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Prayer

God of love, whose compassion never fails, we bring you the griefs and perils of peoples and nations. The pains of the sick and the injured, the sighing of prisoners and captives.  The sorrows of the bereaved, the necessities of the homeless, the helplessness of the weak, the despair of weary, the failing powers of the aged.  Comfort and relieve them, O merciful Lord. According to their several needs and your great mercy. Amen.

—St. Anselm of Canterbury

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Seeing God’s Face

To me this reads like one more version of the beatitudes or simply said treat others as you want to be treated. Paul, speaking to the new fledgling Christian communities, must have found it necessary to explain why they should be different because of the Christ experience.

These letters were written hundreds of years in the past. Preserve the good; treat one another with respect; have hope; serve God; and basically love one another with true affection, and be welcoming.

We are living in times when this same message must be repeated over and over. It is not so difficult to apply the sentiment to the locals in my community and the members of my own church. But I find it pretty difficult outside my own comfort zone–to refugees and the undocumented. So do we build walls or do we knock down the walls as we see the face of God looking at us for a place to rest his head?

—Camille Devaney serves as Board chair for the Ignatian Spirituality Project (ISP).  

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Rom 12: 9-16

Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good; love one another with mutual affection; outdo one another in showing honor. Do not lag in zeal, be ardent in spirit, serve the Lord. Rejoice in hope, be patient in suffering, persevere in prayer. Contribute to the needs of the saints; extend hospitality to strangers. Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse them. Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep. Live in harmony with one another; do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly; do not claim to be wiser than you are.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


May 31, 2017

Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Rom 12: 9-16

Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good; love one another with mutual affection; outdo one another in showing honor. Do not lag in zeal, be ardent in spirit, serve the Lord. Rejoice in hope, be patient in suffering, persevere in prayer. Contribute to the needs of the saints; extend hospitality to strangers. Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse them. Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep. Live in harmony with one another; do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly; do not claim to be wiser than you are.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Seeing God’s Face

To me this reads like one more version of the beatitudes or simply said treat others as you want to be treated. Paul, speaking to the new fledgling Christian communities, must have found it necessary to explain why they should be different because of the Christ experience.

These letters were written hundreds of years in the past. Preserve the good; treat one another with respect; have hope; serve God; and basically love one another with true affection, and be welcoming.

We are living in times when this same message must be repeated over and over. It is not so difficult to apply the sentiment to the locals in my community and the members of my own church. But I find it pretty difficult outside my own comfort zone–to refugees and the undocumented. So do we build walls or do we knock down the walls as we see the face of God looking at us for a place to rest his head?

—Camille Devaney serves as Board chair for the Ignatian Spirituality Project (ISP).  

Prayer

God of love, whose compassion never fails, we bring you the griefs and perils of peoples and nations. The pains of the sick and the injured, the sighing of prisoners and captives.  The sorrows of the bereaved, the necessities of the homeless, the helplessness of the weak, the despair of weary, the failing powers of the aged.  Comfort and relieve them, O merciful Lord. According to their several needs and your great mercy. Amen.

—St. Anselm of Canterbury

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty,
my memory, my understanding,
and my entire will,
all I have and call my own.
You have given all to me.
To you, Lord, I return it.
Everything is yours; do with it what you will.
Give me only your love and your grace,
that is enough for me.

—Suscipe prayer of St. Ignatius

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Jn 17: 1-11a

After Jesus had spoken these words, he looked up to heaven and said, “Father, the hour has come; glorify your Son so that the Son may glorify you, since you have given him authority over all people, to give eternal life to all whom you have given him. And this is eternal life, that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent. I glorified you on earth by finishing the work that you gave me to do. So now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had in your presence before the world existed.

”I have made your name known to those whom you gave me from the world. They were yours, and you gave them to me, and they have kept your word. Now they know that everything you have given me is from you; for the words that you gave to me I have given to them, and they have received them and know in truth that I came from you; and they have believed that you sent me.

