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July 31, 2016

Feast of St. Ignatius of Loyola

Lk 12: 13-21

Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family inheritance with me.” But he said to him, “Friend, who set me to be a judge or arbitrator over you?” And he said to them, “Take care! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed; for one’s life does not consist in the abundance of possessions.”

Then he told them a parable: “The land of a rich man produced abundantly. And he thought to himself, ‘What should I do, for I have no place to store my crops?’ Then he said, ‘I will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, ‘Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’

But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Choose Life

A Jesuit in India, Fr. Hedwig Lewis, S.J., shares the following story which brings to life our daily struggle to choose life: A wise old man once imparted this lesson about life to his grandson.

“A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy. “It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil—he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.”

He continued, “The other is good—he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, benevolence, empathy, truth, compassion and faith. The same fight is going on inside you—and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?”

The old man replied,“The one you feed.”

(From “In Good Company:  Information and Insights for Jesuit Collaborators,” Gujarat Sahitya Prakash, Gujarat India, 2016, p. 37)

**********

On this the feast of St. Ignatius Loyola, let us do our best to feed “the good wolf “ inside of our hearts!

—Fr. Brian Paulson, S.J. serves as Provincial for Jesuits of the Chicago-Detroit province of the Society of Jesus.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, you invite me to be your companion in the footsteps of St. Ignatius.
Help me to feel with your heart, to see with your eyes, to touch with your hands.
May your very heartbeat in mine. Fill me with your good and Holy Spirit.  
As I make choices each day, give me the grace to choose life—your life—
so that your kingdom might be a little bit more visible in our world.

—Father Paulson

Please share the Good Word with your friends!



Prayer

Lord Jesus, you invite me to be your companion in the footsteps of St. Ignatius.
Help me to feel with your heart, to see with your eyes, to touch with your hands.
May your very heartbeat in mine. Fill me with your good and Holy Spirit.  
As I make choices each day, give me the grace to choose life—your life—
so that your kingdom might be a little bit more visible in our world.

—Father Paulson

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Choose Life

A Jesuit in India, Fr. Hedwig Lewis, S.J., shares the following story which brings to life our daily struggle to choose life: A wise old man once imparted this lesson about life to his grandson.

“A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy. “It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil—he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.”  

He continued, “The other is good—he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, benevolence, empathy, truth, compassion and faith. The same fight is going on inside you—and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?”

The old man replied,“The one you feed.”

(From “In Good Company:  Information and Insights for Jesuit Collaborators,” Gujarat Sahitya Prakash, Gujarat India, 2016, p. 37)

**********

On this the feast of St. Ignatius Loyola, let us do our best to feed “the good wolf “ inside of our hearts!

—Fr. Brian Paulson, S.J. serves as Provincial for Jesuits of the Chicago-Detroit province of the Society of Jesus.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Feast of St. Ignatius of Loyola

Lk 12: 13-21

Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family inheritance with me.” But he said to him, “Friend, who set me to be a judge or arbitrator over you?” And he said to them, “Take care! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed; for one’s life does not consist in the abundance of possessions.”

Then he told them a parable: “The land of a rich man produced abundantly. And he thought to himself, ‘What should I do, for I have no place to store my crops?’ Then he said, ‘I will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, ‘Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’

But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


July 30, 2016

Mt 14: 1-12

At that time Herod the ruler heard reports about Jesus; and he said to his servants, “This is John the Baptist; he has been raised from the dead, and for this reason these powers are at work in him.” For Herod had arrested John, bound him, and put him in prison on account of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because John had been telling him, “It is not lawful for you to have her.” Though Herod wanted to put him to death, he feared the crowd, because they regarded him as a prophet.

But when Herod’s birthday came, the daughter of Herodias danced before the company, and she pleased Herod so much that he promised on oath to grant her whatever she might ask. Prompted by her mother, she said, “Give me the head of John the Baptist here on a platter.” The king was grieved, yet out of regard for his oaths and for the guests, he commanded it to be given; he sent and had John beheaded in the prison. The head was brought on a platter and given to the girl, who brought it to her mother. His disciples came and took the body and buried it; then they went and told Jesus.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Pilgrimage with Jesus

The violence described in the gospel today is as horrific as what we see in our world. It is difficult, at best, to make any sense of it, and yet not nearly as foreign an experience as one would wish. In the face of this unjust violence, the disciples take a very simple action; they walk to Jesus to share the news with him.

