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Prayer

Lord Jesus, help us to be bold in our work to bring about your kingdom.  As the tiny mustard seed becomes a large bush, so too may our actions be magnified in your service.  Strengthen the seeds of our faith that we may grow ever closer to you.  Amen

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Breaking out of the status quo

As the smallest seed, the mustard seed appears to be insignificant. Yet, Jesus tells us that it’s precisely this small seed that becomes a large bush. It is audacious, breaking the mold and making possible what appears to be impossible.

We too are to be like the mustard seed, patiently yet persistently nourishing our faith in the God of life and our commitment to bringing about the kingdom of God, being audacious in breaking out of the confines of the status quo, of the walls that separate us from each other. We are invited to place our faith and our hope in the smallest of seeds, trusting that with God we can reap abundant harvests, that we can collaborate with God in God’s liberating and redeeming mission.

How is God calling us to place our trust in what is seemingly impossible and to be bold in realizing the kingdom of God?

—Matt Ippel, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic in the Midwest Province studying philosophy at the Universidad Antonio Ruiz de Montoya in Lima, Peru.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Alphonsus Rodriguez, SJ

Lk 13: 18-21

He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.” And again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


October 31, 2017

St. Alphonsus Rodriguez, SJ

Lk 13: 18-21

He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.” And again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Breaking out of the status quo

As the smallest seed, the mustard seed appears to be insignificant. Yet, Jesus tells us that it’s precisely this small seed that becomes a large bush. It is audacious, breaking the mold and making possible what appears to be impossible.

We too are to be like the mustard seed, patiently yet persistently nourishing our faith in the God of life and our commitment to bringing about the kingdom of God, being audacious in breaking out of the confines of the status quo, of the walls that separate us from each other. We are invited to place our faith and our hope in the smallest of seeds, trusting that with God we can reap abundant harvests, that we can collaborate with God in God’s liberating and redeeming mission.

How is God calling us to place our trust in what is seemingly impossible and to be bold in realizing the kingdom of God?

—Matt Ippel, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic in the Midwest Province studying philosophy at the Universidad Antonio Ruiz de Montoya in Lima, Peru.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, help us to be bold in our work to bring about your kingdom.  As the tiny mustard seed becomes a large bush, so too may our actions be magnified in your service.  Strengthen the seeds of our faith that we may grow ever closer to you.  Amen

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

O Lord, I want to be completely transformed into Your mercy and to be Your living reflection. May the greatest of all divine attributes, that of Your unfathomable mercy, pass through my heart and soul to my neighbor.

—St. Faustina

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Entering into the chaos

“Mercy is the willingness to enter into the chaos of another.” – moral theologian James Keenan, SJ

Some years ago, I taught religion to sophomores – talk about entering into chaos! In all seriousness, they were curious, energetic, and thoughtful.

In exploring Jesus’ ministry, I asked, “What did Jesus do?”
“He saved people!”
“Ah. But how?”
“Because Jesus is God!”
“Yes… and what kinds of things did Jesus do that saved people?”
Hmm. This was harder to answer.

Today’s Gospel exemplifies how Jesus saves people. He liberates the woman from the spirit which cripples her by entering into her chaos. What did Jesus do for this woman? He SEES her, CALLS to her, SPEAKS to her, TOUCHES her. He does not “save” her from afar – he comes near, close enough to lay his hands on her.

Into what chaos of my life do I need to make room for God to enter?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division; she serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House and the Advisory Board of Jesuit Connections.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Blessed Dominic Collins, SJ

Lk 13: 10-17

Now he was teaching in one of the synagogues on the sabbath. And just then there appeared a woman with a spirit that had crippled her for eighteen years. She was bent over and was quite unable to stand up straight. When Jesus saw her, he called her over and said, “Woman, you are set free from your ailment.” When he laid his hands on her, immediately she stood up straight and began praising God.

But the leader of the synagogue, indignant because Jesus had cured on the sabbath, kept saying to the crowd, “There are six days on which work ought to be done; come on those days and be cured, and not on the sabbath day.”But the Lord answered him and said, “You hypocrites! Does not each of you on the sabbath untie his ox or his donkey from the manger, and lead it away to give it water? And ought not this woman, a daughter of Abraham whom Satan bound for eighteen long years, be set free from this bondage on the sabbath day?”

When he said this, all his opponents were put to shame; and the entire crowd was rejoicing at all the wonderful things that he was doing.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


October 30, 2017

Blessed Dominic Collins, SJ

Lk 13: 10-17

Now he was teaching in one of the synagogues on the sabbath. And just then there appeared a woman with a spirit that had crippled her for eighteen years. She was bent over and was quite unable to stand up straight. When Jesus saw her, he called her over and said, “Woman, you are set free from your ailment.” When he laid his hands on her, immediately she stood up straight and began praising God.

