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Prayer

Lord, by healing the man with leprosy and sending him to the priests, you allowed his life to be a witness to your healing power. May our lives also be witnesses of your love and grace to those we encounter.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Show, Don’t Tell

The English teachers at my Jesuit high school had a maxim for descriptive writing: “Show, don’t tell.” Instead of writing, “Mr. Gibson looked tired,” one might show how Mr. Gibson looked: “Wrinkled bags hung under Mr. Gibson’s eyes.” Such concrete language allows the reader to picture the scene and draw her own conclusions about Mr. Gibson.

Jesus gives similar instructions to the ex-leper in today’s Gospel: Show, don’t tell. The priest is likely skeptical about Jesus: Is Jesus actually holy, or just a troublemaker? So Jesus sends the leper not to tell the priest that Jesus is a good guy, but to “show [him]self to the priest.” Jesus, like a good writer, lets the details speak for themselves: A man’s skin, once covered in bulging bumps and rough scales, is now smooth as a baby’s bottom. What does that say about Jesus? You, like the priest, can decide.

—Dan Everson is a Jesuit scholastic of the U.S. Central and Southern Province, studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

Mt 8: 1-4

When Jesus had come down from the mountain, great crowds followed him; and there was a leper who came to him and knelt before him, saying, “Lord, if you choose, you can make me clean.” He stretched out his hand and touched him, saying, “I do choose. Be made clean!” Immediately his leprosy was cleansed. Then Jesus said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone; but go, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


June 30, 2017

First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

Mt 8: 1-4

When Jesus had come down from the mountain, great crowds followed him; and there was a leper who came to him and knelt before him, saying, “Lord, if you choose, you can make me clean.” He stretched out his hand and touched him, saying, “I do choose. Be made clean!” Immediately his leprosy was cleansed. Then Jesus said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone; but go, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Show, Don’t Tell

The English teachers at my Jesuit high school had a maxim for descriptive writing: “Show, don’t tell.” Instead of writing, “Mr. Gibson looked tired,” one might show how Mr. Gibson looked: “Wrinkled bags hung under Mr. Gibson’s eyes.” Such concrete language allows the reader to picture the scene and draw her own conclusions about Mr. Gibson.

Jesus gives similar instructions to the ex-leper in today’s Gospel: Show, don’t tell. The priest is likely skeptical about Jesus: Is Jesus actually holy, or just a troublemaker? So Jesus sends the leper not to tell the priest that Jesus is a good guy, but to “show [him]self to the priest.” Jesus, like a good writer, lets the details speak for themselves: A man’s skin, once covered in bulging bumps and rough scales, is now smooth as a baby’s bottom. What does that say about Jesus? You, like the priest, can decide.

—Dan Everson is a Jesuit scholastic of the U.S. Central and Southern Province, studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Lord, by healing the man with leprosy and sending him to the priests, you allowed his life to be a witness to your healing power. May our lives also be witnesses of your love and grace to those we encounter.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Loving God, as we celebrate the feast of St. Peter, our first pope, and St. Paul, the apostle to the Gentiles, we ask you to give us the strength to live out the words of Pope Francis: “What gave me the strength to become a Jesuit is the sense of being a missionary.  To go out, to take part in the missions, to proclaim Jesus Christ. This is precisely our spirituality, to go out and spread the Gospel.”  May we each spread the Gospel through our words and our lives.  

—Jim and Lauren Gaffey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Imperfect Saints

Today our Church celebrates the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, apostles who led very different lives, but who shared the ultimate goals of bringing more people to Christ.  St. Peter was a fisherman who followed Jesus throughout his earthly ministry.  Peter seemed to alternate between really understanding what Jesus was saying, and completely missing the point.  We understand today’s Gospel as Jesus instituting the papacy under Peter.   Just four verses later, though, Jesus tells Peter to “get behind me, Satan.”  Peter wasn’t perfect, but Jesus chose him to lead his church on earth.  

Paul started out as a Pharisee and a vehement persecutor of Christians.  It took something as drastic as being knocked off a horse and struck blind for him to have a conversion and accept Christ.  Though he began as an opponent of Christ, his change of heart led him to become the “apostle to the Gentiles” and arguably one of the most important figures in Christianity.  

God took two people as they were, with all their sins and shortcomings, and stood with them as they led the early Church.  If God can forgive their sins and invite them to be co-laborers in his kingdom, what is God calling you to do?

—Jim and Lauren Gaffey.  Jim is a science teacher at Saint Ignatius College Prep.  Lauren is the Charis Ministries Program Coordinator for the Office of Ignatian Spirituality, and does work for the Midwest Jesuits.  

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Peter and St. Paul

Mt 16: 13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”

Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it.

I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


June 29, 2017

St. Peter and St. Paul

Mt 16: 13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”

Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it.

