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Prayer

Loving and faithful God, 
You give us endless opportunities to experience your love and grace. We ask for light and wisdom to recognize your presence in all situations and in all people. Help us to open our hearts and minds so we are prepared to welcome you in every moment of our day. We thank you for your unending mercy and love. 
Amen.

—Lauren Schwer

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Chances to encounter God

Stay awake! Be prepared! We truly do not know the day or hour that the Lord will come, nor how or through who/what circumstances. We have several options of how to approach this text. We could be anxious about this, so anxious that we spin in our minds and miss the gentle suggestions God offers us on how to be prepared or watch for grace. We could ignore the warning, the way we are able to ignore the suffering of those that are marginalized or experiencing violence.

We could also approach this as a reminder of the endless opportunities we have to encounter God. We can treat every person we encounter with respect and dignity, as we might encounter grace through them. We can meet the joyful times recognizing those moments as gifts so we might savor the grace we receive. We can meet challenges with an acknowledgement of our struggles, as well as the confidence that God is present within those times.

We can encounter those who are suffering from violence and hatred as a call to respond and seek to build the Kingdom. An element of Ignatian spirituality is the call to “Find God in All Things.” Today’s reading invites us to seek and find God in all things, so we might quiet the anxiety and indifference that prevents us from staying awake to the movement of God in our world.

—Lauren Schwer is the Associate Director of Campus Ministry at Loyola University Chicago.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mt 24: 42-51

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But understand this: if the owner of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into. Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour.

“Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time? Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions. But if that wicked slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,’ and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


August 31, 2017

Mt 24: 42-51

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But understand this: if the owner of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into. Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour.

“Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time? Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions. But if that wicked slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,’ and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Chances to encounter God

Stay awake! Be prepared! We truly do not know the day or hour that the Lord will come, nor how or through who/what circumstances. We have several options of how to approach this text. We could be anxious about this, so anxious that we spin in our minds and miss the gentle suggestions God offers us on how to be prepared or watch for grace. We could ignore the warning, the way we are able to ignore the suffering of those that are marginalized or experiencing violence.

We could also approach this as a reminder of the endless opportunities we have to encounter God. We can treat every person we encounter with respect and dignity, as we might encounter grace through them. We can meet the joyful times recognizing those moments as gifts so we might savor the grace we receive. We can meet challenges with an acknowledgement of our struggles, as well as the confidence that God is present within those times.

We can encounter those who are suffering from violence and hatred as a call to respond and seek to build the Kingdom. An element of Ignatian spirituality is the call to “Find God in All Things.” Today’s reading invites us to seek and find God in all things, so we might quiet the anxiety and indifference that prevents us from staying awake to the movement of God in our world.

—Lauren Schwer is the Associate Director of Campus Ministry at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Loving and faithful God,
You give us endless opportunities to experience your love and grace. We ask for light and wisdom to recognize your presence in all situations and in all people. Help us to open our hearts and minds so we are prepared to welcome you in every moment of our day. We thank you for your unending mercy and love.
Amen.

Lauren Schwer

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Dear Jesus, grant me a sincere loving heart to tell the truth to those I love, and an open, humble heart to listen to those truths about myself even when it can be painfully hard for me to hear.

—Dr. Sajit U. Kabadi

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Telling the truth with love

Prophets are above all truth tellers and we all need truth tellers in our lives who courageously, with love, always tell us the hard truths about ourselves. Sometimes we are initially unable to hear these truths and spurn the person, but over time we come to appreciate them so much. These situations are often difficult for both sides, but with God’s grace are very important.

—Dr. Sajit U. Kabadi is a chair of the Theology Department at Regis Jesuit High School in Colorado.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mt 23: 27-32

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you are like whitewashed tombs, which on the outside look beautiful, but inside they are full of the bones of the dead and of all kinds of filth. So you also on the outside look righteous to others, but inside you are full of hypocrisy and lawlessness.

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you build the tombs of the prophets and decorate the graves of the righteous,and you say, ‘If we had lived in the days of our ancestors, we would not have taken part with them in shedding the blood of the prophets.’ Thus you testify against yourselves that you are descendants of those who murdered the prophets. Fill up, then, the measure of your ancestors.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


August 30, 2017

Mt 23: 27-32

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you are like whitewashed tombs, which on the outside look beautiful, but inside they are full of the bones of the dead and of all kinds of filth. So you also on the outside look righteous to others, but inside you are full of hypocrisy and lawlessness.