Their care for him gave them purpose in a moment that should have led to despair. Their strength comes with going to Jesus to share news that is important to them (and him). They find their hope in him, as do the millions who have assembled in Krakow, Poland in his name.

The disciples took a pilgrimage to Jesus; World Youth Day has been a pilgrimage for Jesus; and each of our lives is a pilgrimage with Jesus. Today, as we walk along our individual journeys, we can pray the prayer of WYD 2016. A prayer of pilgrimage, for in Jesus we can find the strength to persevere no matter what hindrances may come.   

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

God, merciful Father,
in your Son, Jesus Christ, you have revealed your love
and poured it out upon us in the Holy Spirit, the Comforter,
We entrust to you today the destiny of the world and of every man and woman”.
We entrust to you in a special way
young people of every language, people and nation:
guide and protect them as they walk the complex paths of the world today
and give them the grace to reap abundant fruits
from their experience of the Krakow World Youth Day.

Heavenly Father,
grant that we may bear witness to your mercy.
Teach us how to convey the faith to those in doubt,
hope to those who are discouraged,
love to those who feel indifferent,
forgiveness to those who have done wrong
and joy to those who are unhappy.

Allow the spark of merciful love
that you have enkindled within us
become a fire that can transform hearts
and renew the face of the earth.

Mary, Mother of Mercy, pray for us.
Saint John Paul II, pray for us.
Saint Faustina, pray for us.

Official Pilgrim Prayer: World Youth Day—Krakow 2016

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God, merciful Father,
in your Son, Jesus Christ, you have revealed your love
and poured it out upon us in the Holy Spirit, the Comforter,
We entrust to you today the destiny of the world and of every man and woman”.
We entrust to you in a special way
young people of every language, people and nation:
guide and protect them as they walk the complex paths of the world today
and give them the grace to reap abundant fruits
from their experience of the Krakow World Youth Day.

Heavenly Father,
grant that we may bear witness to your mercy.
Teach us how to convey the faith to those in doubt,
hope to those who are discouraged,
love to those who feel indifferent,
forgiveness to those who have done wrong
and joy to those who are unhappy.

Allow the spark of merciful love
that you have enkindled within us
become a fire that can transform hearts
and renew the face of the earth.

Mary, Mother of Mercy, pray for us.
Saint John Paul II, pray for us.
Saint Faustina, pray for us.

Official Pilgrim Prayer: World Youth Day—Krakow 2016

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Pilgrimage with Jesus

The violence described in the gospel today is as horrific as what we see in our world. It is difficult, at best, to make any sense of it, and yet not nearly as foreign an experience as one would wish. In the face of this unjust violence, the disciples take a very simple action; they walk to Jesus to share the news with him.

Their care for him gave them purpose in a moment that should have led to despair. Their strength comes with going to Jesus to share news that is important to them (and him). They find their hope in him, as do the millions who have assembled in Krakow, Poland in his name.

The disciples took a pilgrimage to Jesus; World Youth Day has been a pilgrimage for Jesus; and each of our lives is a pilgrimage with Jesus. Today, as we walk along our individual journeys, we can pray the prayer of WYD 2016. A prayer of pilgrimage, for in Jesus we can find the strength to persevere no matter what hindrances may come.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mt 14: 1-12

At that time Herod the ruler heard reports about Jesus; and he said to his servants, “This is John the Baptist; he has been raised from the dead, and for this reason these powers are at work in him.” For Herod had arrested John, bound him, and put him in prison on account of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because John had been telling him, “It is not lawful for you to have her.” Though Herod wanted to put him to death, he feared the crowd, because they regarded him as a prophet.

But when Herod’s birthday came, the daughter of Herodias danced before the company, and she pleased Herod so much that he promised on oath to grant her whatever she might ask. Prompted by her mother, she said, “Give me the head of John the Baptist here on a platter.” The king was grieved, yet out of regard for his oaths and for the guests, he commanded it to be given; he sent and had John beheaded in the prison. The head was brought on a platter and given to the girl, who brought it to her mother. His disciples came and took the body and buried it; then they went and told Jesus.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


July 29, 2016

St. Martha, disciple of the Lord

Jn 11: 19-27

And many of the Jews had come to Martha and Mary to console them about their brother. When Martha heard that Jesus was coming, she went and met him, while Mary stayed at home. Martha said to Jesus, “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died. But even now I know that God will give you whatever you ask of him.”