I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Imperfect Saints

Today our Church celebrates the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, apostles who led very different lives, but who shared the ultimate goals of bringing more people to Christ.  St. Peter was a fisherman who followed Jesus throughout his earthly ministry.  Peter seemed to alternate between really understanding what Jesus was saying, and completely missing the point.  We understand today’s Gospel as Jesus instituting the papacy under Peter.   Just four verses later, though, Jesus tells Peter to “get behind me, Satan.”  Peter wasn’t perfect, but Jesus chose him to lead his church on earth.  

Paul started out as a Pharisee and a vehement persecutor of Christians.  It took something as drastic as being knocked off a horse and struck blind for him to have a conversion and accept Christ.  Though he began as an opponent of Christ, his change of heart led him to become the “apostle to the Gentiles” and arguably one of the most important figures in Christianity.  

God took two people as they were, with all their sins and shortcomings, and stood with them as they led the early Church.  If God can forgive their sins and invite them to be co-laborers in his kingdom, what is God calling you to do?

—Jim and Lauren Gaffey.  Jim is a science teacher at Saint Ignatius College Prep.  Lauren is the Charis Ministries Program Coordinator for the Office of Ignatian Spirituality, and does work for the Midwest Jesuits.  

Prayer

Loving God, as we celebrate the feast of St. Peter, our first pope, and St. Paul, the apostle to the Gentiles, we ask you to give us the strength to live out the words of Pope Francis: “What gave me the strength to become a Jesuit is the sense of being a missionary.  To go out, to take part in the missions, to proclaim Jesus Christ. This is precisely our spirituality, to go out and spread the Gospel.”  May we each spread the Gospel through our words and our lives.  

—Jim and Lauren Gaffey

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord, help us to find prophets in our own lives who bear “good fruit” through their actions.  May we know them, may we emulate them, and may we ourselves be prophets to others.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


By their Fruits You will Know Them

“So by their fruits you will know them.”  Jesus’ analogy to his disciples in this seventh chapter of Matthew was probably very familiar to the people in this agricultural society.  Jesus invites us, here, to reflect on the words and actions of others, as well as our own.  Jesus seems to be warning us against false prophets, and perhaps also inviting us to examine the fruit we are bearing.

How can we tell true prophets? How can we identify those who may be hypocrites? St. Ignatius writes that “love ought to show itself in deeds, rather than words.”  Our words and intentions are important, but our actions are really the “fruit” of our interior life.

Is there an area where God is inviting me to examine and realign in my own life and actions? Who are true prophets in my life, who exemplify “good fruit,” that I seek to emulate?

—Colleen Chiacchere directs Magis Catholic Teacher Corps, the post-graduate teaching service program, at Creighton University.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

Lord, by healing the man with leprosy and sending him to the priests, you allowed his life to be a witness to your healing power. May our lives also be witnesses of your love and grace to those we encounter.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Show, Don’t Tell

The English teachers at my Jesuit high school had a maxim for descriptive writing: “Show, don’t tell.” Instead of writing, “Mr. Gibson looked tired,” one might show how Mr. Gibson looked: “Wrinkled bags hung under Mr. Gibson’s eyes.” Such concrete language allows the reader to picture the scene and draw her own conclusions about Mr. Gibson.

Jesus gives similar instructions to the ex-leper in today’s Gospel: Show, don’t tell. The priest is likely skeptical about Jesus: Is Jesus actually holy, or just a troublemaker? So Jesus sends the leper not to tell the priest that Jesus is a good guy, but to “show [him]self to the priest.” Jesus, like a good writer, lets the details speak for themselves: A man’s skin, once covered in bulging bumps and rough scales, is now smooth as a baby’s bottom. What does that say about Jesus? You, like the priest, can decide.

—Dan Everson is a Jesuit scholastic of the U.S. Central and Southern Province, studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

Mt 8: 1-4

When Jesus had come down from the mountain, great crowds followed him; and there was a leper who came to him and knelt before him, saying, “Lord, if you choose, you can make me clean.” He stretched out his hand and touched him, saying, “I do choose. Be made clean!” Immediately his leprosy was cleansed. Then Jesus said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone; but go, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


June 30, 2017

First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

Mt 8: 1-4

When Jesus had come down from the mountain, great crowds followed him; and there was a leper who came to him and knelt before him, saying, “Lord, if you choose, you can make me clean.” He stretched out his hand and touched him, saying, “I do choose. Be made clean!” Immediately his leprosy was cleansed. Then Jesus said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone; but go, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Show, Don’t Tell

The English teachers at my Jesuit high school had a maxim for descriptive writing: “Show, don’t tell.” Instead of writing, “Mr. Gibson looked tired,” one might show how Mr. Gibson looked: “Wrinkled bags hung under Mr. Gibson’s eyes.” Such concrete language allows the reader to picture the scene and draw her own conclusions about Mr. Gibson.

Jesus gives similar instructions to the ex-leper in today’s Gospel: Show, don’t tell. The priest is likely skeptical about Jesus: Is Jesus actually holy, or just a troublemaker? So Jesus sends the leper not to tell the priest that Jesus is a good guy, but to “show [him]self to the priest.” Jesus, like a good writer, lets the details speak for themselves: A man’s skin, once covered in bulging bumps and rough scales, is now smooth as a baby’s bottom. What does that say about Jesus? You, like the priest, can decide.