I am asking on their behalf; I am not asking on behalf of the world, but on behalf of those whom you gave me, because they are yours. All mine are yours, and yours are mine; and I have been glorified in them.

And now I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them in your name that you have given me, so that they may be one, as we are one.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


May 30, 2017

Jn 17: 1-11a

After Jesus had spoken these words, he looked up to heaven and said, “Father, the hour has come; glorify your Son so that the Son may glorify you, since you have given him authority over all people, to give eternal life to all whom you have given him. And this is eternal life, that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent. I glorified you on earth by finishing the work that you gave me to do. So now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had in your presence before the world existed.

”I have made your name known to those whom you gave me from the world. They were yours, and you gave them to me, and they have kept your word. Now they know that everything you have given me is from you; for the words that you gave to me I have given to them, and they have received them and know in truth that I came from you; and they have believed that you sent me.

I am asking on their behalf; I am not asking on behalf of the world, but on behalf of those whom you gave me, because they are yours. All mine are yours, and yours are mine; and I have been glorified in them.

And now I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them in your name that you have given me, so that they may be one, as we are one.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

All is gift

The similarity between Jesus’s prayer in today’s Gospel and the Suscipe (or the Take, Lord, and Receive) prayer at the end of the Spiritual Exercises is remarkable.  Each of these prayers has as its foundation the understanding that all that we have, and all that we are, comes from God.  

These words that Jesus speaks in today’s Gospel come just before he is arrested.  His prayer is that his followers remain close to the Father.  In the style so typical of John’s Gospel, the language Jesus uses is verbose, to say the least, and beautifully poetic.  Each sentence in this passage could be its own prayer meditation.  

Referring to his disciples, Jesus says, “they accepted [the words you gave to me] and truly understood that I came from you, and they have believed that you sent me.”  How can you act today based on your understanding that all that Jesus commanded us to do came from the Father?

—The Jesuit prayer team

Prayer

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty,
my memory, my understanding,
and my entire will,
all I have and call my own.
You have given all to me.
To you, Lord, I return it.
Everything is yours; do with it what you will.
Give me only your love and your grace,
that is enough for me.

—Suscipe prayer of St. Ignatius

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God of power and mercy, 
you destroy war and put down earthly pride.
Banish violence from our midst and wipe away our tears,
that we may all deserve to be called your sons and daughters.
Keep in your mercy those men and women
who have died in the cause of freedom
and bring them safely
into your kingdom of justice and peace.
We ask this through Jesus Christ our Lord.

—Prayer for Memorial Day, Catholic Household Blessings and Prayers, USCCB

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Searching for Meaning

I find it just a touch ironic that in John’s Gospel, of all the Gospels, the disciples might say, “now you are talking plainly.”  John’s Gospel is rich in imagery and meaning, but the substance can be veiled at times.  Searching for meaning, especially in our lives, can take time and effort.

In today’s world, we want easy answers.  We want knowledge, comfort, and security and we want it now.

Earlier in this chapter of John, Jesus reminds the disciples that their anguish will turn to joy.  While comforting in theory, for anyone experiencing grief or sadness this transformation might seem impossible.  And that’s okay.

Today, on Memorial Day, we remember the sacrifice of those who have gone before us in service to our highest ideals as a people.  We keep their memories alive so that we, like the disciples, might truly appreciate, reverence, and share the gift of peace.

—Jordan Skarr works in the Office of Pastoral Ministries for the Midwest Jesuits.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Jn 16: 29-33

His disciples said, “Yes, now you are speaking plainly, not in any figure of speech! Now we know that you know all things, and do not need to have anyone question you; by this we believe that you came from God.” Jesus answered them, “Do you now believe? The hour is coming, indeed it has come, when you will be scattered, each one to his home, and you will leave me alone. Yet I am not alone because the Father is with me. I have said this to you, so that in me you may have peace. In the world you face persecution.

