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The Road to Emmaus

 Our eyes falling down to the ground,
       Our hearts dry as the dust we trample.
     A stranger joins our journey to despair.
     and on until our grief can say no more,
Only then can his words water our withered spirits.

 Gently chiding, strongly guiding, weaving a story
 Of glory hidden within fabled prophecies of faith.
Later do we recall how fiercely our hearts did burn.

    Now is our turn, the time to beg him to linger,
   A request he can never refuse, for his every meal
  Is sacred space, every home he visits his sanctuary.

    For those who have eyes to see, bread blessed,
    Broken and shared is always more than bread.
      His presence no longer confined to history.

    This road we walked with him still beckons —
   To journey back from where we once despaired,
     Our eyes now raised in hopeful recognition.

—J. Michael Sparough, S.J. is a Retreat Master and Spiritual Director at the Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House outside Chicago. He blogs weekly at  www.heartoheart.org/Easter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

      As you listen to the cries of your people,
       walk with us, Lord, in our hour of need 
       Open our minds to Your grace unfolding
   In ways we cannot see but can learn to accept.

   Enflame the eyes of our souls to recognize you
 here and now in broken hearts and breaking bread
 as You continue to communion at table within us.

—J. Michael Sparough, S.J.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Lk 24:13-35

Now on that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, and talking with each other about all these things that had happened. While they were talking and discussing, Jesus himself came near and went with them, but their eyes were kept from recognizing him. And he said to them, “What are you discussing with each other while you walk along?”

They stood still, looking sad. Then one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answered him, “Are you the only stranger in Jerusalem who does not know the things that have taken place there in these days?” He asked them, “What things?” They replied, “The things about Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people, and how our chief priests and leaders handed him over to be condemned to death and crucified him. But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things took place

Moreover, some women of our group astounded us. They were at the tomb early this morning, and when they did not find his body there, they came back and told us that they had indeed seen a vision of angels who said that he was alive. Some of those who were with us went to the tomb and found it just as the women had said; but they did not see him.”

Then he said to them, “Oh, how foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have declared! Was it not necessary that the Messiah should suffer these things and then enter into his glory?” Then beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures. As they came near the village to which they were going, he walked ahead as if he were going on. But they urged him strongly, saying, “Stay with us, because it is almost evening and the day is now nearly over.”

So he went in to stay with them. When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him; and he vanished from their sight. They said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?” That same hour they got up and returned to Jerusalem; and they found the eleven and their companions gathered together.

They were saying, “The Lord has risen indeed, and he has appeared to Simon!” Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he had been made known to them in the breaking of the bread.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


April 30, 2017

Lk 24:13-35

Now on that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, and talking with each other about all these things that had happened. While they were talking and discussing, Jesus himself came near and went with them, but their eyes were kept from recognizing him. And he said to them, “What are you discussing with each other while you walk along?”

They stood still, looking sad. Then one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answered him, “Are you the only stranger in Jerusalem who does not know the things that have taken place there in these days?” He asked them, “What things?” They replied, “The things about Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people, and how our chief priests and leaders handed him over to be condemned to death and crucified him. But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things took place

Moreover, some women of our group astounded us. They were at the tomb early this morning, and when they did not find his body there, they came back and told us that they had indeed seen a vision of angels who said that he was alive. Some of those who were with us went to the tomb and found it just as the women had said; but they did not see him.”

Then he said to them, “Oh, how foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have declared! Was it not necessary that the Messiah should suffer these things and then enter into his glory?” Then beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures. As they came near the village to which they were going, he walked ahead as if he were going on. But they urged him strongly, saying, “Stay with us, because it is almost evening and the day is now nearly over.”

So he went in to stay with them. When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him; and he vanished from their sight. They said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?” That same hour they got up and returned to Jerusalem; and they found the eleven and their companions gathered together.

They were saying, “The Lord has risen indeed, and he has appeared to Simon!” Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he had been made known to them in the breaking of the bread.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

The Road to Emmaus

         Our eyes falling down to the ground,
       Our hearts dry as the dust we trample.
     A stranger joins our journey to despair.
     and on until our grief can say no more,
Only then can his words water our withered spirits.