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you build the tombs of the prophets and decorate the graves of the righteous,and you say, ‘If we had lived in the days of our ancestors, we would not have taken part with them in shedding the blood of the prophets.’ Thus you testify against yourselves that you are descendants of those who murdered the prophets. Fill up, then, the measure of your ancestors.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Telling the truth with love

Prophets are above all truth tellers and we all need truth tellers in our lives who courageously, with love, always tell us the hard truths about ourselves. Sometimes we are initially unable to hear these truths and spurn the person, but over time we come to appreciate them so much. These situations are often difficult for both sides, but with God’s grace are very important.

—Dr. Sajit U. Kabadi is a chair of the Theology Department at Regis Jesuit High School in Colorado.

Prayer

Dear Jesus, grant me a sincere loving heart to tell the truth to those I love, and an open, humble heart to listen to those truths about myself even when it can be painfully hard for me to hear.

—Dr. Sajit U. Kabadi

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God, you chose us to be the holy people
you love. Help us to clothe ourselves
with tenderhearted mercy, kindness,
humility, gentleness and patience.
Lead our souls in calmness and in peace.
Give us ears of understanding
and words of mercy. Hold our hands.
Allow your Love to guide our way.

—Joe Kraemer, SJ, inspired by Colossians 3:12

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Speaking as Christians

In 1987, the Federal Communications Commision voted 4-0 to repeal its own Fairness Doctrine. Created in 1949, these rules required licensees of public airwaves to discuss important public issues fairly and to present news to listeners honestly and responsibly.

Thirty years later, what we hear on the radio can seem a lot louder and not always fair. But whatever our personal or political opinions, we should be able to agree as Christians that the ways of Jesus are gentle and kind. Even when society removes its rules, we should strive to listen with charity and to speak with care, maybe most to those with whom we disagree.

There were Thessalonians in Paul’s time who accused his ministry of self interest. But Paul asks the Christians in Thessalonica to remember the gentle nature of his visits among them. Is Paul right to remind them of something they may have forgotten?

To whom could I speak more gently or approach more fairly today?

—Joe Kraemer, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the West Province currently beginning his Regency assignment in the Advancement Office in Los Gatos, California.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

Loving and faithful God, 
You give us endless opportunities to experience your love and grace. We ask for light and wisdom to recognize your presence in all situations and in all people. Help us to open our hearts and minds so we are prepared to welcome you in every moment of our day. We thank you for your unending mercy and love. 
Amen.

—Lauren Schwer

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Chances to encounter God

Stay awake! Be prepared! We truly do not know the day or hour that the Lord will come, nor how or through who/what circumstances. We have several options of how to approach this text. We could be anxious about this, so anxious that we spin in our minds and miss the gentle suggestions God offers us on how to be prepared or watch for grace. We could ignore the warning, the way we are able to ignore the suffering of those that are marginalized or experiencing violence.

We could also approach this as a reminder of the endless opportunities we have to encounter God. We can treat every person we encounter with respect and dignity, as we might encounter grace through them. We can meet the joyful times recognizing those moments as gifts so we might savor the grace we receive. We can meet challenges with an acknowledgement of our struggles, as well as the confidence that God is present within those times.

We can encounter those who are suffering from violence and hatred as a call to respond and seek to build the Kingdom. An element of Ignatian spirituality is the call to “Find God in All Things.” Today’s reading invites us to seek and find God in all things, so we might quiet the anxiety and indifference that prevents us from staying awake to the movement of God in our world.

—Lauren Schwer is the Associate Director of Campus Ministry at Loyola University Chicago.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mt 24: 42-51

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But understand this: if the owner of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into. Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour.

“Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time? Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions. But if that wicked slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,’ and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


August 31, 2017

Mt 24: 42-51

Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. But understand this: if the owner of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into. Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour.

“Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time? Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his possessions. But if that wicked slave says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,’ and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Chances to encounter God

Stay awake! Be prepared! We truly do not know the day or hour that the Lord will come, nor how or through who/what circumstances. We have several options of how to approach this text. We could be anxious about this, so anxious that we spin in our minds and miss the gentle suggestions God offers us on how to be prepared or watch for grace. We could ignore the warning, the way we are able to ignore the suffering of those that are marginalized or experiencing violence.