But take courage; I have conquered the world!”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

God of love, whose compassion never fails, we bring you the griefs and perils of peoples and nations. The pains of the sick and the injured, the sighing of prisoners and captives.  The sorrows of the bereaved, the necessities of the homeless, the helplessness of the weak, the despair of weary, the failing powers of the aged.  Comfort and relieve them, O merciful Lord. According to their several needs and your great mercy. Amen.

—St. Anselm of Canterbury

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Seeing God’s Face

To me this reads like one more version of the beatitudes or simply said treat others as you want to be treated. Paul, speaking to the new fledgling Christian communities, must have found it necessary to explain why they should be different because of the Christ experience.

These letters were written hundreds of years in the past. Preserve the good; treat one another with respect; have hope; serve God; and basically love one another with true affection, and be welcoming.

We are living in times when this same message must be repeated over and over. It is not so difficult to apply the sentiment to the locals in my community and the members of my own church. But I find it pretty difficult outside my own comfort zone–to refugees and the undocumented. So do we build walls or do we knock down the walls as we see the face of God looking at us for a place to rest his head?

—Camille Devaney serves as Board chair for the Ignatian Spirituality Project (ISP).  

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Rom 12: 9-16

Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good; love one another with mutual affection; outdo one another in showing honor. Do not lag in zeal, be ardent in spirit, serve the Lord. Rejoice in hope, be patient in suffering, persevere in prayer. Contribute to the needs of the saints; extend hospitality to strangers. Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse them. Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep. Live in harmony with one another; do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly; do not claim to be wiser than you are.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


May 31, 2017

Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Rom 12: 9-16

Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good; love one another with mutual affection; outdo one another in showing honor. Do not lag in zeal, be ardent in spirit, serve the Lord. Rejoice in hope, be patient in suffering, persevere in prayer. Contribute to the needs of the saints; extend hospitality to strangers. Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse them. Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep. Live in harmony with one another; do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly; do not claim to be wiser than you are.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Seeing God’s Face

To me this reads like one more version of the beatitudes or simply said treat others as you want to be treated. Paul, speaking to the new fledgling Christian communities, must have found it necessary to explain why they should be different because of the Christ experience.

These letters were written hundreds of years in the past. Preserve the good; treat one another with respect; have hope; serve God; and basically love one another with true affection, and be welcoming.

We are living in times when this same message must be repeated over and over. It is not so difficult to apply the sentiment to the locals in my community and the members of my own church. But I find it pretty difficult outside my own comfort zone–to refugees and the undocumented. So do we build walls or do we knock down the walls as we see the face of God looking at us for a place to rest his head?

—Camille Devaney serves as Board chair for the Ignatian Spirituality Project (ISP).  

Prayer

God of love, whose compassion never fails, we bring you the griefs and perils of peoples and nations. The pains of the sick and the injured, the sighing of prisoners and captives.  The sorrows of the bereaved, the necessities of the homeless, the helplessness of the weak, the despair of weary, the failing powers of the aged.  Comfort and relieve them, O merciful Lord. According to their several needs and your great mercy. Amen.

—St. Anselm of Canterbury

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty,
my memory, my understanding,
and my entire will,
all I have and call my own.
You have given all to me.
To you, Lord, I return it.
Everything is yours; do with it what you will.
Give me only your love and your grace,
that is enough for me.

—Suscipe prayer of St. Ignatius

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Jn 17: 1-11a

After Jesus had spoken these words, he looked up to heaven and said, “Father, the hour has come; glorify your Son so that the Son may glorify you, since you have given him authority over all people, to give eternal life to all whom you have given him. And this is eternal life, that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent. I glorified you on earth by finishing the work that you gave me to do. So now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had in your presence before the world existed.

”I have made your name known to those whom you gave me from the world. They were yours, and you gave them to me, and they have kept your word. Now they know that everything you have given me is from you; for the words that you gave to me I have given to them, and they have received them and know in truth that I came from you; and they have believed that you sent me.