 Gently chiding, strongly guiding, weaving a story
 Of glory hidden within fabled prophecies of faith.
Later do we recall how fiercely our hearts did burn.

    Now is our turn, the time to beg him to linger,
   A request he can never refuse, for his every meal
  Is sacred space, every home he visits his sanctuary.

    For those who have eyes to see, bread blessed,
    Broken and shared is always more than bread.
      His presence no longer confined to history.

    This road we walked with him still beckons —
   To journey back from where we once despaired,
     Our eyes now raised in hopeful recognition.

—J. Michael Sparough, S.J. is a Retreat Master and Spiritual Director at the Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House outside Chicago. He blogs weekly at  www.heartoheart.org/Easter

Prayer

      As you listen to the cries of your people,
       walk with us, Lord, in our hour of need 
       Open our minds to Your grace unfolding
   In ways we cannot see but can learn to accept.

   Enflame the eyes of our souls to recognize you
 here and now in broken hearts and breaking bread
 as You continue to communion at table within us.

—J. Michael Sparough, S.J.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Catherine of Seina, v, dr M

Acts 6: 1-7

Now during those days, when the disciples were increasing in number, the Hellenists complained against the Hebrews because their widows were being neglected in the daily distribution of food. And the twelve called together the whole community of the disciples and said, “It is not right that we should neglect the word of God in order to wait on tables. Therefore, friends, select from among yourselves seven men of good standing, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we may appoint to this task, while we, for our part, will devote ourselves to prayer and to serving the word.”

What they said pleased the whole community, and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and the Holy Spirit, together with Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolaus, a proselyte of Antioch. They had these men stand before the apostles, who prayed and laid their hands on them. The word of God continued to spread; the number of the disciples increased greatly in Jerusalem, and a great many of the priests became obedient to the faith.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


April 29, 2017

Catherine of Siena, v, dr M

Acts 6: 1-7

Now during those days, when the disciples were increasing in number, the Hellenists complained against the Hebrews because their widows were being neglected in the daily distribution of food. And the twelve called together the whole community of the disciples and said, “It is not right that we should neglect the word of God in order to wait on tables. Therefore, friends, select from among yourselves seven men of good standing, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we may appoint to this task, while we, for our part, will devote ourselves to prayer and to serving the word.”

What they said pleased the whole community, and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and the Holy Spirit, together with Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolaus, a proselyte of Antioch. They had these men stand before the apostles, who prayed and laid their hands on them. The word of God continued to spread; the number of the disciples increased greatly in Jerusalem, and a great many of the priests became obedient to the faith.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Alive and Unafraid

This weekend brings us to the end of April, a month in which the dying and rising of Jesus have been part of our daily faith experience. Today’s reading from the Acts of the Apostles recounts the choice of seven disciples to attend to the daily tasks of feeding the poor and assisting those in need.

Each of us walks in the shoes of these disciples: we carry forward the daily outreach of Jesus in practical, often unnoticed service of one another…at home, at work and in school. We are charged to recognize one another’s needsthe needs of the body, yes! But also the needs of the heart and spirit. This is what it means to throw in our lot with the Risen Jesus. This is the practical reality of sharing his life and spirit in our daily walk with one another.

Jesus Christ is risen today! How will others recognize this reality in what I say and do today?

—the Jesuit prayer team

Prayer

Up from the tomb of all the past conceals!
See how our God a brighter day reveals.
Up from the tomb! Though death had bound us tight,
Like Lazarus, we stumble into light!

—Rory Cooney, “Up From the Earth” © 1987, North American Liturgy Resources

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Up from the tomb of all the past conceals!
See how our God a brighter day reveals.
Up from the tomb! Though death had bound us tight,
Like Lazarus, we stumble into light!

—Rory Cooney, “Up From the Earth” © 1987, North American Liturgy Resources

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Alive and Unafraid

This weekend brings us to the end of April, a month in which the dying and rising of Jesus have been part of our daily faith experience. Today’s reading from the Acts of the Apostles recounts the choice of seven disciples to attend to the daily tasks of feeding the poor and assisting those in need.