Jesus said to her, “Your brother will rise again.” Martha said to him, “I know that he will rise again in the resurrection on the last day.” Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?” She said to him, “Yes, Lord, I believe that you are the Messiah, the Son of God, the one coming into the world.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Hope and Life

In today’s gospel reading we witness the pain of leaving and loss. People come to greet Martha and Mary because their brother, Lazarus, has just died. However, Martha has faith even in the midst of the loss of her brother. When Martha sees that Jesus is among the people, she runs to him and tells Jesus that she believes that Lazarus would still be here if Jesus had been present. Jesus says, “whoever lives by believing in me will never die.”

It seems like Jesus wants Martha to profess her inward faith in him before he goes and performs a great outward miracle in raising Lazarus from the dead. Like Martha, when we walk by faith, even in the absence of outward signs of optimism, we become symbols of hope and life to our families, neighbors, and the global community.

—Kathleen Cullen Ritter serves as Director of Campus Ministry at Divine Savior Holy Angels High School, Milwaukee, WI. She attended Marquette University and served with the Jesuit Volunteer Corp in Bend, OR.

Prayer

Loving God, help me understand that the one thing you want most from me is my presence. Help me realize that my presence is the one gift I can give, and that it is often the only gift that matters. Help me let go of stress, worry, hurt, pain and grudges. All I need is to be more aware of Your presence in my life today and always. Amen.

—Kathleen Cullen Ritter

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Loving God, help me understand that the one thing you want most from me is my presence. Help me realize that my presence is the one gift I can give, and that it is often the only gift that matters. Help me let go of stress, worry, hurt, pain and grudges. All I need is to be more aware of Your presence in my life today and always. Amen.

—Kathleen Cullen Ritter

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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July 31, 2016

Feast of St. Ignatius of Loyola

Lk 12: 13-21

Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family inheritance with me.” But he said to him, “Friend, who set me to be a judge or arbitrator over you?” And he said to them, “Take care! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed; for one’s life does not consist in the abundance of possessions.”

Then he told them a parable: “The land of a rich man produced abundantly. And he thought to himself, ‘What should I do, for I have no place to store my crops?’ Then he said, ‘I will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, ‘Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’

But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Choose Life

A Jesuit in India, Fr. Hedwig Lewis, S.J., shares the following story which brings to life our daily struggle to choose life: A wise old man once imparted this lesson about life to his grandson.

“A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy. “It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil—he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.”

He continued, “The other is good—he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, benevolence, empathy, truth, compassion and faith. The same fight is going on inside you—and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?”

The old man replied,“The one you feed.”

(From “In Good Company:  Information and Insights for Jesuit Collaborators,” Gujarat Sahitya Prakash, Gujarat India, 2016, p. 37)

**********

On this the feast of St. Ignatius Loyola, let us do our best to feed “the good wolf “ inside of our hearts!

—Fr. Brian Paulson, S.J. serves as Provincial for Jesuits of the Chicago-Detroit province of the Society of Jesus.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, you invite me to be your companion in the footsteps of St. Ignatius.
Help me to feel with your heart, to see with your eyes, to touch with your hands.
May your very heartbeat in mine. Fill me with your good and Holy Spirit.  
As I make choices each day, give me the grace to choose life—your life—
so that your kingdom might be a little bit more visible in our world.

—Father Paulson

Please share the Good Word with your friends!



Prayer

Lord Jesus, you invite me to be your companion in the footsteps of St. Ignatius.
Help me to feel with your heart, to see with your eyes, to touch with your hands.
May your very heartbeat in mine. Fill me with your good and Holy Spirit.  
As I make choices each day, give me the grace to choose life—your life—
so that your kingdom might be a little bit more visible in our world.

—Father Paulson

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Choose Life

A Jesuit in India, Fr. Hedwig Lewis, S.J., shares the following story which brings to life our daily struggle to choose life: A wise old man once imparted this lesson about life to his grandson.