I am asking on their behalf; I am not asking on behalf of the world, but on behalf of those whom you gave me, because they are yours. All mine are yours, and yours are mine; and I have been glorified in them.

And now I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them in your name that you have given me, so that they may be one, as we are one.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


May 30, 2017

Jn 17: 1-11a

After Jesus had spoken these words, he looked up to heaven and said, “Father, the hour has come; glorify your Son so that the Son may glorify you, since you have given him authority over all people, to give eternal life to all whom you have given him. And this is eternal life, that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent. I glorified you on earth by finishing the work that you gave me to do. So now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had in your presence before the world existed.

”I have made your name known to those whom you gave me from the world. They were yours, and you gave them to me, and they have kept your word. Now they know that everything you have given me is from you; for the words that you gave to me I have given to them, and they have received them and know in truth that I came from you; and they have believed that you sent me.

I am asking on their behalf; I am not asking on behalf of the world, but on behalf of those whom you gave me, because they are yours. All mine are yours, and yours are mine; and I have been glorified in them.

And now I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, protect them in your name that you have given me, so that they may be one, as we are one.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

All is gift

The similarity between Jesus’s prayer in today’s Gospel and the Suscipe (or the Take, Lord, and Receive) prayer at the end of the Spiritual Exercises is remarkable.  Each of these prayers has as its foundation the understanding that all that we have, and all that we are, comes from God.  

These words that Jesus speaks in today’s Gospel come just before he is arrested.  His prayer is that his followers remain close to the Father.  In the style so typical of John’s Gospel, the language Jesus uses is verbose, to say the least, and beautifully poetic.  Each sentence in this passage could be its own prayer meditation.  

Referring to his disciples, Jesus says, “they accepted [the words you gave to me] and truly understood that I came from you, and they have believed that you sent me.”  How can you act today based on your understanding that all that Jesus commanded us to do came from the Father?

—The Jesuit prayer team

Prayer

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty,
my memory, my understanding,
and my entire will,
all I have and call my own.
You have given all to me.
To you, Lord, I return it.
Everything is yours; do with it what you will.
Give me only your love and your grace,
that is enough for me.

—Suscipe prayer of St. Ignatius

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God of power and mercy, 
you destroy war and put down earthly pride.
Banish violence from our midst and wipe away our tears,
that we may all deserve to be called your sons and daughters.
Keep in your mercy those men and women
who have died in the cause of freedom
and bring them safely
into your kingdom of justice and peace.
We ask this through Jesus Christ our Lord.

—Prayer for Memorial Day, Catholic Household Blessings and Prayers, USCCB

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Searching for Meaning

I find it just a touch ironic that in John’s Gospel, of all the Gospels, the disciples might say, “now you are talking plainly.”  John’s Gospel is rich in imagery and meaning, but the substance can be veiled at times.  Searching for meaning, especially in our lives, can take time and effort.

In today’s world, we want easy answers.  We want knowledge, comfort, and security and we want it now.

Earlier in this chapter of John, Jesus reminds the disciples that their anguish will turn to joy.  While comforting in theory, for anyone experiencing grief or sadness this transformation might seem impossible.  And that’s okay.

Today, on Memorial Day, we remember the sacrifice of those who have gone before us in service to our highest ideals as a people.  We keep their memories alive so that we, like the disciples, might truly appreciate, reverence, and share the gift of peace.

—Jordan Skarr works in the Office of Pastoral Ministries for the Midwest Jesuits.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Jn 16: 29-33

His disciples said, “Yes, now you are speaking plainly, not in any figure of speech! Now we know that you know all things, and do not need to have anyone question you; by this we believe that you came from God.” Jesus answered them, “Do you now believe? The hour is coming, indeed it has come, when you will be scattered, each one to his home, and you will leave me alone. Yet I am not alone because the Father is with me. I have said this to you, so that in me you may have peace. In the world you face persecution.

But take courage; I have conquered the world!”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!