Each of us walks in the shoes of these disciples: we carry forward the daily outreach of Jesus in practical, often unnoticed service of one another…at home, at work and in school. We are charged to recognize one another’s needs—the needs of the body, yes! But also the needs of the heart and spirit. This is what it means to throw in our lot with the Risen Jesus. This is the practical reality of sharing his life and spirit in our daily walk with one another.

Jesus Christ is risen today! How will others recognize this reality in what I say and do today?

—the Jesuit prayer team

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Eternal Father, confirm me,
Eternal Son, confirm me,
Holy Spirit, confirm me,
Holy Trinity, confirm me,
My one and only God, confirm me.

—from the Journal of St. Ignatius Loyola

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


What Are We to Do?

Life after the resurrection of Jesus was not as easy as one would think. The Sanhedrin were feeling threatened by the Apostles. Their focus was on proclaiming Jesus Christ. What about the Apostles threatens you?

The Church today is invited to remember, through the Gospel of John (6:1-10), a time when Jesus fed the large crowd. They didn’t know how to respond to Jesus’ compassion for the crowd. They didn’t know what to do after Jesus fed them and collected the fragments. Their interest continues to be in trying to focus on Jesus, but they kept drifting back to focusing on their own desires.

In today’s reading from the Acts of the Apostles, Gamaliel’s advice offers a good invitation. “For if this endeavor or this activity is of human origin, it will destroy itself.  But if it comes from God, you will not be able to destroy them; you may even find yourselves fighting against God.” (Acts 5: 34-42)

Jesus knows enough to keep drawing us into compassion and care for others. Is Jesus’ love and compassion the driving example in your life? Do you look to feed those who are drawn to you in desire for love of the Risen Jesus?

—Fr. Kevin Schneider, SJ is the director of adult spirituality programs at Creighton Preparatory School in Omaha, NE. He is a spiritual director and offers parish missions and retreats in the style of Ignatian Spirituality.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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The Road to Emmaus

 Our eyes falling down to the ground,
       Our hearts dry as the dust we trample.
     A stranger joins our journey to despair.
     and on until our grief can say no more,
Only then can his words water our withered spirits.

 Gently chiding, strongly guiding, weaving a story
 Of glory hidden within fabled prophecies of faith.
Later do we recall how fiercely our hearts did burn.

    Now is our turn, the time to beg him to linger,
   A request he can never refuse, for his every meal
  Is sacred space, every home he visits his sanctuary.

    For those who have eyes to see, bread blessed,
    Broken and shared is always more than bread.
      His presence no longer confined to history.

    This road we walked with him still beckons —
   To journey back from where we once despaired,
     Our eyes now raised in hopeful recognition.

—J. Michael Sparough, S.J. is a Retreat Master and Spiritual Director at the Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House outside Chicago. He blogs weekly at  www.heartoheart.org/Easter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

      As you listen to the cries of your people,
       walk with us, Lord, in our hour of need 
       Open our minds to Your grace unfolding
   In ways we cannot see but can learn to accept.

   Enflame the eyes of our souls to recognize you
 here and now in broken hearts and breaking bread
 as You continue to communion at table within us.

—J. Michael Sparough, S.J.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Lk 24:13-35

Now on that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, and talking with each other about all these things that had happened. While they were talking and discussing, Jesus himself came near and went with them, but their eyes were kept from recognizing him. And he said to them, “What are you discussing with each other while you walk along?”

They stood still, looking sad. Then one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answered him, “Are you the only stranger in Jerusalem who does not know the things that have taken place there in these days?” He asked them, “What things?” They replied, “The things about Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people, and how our chief priests and leaders handed him over to be condemned to death and crucified him. But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things took place

Moreover, some women of our group astounded us. They were at the tomb early this morning, and when they did not find his body there, they came back and told us that they had indeed seen a vision of angels who said that he was alive. Some of those who were with us went to the tomb and found it just as the women had said; but they did not see him.”