We could also approach this as a reminder of the endless opportunities we have to encounter God. We can treat every person we encounter with respect and dignity, as we might encounter grace through them. We can meet the joyful times recognizing those moments as gifts so we might savor the grace we receive. We can meet challenges with an acknowledgement of our struggles, as well as the confidence that God is present within those times.

We can encounter those who are suffering from violence and hatred as a call to respond and seek to build the Kingdom. An element of Ignatian spirituality is the call to “Find God in All Things.” Today’s reading invites us to seek and find God in all things, so we might quiet the anxiety and indifference that prevents us from staying awake to the movement of God in our world.

—Lauren Schwer is the Associate Director of Campus Ministry at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Loving and faithful God,
You give us endless opportunities to experience your love and grace. We ask for light and wisdom to recognize your presence in all situations and in all people. Help us to open our hearts and minds so we are prepared to welcome you in every moment of our day. We thank you for your unending mercy and love.
Amen.

Lauren Schwer

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Dear Jesus, grant me a sincere loving heart to tell the truth to those I love, and an open, humble heart to listen to those truths about myself even when it can be painfully hard for me to hear.

—Dr. Sajit U. Kabadi

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Telling the truth with love

Prophets are above all truth tellers and we all need truth tellers in our lives who courageously, with love, always tell us the hard truths about ourselves. Sometimes we are initially unable to hear these truths and spurn the person, but over time we come to appreciate them so much. These situations are often difficult for both sides, but with God’s grace are very important.

—Dr. Sajit U. Kabadi is a chair of the Theology Department at Regis Jesuit High School in Colorado.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mt 23: 27-32

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you are like whitewashed tombs, which on the outside look beautiful, but inside they are full of the bones of the dead and of all kinds of filth. So you also on the outside look righteous to others, but inside you are full of hypocrisy and lawlessness.

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you build the tombs of the prophets and decorate the graves of the righteous,and you say, ‘If we had lived in the days of our ancestors, we would not have taken part with them in shedding the blood of the prophets.’ Thus you testify against yourselves that you are descendants of those who murdered the prophets. Fill up, then, the measure of your ancestors.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


August 30, 2017

Mt 23: 27-32

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you are like whitewashed tombs, which on the outside look beautiful, but inside they are full of the bones of the dead and of all kinds of filth. So you also on the outside look righteous to others, but inside you are full of hypocrisy and lawlessness.

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you build the tombs of the prophets and decorate the graves of the righteous,and you say, ‘If we had lived in the days of our ancestors, we would not have taken part with them in shedding the blood of the prophets.’ Thus you testify against yourselves that you are descendants of those who murdered the prophets. Fill up, then, the measure of your ancestors.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Telling the truth with love

Prophets are above all truth tellers and we all need truth tellers in our lives who courageously, with love, always tell us the hard truths about ourselves. Sometimes we are initially unable to hear these truths and spurn the person, but over time we come to appreciate them so much. These situations are often difficult for both sides, but with God’s grace are very important.

—Dr. Sajit U. Kabadi is a chair of the Theology Department at Regis Jesuit High School in Colorado.

Prayer

Dear Jesus, grant me a sincere loving heart to tell the truth to those I love, and an open, humble heart to listen to those truths about myself even when it can be painfully hard for me to hear.

—Dr. Sajit U. Kabadi

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God, you chose us to be the holy people
you love. Help us to clothe ourselves
with tenderhearted mercy, kindness,
humility, gentleness and patience.
Lead our souls in calmness and in peace.
Give us ears of understanding
and words of mercy. Hold our hands.
Allow your Love to guide our way.

—Joe Kraemer, SJ, inspired by Colossians 3:12

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Speaking as Christians

In 1987, the Federal Communications Commision voted 4-0 to repeal its own Fairness Doctrine. Created in 1949, these rules required licensees of public airwaves to discuss important public issues fairly and to present news to listeners honestly and responsibly.

Thirty years later, what we hear on the radio can seem a lot louder and not always fair. But whatever our personal or political opinions, we should be able to agree as Christians that the ways of Jesus are gentle and kind. Even when society removes its rules, we should strive to listen with charity and to speak with care, maybe most to those with whom we disagree.

There were Thessalonians in Paul’s time who accused his ministry of self interest. But Paul asks the Christians in Thessalonica to remember the gentle nature of his visits among them. Is Paul right to remind them of something they may have forgotten?

To whom could I speak more gently or approach more fairly today?

—Joe Kraemer, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the West Province currently beginning his Regency assignment in the Advancement Office in Los Gatos, California.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!