the hill on which their town was built, so that they might hurl him off the cliff. But he passed through the midst of them and went on his way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Seeking Jesus

For many years this Gospel was difficult for me to relate to. It is rare that I have been furious in my life. It has happened however that a disappointment turned to anger, that anger into fury. Just like these Nazoreans I was unable to see the reality of what was really happening right in front of me.

Blinded by anger. Spiraling out of control. Emotions can be that way. When we are emotional it is challenging to step back and open up. In this story Jesus is offering an invitation to discipleship. In this time of Lent he invites us to open our hearts to the invitation to seek him and his love. Jesus reminds us he is in our midst waiting for our “yes.” Can you seek him today not only in prayer but in the world around you?

—Erin Maiorca serves as associate director of Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House, Barrington, IL.

Prayer

Merciful God,
in whom we live and move and have our being,
your face is hidden from us by our sins.
We forget your mercy in the blindness of our hearts.
Cleanse me from my failings.
Deliver me from proud thoughts and vain desires.
With lowliness and weakness may I draw near to you,
confessing my faults, confiding in your grace.
Merciful God, through Jesus, your son,
be my refuge and my strength now and always.  Amen.
—The Jesuit prayer team

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Seeking Jesus

For many years this Gospel was difficult for me to relate to. It is rare that I have been furious in my life. It has happened however that a disappointment turned to anger, that anger into fury. Just like these Nazoreans I was unable to see the reality of what was really happening right in front of me.

Blinded by anger. Spiraling out of control. Emotions can be that way. When we are emotional it is challenging to step back and open up. In this story Jesus is offering an invitation to discipleship. In this time of Lent he invites us to open our hearts to the invitation to seek him and his love. Jesus reminds us he is in our midst waiting for our “yes.” Can you seek him today not only in prayer but in the world around you?

—Erin Maiorca serves as associate director of Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House, Barrington, IL.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Lk 4: 24-30

And he said, “Truly I tell you, no prophet is accepted in the prophet’s hometown. But the truth is, there were many widows in Israel in the time of Elijah, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, and there was a severe famine over all the land; yet Elijah was sent to none of them except to a widow at Zarephath in Sidon. There were also many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet Elisha, and none of them was cleansed except Naaman the Syrian.” When they heard this, all in the synagogue were filled with rage. They got up, drove him out of the town, and led him to the brow of the hill on which their town was built, so that they might hurl him off the cliff. But he passed through the midst of them and went on his way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Merciful God,
in whom we live and move and have our being,
your face is hidden from us by our sins.
We forget your mercy in the blindness of our hearts.
Cleanse me from my failings.
Deliver me from proud thoughts and vain desires.
With lowliness and weakness may I draw near to you,
confessing my faults, confiding in your grace.
Merciful God, through Jesus, your son,
be my refuge and my strength now and always.  Amen.
—The Jesuit prayer team

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


February 28, 2016

Lk 13: 1-9

At that very time there were some present who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. He asked them, “Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were worse sinners than all other Galileans? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish as they did. Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish just as they did.”

Then he told this parable: “A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and found none. So he said to the gardener, ‘See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?’ He replied, ‘Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig around it and put manure on it. If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Second Chances

In one of the most significant Gospels of Lent, Jesus offers us an insight into our relationship with God and a further understanding of how and why people undergo evil. Rather than seeing human suffering as simply a punishment for sin, Jesus instead tells a story about second chances. Jesus ask whether some Galileans, put to death by Pontius Pilate were more guilty of sin than other Galileans. And Jesus answers his own questions by saying, “No.” Then Jesus considers the case of people who were killed in the collapse of a building. Was God punishing them for some transgression? Jesus once again affirms that their deaths had nothing to do with sin or punishment by God for sinfulness of some sort.

And then Jesus tells a parable about a fig tree that produces no fruit. The master of the house wants to cut it down, but the gardener suggests that it should be fertilized and given special treatment just one more season, and then – if there is still no fruit – then the owner can carry out his will. Should we conclude that Jesus sees himself as the gardener, asking the master for just one more chance for the tree? Or is it God himself who offers all of us second chances?  

—Fr. Michael A. Vincent, S.J. serves as associate pastor of the Church of the Gesu, University Heights, OH.