Then he said to them, “Oh, how foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have declared! Was it not necessary that the Messiah should suffer these things and then enter into his glory?” Then beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures. As they came near the village to which they were going, he walked ahead as if he were going on. But they urged him strongly, saying, “Stay with us, because it is almost evening and the day is now nearly over.”

So he went in to stay with them. When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him; and he vanished from their sight. They said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?” That same hour they got up and returned to Jerusalem; and they found the eleven and their companions gathered together.

They were saying, “The Lord has risen indeed, and he has appeared to Simon!” Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he had been made known to them in the breaking of the bread.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


April 30, 2017

Lk 24:13-35

Now on that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, and talking with each other about all these things that had happened. While they were talking and discussing, Jesus himself came near and went with them, but their eyes were kept from recognizing him. And he said to them, “What are you discussing with each other while you walk along?”

They stood still, looking sad. Then one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answered him, “Are you the only stranger in Jerusalem who does not know the things that have taken place there in these days?” He asked them, “What things?” They replied, “The things about Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people, and how our chief priests and leaders handed him over to be condemned to death and crucified him. But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things took place

Moreover, some women of our group astounded us. They were at the tomb early this morning, and when they did not find his body there, they came back and told us that they had indeed seen a vision of angels who said that he was alive. Some of those who were with us went to the tomb and found it just as the women had said; but they did not see him.”

Then he said to them, “Oh, how foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have declared! Was it not necessary that the Messiah should suffer these things and then enter into his glory?” Then beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them the things about himself in all the scriptures. As they came near the village to which they were going, he walked ahead as if he were going on. But they urged him strongly, saying, “Stay with us, because it is almost evening and the day is now nearly over.”

So he went in to stay with them. When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him; and he vanished from their sight. They said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?” That same hour they got up and returned to Jerusalem; and they found the eleven and their companions gathered together.

They were saying, “The Lord has risen indeed, and he has appeared to Simon!” Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he had been made known to them in the breaking of the bread.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

The Road to Emmaus

         Our eyes falling down to the ground,
       Our hearts dry as the dust we trample.
     A stranger joins our journey to despair.
     and on until our grief can say no more,
Only then can his words water our withered spirits.

 Gently chiding, strongly guiding, weaving a story
 Of glory hidden within fabled prophecies of faith.
Later do we recall how fiercely our hearts did burn.

    Now is our turn, the time to beg him to linger,
   A request he can never refuse, for his every meal
  Is sacred space, every home he visits his sanctuary.

    For those who have eyes to see, bread blessed,
    Broken and shared is always more than bread.
      His presence no longer confined to history.

    This road we walked with him still beckons —
   To journey back from where we once despaired,
     Our eyes now raised in hopeful recognition.

—J. Michael Sparough, S.J. is a Retreat Master and Spiritual Director at the Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House outside Chicago. He blogs weekly at  www.heartoheart.org/Easter

Prayer

      As you listen to the cries of your people,
       walk with us, Lord, in our hour of need 
       Open our minds to Your grace unfolding
   In ways we cannot see but can learn to accept.

   Enflame the eyes of our souls to recognize you
 here and now in broken hearts and breaking bread
 as You continue to communion at table within us.

—J. Michael Sparough, S.J.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Catherine of Seina, v, dr M

Acts 6: 1-7

Now during those days, when the disciples were increasing in number, the Hellenists complained against the Hebrews because their widows were being neglected in the daily distribution of food. And the twelve called together the whole community of the disciples and said, “It is not right that we should neglect the word of God in order to wait on tables. Therefore, friends, select from among yourselves seven men of good standing, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we may appoint to this task, while we, for our part, will devote ourselves to prayer and to serving the word.”

What they said pleased the whole community, and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and the Holy Spirit, together with Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolaus, a proselyte of Antioch. They had these men stand before the apostles, who prayed and laid their hands on them. The word of God continued to spread; the number of the disciples increased greatly in Jerusalem, and a great many of the priests became obedient to the faith.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


April 29, 2017

Catherine of Siena, v, dr M

Acts 6: 1-7

Now during those days, when the disciples were increasing in number, the Hellenists complained against the Hebrews because their widows were being neglected in the daily distribution of food. And the twelve called together the whole community of the disciples and said, “It is not right that we should neglect the word of God in order to wait on tables. Therefore, friends, select from among yourselves seven men of good standing, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we may appoint to this task, while we, for our part, will devote ourselves to prayer and to serving the word.”