“A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy. “It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil—he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.”  

He continued, “The other is good—he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, benevolence, empathy, truth, compassion and faith. The same fight is going on inside you—and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?”

The old man replied,“The one you feed.”

(From “In Good Company:  Information and Insights for Jesuit Collaborators,” Gujarat Sahitya Prakash, Gujarat India, 2016, p. 37)

**********

On this the feast of St. Ignatius Loyola, let us do our best to feed “the good wolf “ inside of our hearts!

—Fr. Brian Paulson, S.J. serves as Provincial for Jesuits of the Chicago-Detroit province of the Society of Jesus.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Feast of St. Ignatius of Loyola

Lk 12: 13-21

Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family inheritance with me.” But he said to him, “Friend, who set me to be a judge or arbitrator over you?” And he said to them, “Take care! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed; for one’s life does not consist in the abundance of possessions.”

Then he told them a parable: “The land of a rich man produced abundantly. And he thought to himself, ‘What should I do, for I have no place to store my crops?’ Then he said, ‘I will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, ‘Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’

But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


July 30, 2016

Mt 14: 1-12

At that time Herod the ruler heard reports about Jesus; and he said to his servants, “This is John the Baptist; he has been raised from the dead, and for this reason these powers are at work in him.” For Herod had arrested John, bound him, and put him in prison on account of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because John had been telling him, “It is not lawful for you to have her.” Though Herod wanted to put him to death, he feared the crowd, because they regarded him as a prophet.

But when Herod’s birthday came, the daughter of Herodias danced before the company, and she pleased Herod so much that he promised on oath to grant her whatever she might ask. Prompted by her mother, she said, “Give me the head of John the Baptist here on a platter.” The king was grieved, yet out of regard for his oaths and for the guests, he commanded it to be given; he sent and had John beheaded in the prison. The head was brought on a platter and given to the girl, who brought it to her mother. His disciples came and took the body and buried it; then they went and told Jesus.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Pilgrimage with Jesus

The violence described in the gospel today is as horrific as what we see in our world. It is difficult, at best, to make any sense of it, and yet not nearly as foreign an experience as one would wish. In the face of this unjust violence, the disciples take a very simple action; they walk to Jesus to share the news with him.

Their care for him gave them purpose in a moment that should have led to despair. Their strength comes with going to Jesus to share news that is important to them (and him). They find their hope in him, as do the millions who have assembled in Krakow, Poland in his name.

The disciples took a pilgrimage to Jesus; World Youth Day has been a pilgrimage for Jesus; and each of our lives is a pilgrimage with Jesus. Today, as we walk along our individual journeys, we can pray the prayer of WYD 2016. A prayer of pilgrimage, for in Jesus we can find the strength to persevere no matter what hindrances may come.   

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

Prayer

God, merciful Father,
in your Son, Jesus Christ, you have revealed your love
and poured it out upon us in the Holy Spirit, the Comforter,
We entrust to you today the destiny of the world and of every man and woman”.
We entrust to you in a special way
young people of every language, people and nation:
guide and protect them as they walk the complex paths of the world today
and give them the grace to reap abundant fruits
from their experience of the Krakow World Youth Day.

Heavenly Father,
grant that we may bear witness to your mercy.
Teach us how to convey the faith to those in doubt,
hope to those who are discouraged,
love to those who feel indifferent,
forgiveness to those who have done wrong
and joy to those who are unhappy.

Allow the spark of merciful love
that you have enkindled within us
become a fire that can transform hearts
and renew the face of the earth.

Mary, Mother of Mercy, pray for us.
Saint John Paul II, pray for us.
Saint Faustina, pray for us.

Official Pilgrim Prayer: World Youth Day—Krakow 2016

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God, merciful Father,
in your Son, Jesus Christ, you have revealed your love
and poured it out upon us in the Holy Spirit, the Comforter,
We entrust to you today the destiny of the world and of every man and woman”.
We entrust to you in a special way
young people of every language, people and nation:
guide and protect them as they walk the complex paths of the world today
and give them the grace to reap abundant fruits
from their experience of the Krakow World Youth Day.

Heavenly Father,
grant that we may bear witness to your mercy.
Teach us how to convey the faith to those in doubt,
hope to those who are discouraged,
love to those who feel indifferent,
forgiveness to those who have done wrong
and joy to those who are unhappy.