—Dan Everson is a Jesuit scholastic of the U.S. Central and Southern Province, studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Lord, by healing the man with leprosy and sending him to the priests, you allowed his life to be a witness to your healing power. May our lives also be witnesses of your love and grace to those we encounter.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Loving God, as we celebrate the feast of St. Peter, our first pope, and St. Paul, the apostle to the Gentiles, we ask you to give us the strength to live out the words of Pope Francis: “What gave me the strength to become a Jesuit is the sense of being a missionary.  To go out, to take part in the missions, to proclaim Jesus Christ. This is precisely our spirituality, to go out and spread the Gospel.”  May we each spread the Gospel through our words and our lives.  

—Jim and Lauren Gaffey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Imperfect Saints

Today our Church celebrates the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, apostles who led very different lives, but who shared the ultimate goals of bringing more people to Christ.  St. Peter was a fisherman who followed Jesus throughout his earthly ministry.  Peter seemed to alternate between really understanding what Jesus was saying, and completely missing the point.  We understand today’s Gospel as Jesus instituting the papacy under Peter.   Just four verses later, though, Jesus tells Peter to “get behind me, Satan.”  Peter wasn’t perfect, but Jesus chose him to lead his church on earth.  

Paul started out as a Pharisee and a vehement persecutor of Christians.  It took something as drastic as being knocked off a horse and struck blind for him to have a conversion and accept Christ.  Though he began as an opponent of Christ, his change of heart led him to become the “apostle to the Gentiles” and arguably one of the most important figures in Christianity.  

God took two people as they were, with all their sins and shortcomings, and stood with them as they led the early Church.  If God can forgive their sins and invite them to be co-laborers in his kingdom, what is God calling you to do?

—Jim and Lauren Gaffey.  Jim is a science teacher at Saint Ignatius College Prep.  Lauren is the Charis Ministries Program Coordinator for the Office of Ignatian Spirituality, and does work for the Midwest Jesuits.  

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Peter and St. Paul

Mt 16: 13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”

Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it.

I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


June 29, 2017

St. Peter and St. Paul

Mt 16: 13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”

Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it.

I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Imperfect Saints

Today our Church celebrates the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, apostles who led very different lives, but who shared the ultimate goals of bringing more people to Christ.  St. Peter was a fisherman who followed Jesus throughout his earthly ministry.  Peter seemed to alternate between really understanding what Jesus was saying, and completely missing the point.  We understand today’s Gospel as Jesus instituting the papacy under Peter.   Just four verses later, though, Jesus tells Peter to “get behind me, Satan.”  Peter wasn’t perfect, but Jesus chose him to lead his church on earth.  

Paul started out as a Pharisee and a vehement persecutor of Christians.  It took something as drastic as being knocked off a horse and struck blind for him to have a conversion and accept Christ.  Though he began as an opponent of Christ, his change of heart led him to become the “apostle to the Gentiles” and arguably one of the most important figures in Christianity.  

God took two people as they were, with all their sins and shortcomings, and stood with them as they led the early Church.  If God can forgive their sins and invite them to be co-laborers in his kingdom, what is God calling you to do?

—Jim and Lauren Gaffey.  Jim is a science teacher at Saint Ignatius College Prep.  Lauren is the Charis Ministries Program Coordinator for the Office of Ignatian Spirituality, and does work for the Midwest Jesuits.  

Prayer

Loving God, as we celebrate the feast of St. Peter, our first pope, and St. Paul, the apostle to the Gentiles, we ask you to give us the strength to live out the words of Pope Francis: “What gave me the strength to become a Jesuit is the sense of being a missionary.  To go out, to take part in the missions, to proclaim Jesus Christ. This is precisely our spirituality, to go out and spread the Gospel.”  May we each spread the Gospel through our words and our lives.  

—Jim and Lauren Gaffey

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord, help us to find prophets in our own lives who bear “good fruit” through their actions.  May we know them, may we emulate them, and may we ourselves be prophets to others.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


By their Fruits You will Know Them

“So by their fruits you will know them.”  Jesus’ analogy to his disciples in this seventh chapter of Matthew was probably very familiar to the people in this agricultural society.  Jesus invites us, here, to reflect on the words and actions of others, as well as our own.  Jesus seems to be warning us against false prophets, and perhaps also inviting us to examine the fruit we are bearing.

How can we tell true prophets? How can we identify those who may be hypocrites? St. Ignatius writes that “love ought to show itself in deeds, rather than words.”  Our words and intentions are important, but our actions are really the “fruit” of our interior life.

Is there an area where God is inviting me to examine and realign in my own life and actions? Who are true prophets in my life, who exemplify “good fruit,” that I seek to emulate?

—Colleen Chiacchere directs Magis Catholic Teacher Corps, the post-graduate teaching service program, at Creighton University.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!