What they said pleased the whole community, and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and the Holy Spirit, together with Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolaus, a proselyte of Antioch. They had these men stand before the apostles, who prayed and laid their hands on them. The word of God continued to spread; the number of the disciples increased greatly in Jerusalem, and a great many of the priests became obedient to the faith.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Alive and Unafraid

This weekend brings us to the end of April, a month in which the dying and rising of Jesus have been part of our daily faith experience. Today’s reading from the Acts of the Apostles recounts the choice of seven disciples to attend to the daily tasks of feeding the poor and assisting those in need.

Each of us walks in the shoes of these disciples: we carry forward the daily outreach of Jesus in practical, often unnoticed service of one another…at home, at work and in school. We are charged to recognize one another’s needsthe needs of the body, yes! But also the needs of the heart and spirit. This is what it means to throw in our lot with the Risen Jesus. This is the practical reality of sharing his life and spirit in our daily walk with one another.

Jesus Christ is risen today! How will others recognize this reality in what I say and do today?

—the Jesuit prayer team

Prayer

Up from the tomb of all the past conceals!
See how our God a brighter day reveals.
Up from the tomb! Though death had bound us tight,
Like Lazarus, we stumble into light!

—Rory Cooney, “Up From the Earth” © 1987, North American Liturgy Resources

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Up from the tomb of all the past conceals!
See how our God a brighter day reveals.
Up from the tomb! Though death had bound us tight,
Like Lazarus, we stumble into light!

—Rory Cooney, “Up From the Earth” © 1987, North American Liturgy Resources

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Alive and Unafraid

This weekend brings us to the end of April, a month in which the dying and rising of Jesus have been part of our daily faith experience. Today’s reading from the Acts of the Apostles recounts the choice of seven disciples to attend to the daily tasks of feeding the poor and assisting those in need.

Each of us walks in the shoes of these disciples: we carry forward the daily outreach of Jesus in practical, often unnoticed service of one another…at home, at work and in school. We are charged to recognize one another’s needs—the needs of the body, yes! But also the needs of the heart and spirit. This is what it means to throw in our lot with the Risen Jesus. This is the practical reality of sharing his life and spirit in our daily walk with one another.

Jesus Christ is risen today! How will others recognize this reality in what I say and do today?

—the Jesuit prayer team

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Eternal Father, confirm me,
Eternal Son, confirm me,
Holy Spirit, confirm me,
Holy Trinity, confirm me,
My one and only God, confirm me.

—from the Journal of St. Ignatius Loyola

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


What Are We to Do?

Life after the resurrection of Jesus was not as easy as one would think. The Sanhedrin were feeling threatened by the Apostles. Their focus was on proclaiming Jesus Christ. What about the Apostles threatens you?

The Church today is invited to remember, through the Gospel of John (6:1-10), a time when Jesus fed the large crowd. They didn’t know how to respond to Jesus’ compassion for the crowd. They didn’t know what to do after Jesus fed them and collected the fragments. Their interest continues to be in trying to focus on Jesus, but they kept drifting back to focusing on their own desires.

In today’s reading from the Acts of the Apostles, Gamaliel’s advice offers a good invitation. “For if this endeavor or this activity is of human origin, it will destroy itself.  But if it comes from God, you will not be able to destroy them; you may even find yourselves fighting against God.” (Acts 5: 34-42)

Jesus knows enough to keep drawing us into compassion and care for others. Is Jesus’ love and compassion the driving example in your life? Do you look to feed those who are drawn to you in desire for love of the Risen Jesus?

—Fr. Kevin Schneider, SJ is the director of adult spirituality programs at Creighton Preparatory School in Omaha, NE. He is a spiritual director and offers parish missions and retreats in the style of Ignatian Spirituality.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!