Allow the spark of merciful love
that you have enkindled within us
become a fire that can transform hearts
and renew the face of the earth.

Mary, Mother of Mercy, pray for us.
Saint John Paul II, pray for us.
Saint Faustina, pray for us.

Official Pilgrim Prayer: World Youth Day—Krakow 2016

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Pilgrimage with Jesus

The violence described in the gospel today is as horrific as what we see in our world. It is difficult, at best, to make any sense of it, and yet not nearly as foreign an experience as one would wish. In the face of this unjust violence, the disciples take a very simple action; they walk to Jesus to share the news with him.

Their care for him gave them purpose in a moment that should have led to despair. Their strength comes with going to Jesus to share news that is important to them (and him). They find their hope in him, as do the millions who have assembled in Krakow, Poland in his name.

The disciples took a pilgrimage to Jesus; World Youth Day has been a pilgrimage for Jesus; and each of our lives is a pilgrimage with Jesus. Today, as we walk along our individual journeys, we can pray the prayer of WYD 2016. A prayer of pilgrimage, for in Jesus we can find the strength to persevere no matter what hindrances may come.

—Juan Ruiz, S.J., a scholastic of the U.S. Central Southern Jesuit province, just completed philosophy studies at Loyola University, Chicago IL.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mt 14: 1-12

At that time Herod the ruler heard reports about Jesus; and he said to his servants, “This is John the Baptist; he has been raised from the dead, and for this reason these powers are at work in him.” For Herod had arrested John, bound him, and put him in prison on account of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because John had been telling him, “It is not lawful for you to have her.” Though Herod wanted to put him to death, he feared the crowd, because they regarded him as a prophet.

But when Herod’s birthday came, the daughter of Herodias danced before the company, and she pleased Herod so much that he promised on oath to grant her whatever she might ask. Prompted by her mother, she said, “Give me the head of John the Baptist here on a platter.” The king was grieved, yet out of regard for his oaths and for the guests, he commanded it to be given; he sent and had John beheaded in the prison. The head was brought on a platter and given to the girl, who brought it to her mother. His disciples came and took the body and buried it; then they went and told Jesus.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


July 29, 2016

St. Martha, disciple of the Lord

Jn 11: 19-27

And many of the Jews had come to Martha and Mary to console them about their brother. When Martha heard that Jesus was coming, she went and met him, while Mary stayed at home. Martha said to Jesus, “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died. But even now I know that God will give you whatever you ask of him.”

Jesus said to her, “Your brother will rise again.” Martha said to him, “I know that he will rise again in the resurrection on the last day.” Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?” She said to him, “Yes, Lord, I believe that you are the Messiah, the Son of God, the one coming into the world.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Hope and Life

In today’s gospel reading we witness the pain of leaving and loss. People come to greet Martha and Mary because their brother, Lazarus, has just died. However, Martha has faith even in the midst of the loss of her brother. When Martha sees that Jesus is among the people, she runs to him and tells Jesus that she believes that Lazarus would still be here if Jesus had been present. Jesus says, “whoever lives by believing in me will never die.”

It seems like Jesus wants Martha to profess her inward faith in him before he goes and performs a great outward miracle in raising Lazarus from the dead. Like Martha, when we walk by faith, even in the absence of outward signs of optimism, we become symbols of hope and life to our families, neighbors, and the global community.

—Kathleen Cullen Ritter serves as Director of Campus Ministry at Divine Savior Holy Angels High School, Milwaukee, WI. She attended Marquette University and served with the Jesuit Volunteer Corp in Bend, OR.

Prayer

Loving God, help me understand that the one thing you want most from me is my presence. Help me realize that my presence is the one gift I can give, and that it is often the only gift that matters. Help me let go of stress, worry, hurt, pain and grudges. All I need is to be more aware of Your presence in my life today and always. Amen.

—Kathleen Cullen Ritter

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Loving God, help me understand that the one thing you want most from me is my presence. Help me realize that my presence is the one gift I can give, and that it is often the only gift that matters. Help me let go of stress, worry, hurt, pain and grudges. All I need is to be more aware of Your presence in my life today and always. Amen.

—Kathleen Cullen Ritter

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!