Prayer

Holy God, Jesus calls us to repentance and a change of heart during these days of Lent.
Open our hearts to the voice of your Word. Give light and life to our attitudes and actions. Amen.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Holy God, Jesus calls us to repentance and a change of heart during these days of Lent.
Open our hearts to the voice of your Word. Give light and life to our attitudes and actions. Amen.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Second Chances

In one of the most significant Gospels of Lent, Jesus offers us an insight into our relationship with God and a further understanding of how and why people undergo evil. Rather than seeing human suffering as simply a punishment for sin, Jesus instead tells a story about second chances. Jesus ask whether some Galileans, put to death by Pontius Pilate were more guilty of sin than other Galileans. And Jesus answers his own questions by saying, “No.” Then Jesus considers the case of people who were killed in the collapse of a building. Was God punishing them for some transgression? Jesus once again affirms that their deaths had nothing to do with sin or punishment by God for sinfulness of some sort.

And then Jesus tells a parable about a fig tree that produces no fruit. The master of the house wants to cut it down, but the gardener suggests that it should be fertilized and given special treatment just one more season, and then – if there is still no fruit – then the owner can carry out his will. Should we conclude that Jesus sees himself as the gardener, asking the master for just one more chance for the tree? Or is it God himself who offers all of us second chances?  

—Fr. Michael A. Vincent, S.J. serves as associate pastor of the Church of the Gesu, University Heights, OH.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Lk 13: 1-9

At that very time there were some present who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. He asked them, “Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were worse sinners than all other Galileans? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish as they did. Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish just as they did.”

Then he told this parable: “A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and found none. So he said to the gardener, ‘See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?’ He replied, ‘Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig around it and put manure on it. If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


February 27, 2016

Lk 15: 1-3. 11-32

Now all the tax collectors and sinners were coming near to listen to him. And the Pharisees and the scribes were grumbling and saying, “This fellow welcomes sinners and eats with them.” So he told them this parable:

Then Jesus said, “There was a man who had two sons. The younger of them said to his father, ‘Father, give me the share of the property that will belong to me.’ So he divided his property between them. A few days later the younger son gathered all he had and traveled to a distant country, and there he squandered his property in dissolute living. When he had spent everything, a severe famine took place throughout that country, and he began to be in need. So he went and hired himself out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed the pigs. He would gladly have filled himself with the pods that the pigs were eating; and no one gave him anything.

But when he came to himself he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired hands have bread enough and to spare, but here I am dying of hunger! I will get up and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son; treat me like one of your hired hands.”’ So he set off and went to his father. But while he was still far off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion; he ran and put his arms around him and kissed him.

Then the son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’ But the father said to his slaves, ‘Quickly, bring out a robe—the best one—and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. And get the fatted calf and kill it, and let us eat and celebrate; for this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found!’ And they began to celebrate.

“Now his elder son was in the field; and when he came and approached the house, he heard music and dancing. He called one of the slaves and asked what was going on. He replied, ‘Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fatted calf, because he has got him back safe and sound.’ Then he became angry and refused to go in. His father came out and began to plead with him. But he answered his father, ‘Listen! For all these years I have been working like a slave for you, and I have never disobeyed your command; yet you have never given me even a young goat so that I might celebrate with my friends. But when this son of yours came back, who has devoured your property with prostitutes, you killed the fatted calf for him!’

Then the father said to him, ‘Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. But we had to celebrate and rejoice, because this brother of yours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found.’”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Digging Deep

When considering a particular gospel passage, Ignatius Loyola invites us to place ourselves within the situation and frame of mind/heart of the gospel person we find there. So, in today’s very familiar passage, what happens if any of us places ourselves in the mind/heart of the parent … or the prodigal child … or the faithful child back home? How do things look like through the eyes of the parent, or in the heart of the prodigal? What do the servants experience? What takes place during the feast at which the fatted calf is served? And what is going on behind the scenes? What is the back talk?

After considering any of these viewpoints, St. Ignatius invites our personal reflection: todayFeb. 27, 2016
What jumps out in my own heart as I consider this story? Where am I attracted? Where am I put off? How am I drawn to the Lord this weekend? What does Jesus ask and invite these early days of Lent? How might I act differently today with those I live with, those I meet, those I love?

—The Jesuit prayer team

Prayer

O God, I am so fragile;
    my dreams get broken
    my relationships get broken
    my heart gets broken…

What can I believe
except what Jesus taught:
that only what is first broken,
    like bread,
can be shared;
only what is broken
is open to your entry.

So I believe, Lord;
    help my unbelief
    that I may have courage
    to keep trying,
    even when I am tired.
Amen.

—Written by a student while on retreat

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

O God, I am so fragile;
    my dreams get broken
    my relationships get broken
    my heart gets broken…

What can I believe
except what Jesus taught:
that only what is first broken,
    like bread,
can be shared;
only what is broken
is open to your entry.

So I believe, Lord;
    help my unbelief
    that I may have courage
    to keep trying,
    even when I am tired.
Amen.

—Written by a student while on retreat

Please share the Good Word with your friends!