But the leader of the synagogue, indignant because Jesus had cured on the sabbath, kept saying to the crowd, “There are six days on which work ought to be done; come on those days and be cured, and not on the sabbath day.”But the Lord answered him and said, “You hypocrites! Does not each of you on the sabbath untie his ox or his donkey from the manger, and lead it away to give it water? And ought not this woman, a daughter of Abraham whom Satan bound for eighteen long years, be set free from this bondage on the sabbath day?”

When he said this, all his opponents were put to shame; and the entire crowd was rejoicing at all the wonderful things that he was doing.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Entering into the chaos

“Mercy is the willingness to enter into the chaos of another.” – moral theologian James Keenan, SJ

Some years ago, I taught religion to sophomores – talk about entering into chaos! In all seriousness, they were curious, energetic, and thoughtful.

In exploring Jesus’ ministry, I asked, “What did Jesus do?”
“He saved people!”
“Ah. But how?”
“Because Jesus is God!”
“Yes… and what kinds of things did Jesus do that saved people?”
Hmm. This was harder to answer.

Today’s Gospel exemplifies how Jesus saves people. He liberates the woman from the spirit which cripples her by entering into her chaos. What did Jesus do for this woman? He SEES her, CALLS to her, SPEAKS to her, TOUCHES her. He does not “save” her from afar – he comes near, close enough to lay his hands on her.

Into what chaos of my life do I need to make room for God to enter?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division; she serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House and the Advisory Board of Jesuit Connections.

Prayer

O Lord, I want to be completely transformed into Your mercy and to be Your living reflection. May the greatest of all divine attributes, that of Your unfathomable mercy, pass through my heart and soul to my neighbor.

—St. Faustina

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Dear God, lover of widows, orphans, strangers, and the poor, give us the courage to practice the radical hospitality that you called the Jewish people to, and which was modeled by your son Jesus, who welcomed the outcast and taught us to do the same. Give us the courage to open our homes to the poor and needy. Help us to overcome fear, so as to respond to the needs of those who come to us fleeing oppression and terror. May those who have had their home taken from them find a home in our hearts, our homes, and our communities. Teach us, like you, to boldly love those whom others would exclude.  Amen.

—Fr. Mark Mossa, SJ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Radical hospitality for refugees

“You shall not molest or oppress an alien, for you were once aliens yourselves in the land of Egypt.”

In the last couple of years, my ministry has grown to include refugees. I am certain of my duty as a Christian to welcome and befriend them. This is made abundantly clear in this reading from Exodus. So, it saddens me, when out of fear or prejudice, people forget this duty, and the fact that many who came to our country were similarly displaced. Refugees are those whose home has become inhospitable. And we must understand, as the poet Warsan Shire writes, “No one puts their children in a boat unless the water is safer than the land.”

Jesus says, “love your neighbor as yourself.” Throughout the Gospel, Jesus was offering hospitality to tax collectors, sinners, foreigners and strangers. I am increasingly convinced that one of our greatest calls in these days is to risk and rejoice in just this kind of radical hospitality.

—Fr. Mark Mossa, SJ, is the Director of Campus Ministry at Spring Hill College in Mobile, AL.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

Lord Jesus, help us to be bold in our work to bring about your kingdom.  As the tiny mustard seed becomes a large bush, so too may our actions be magnified in your service.  Strengthen the seeds of our faith that we may grow ever closer to you.  Amen

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Breaking out of the status quo

As the smallest seed, the mustard seed appears to be insignificant. Yet, Jesus tells us that it’s precisely this small seed that becomes a large bush. It is audacious, breaking the mold and making possible what appears to be impossible.

We too are to be like the mustard seed, patiently yet persistently nourishing our faith in the God of life and our commitment to bringing about the kingdom of God, being audacious in breaking out of the confines of the status quo, of the walls that separate us from each other. We are invited to place our faith and our hope in the smallest of seeds, trusting that with God we can reap abundant harvests, that we can collaborate with God in God’s liberating and redeeming mission.

How is God calling us to place our trust in what is seemingly impossible and to be bold in realizing the kingdom of God?

—Matt Ippel, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic in the Midwest Province studying philosophy at the Universidad Antonio Ruiz de Montoya in Lima, Peru.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Alphonsus Rodriguez, SJ

Lk 13: 18-21

He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.” And again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


October 31, 2017

St. Alphonsus Rodriguez, SJ

Lk 13: 18-21

He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.” And again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Breaking out of the status quo

As the smallest seed, the mustard seed appears to be insignificant. Yet, Jesus tells us that it’s precisely this small seed that becomes a large bush. It is audacious, breaking the mold and making possible what appears to be impossible.

We too are to be like the mustard seed, patiently yet persistently nourishing our faith in the God of life and our commitment to bringing about the kingdom of God, being audacious in breaking out of the confines of the status quo, of the walls that separate us from each other. We are invited to place our faith and our hope in the smallest of seeds, trusting that with God we can reap abundant harvests, that we can collaborate with God in God’s liberating and redeeming mission.

How is God calling us to place our trust in what is seemingly impossible and to be bold in realizing the kingdom of God?

—Matt Ippel, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic in the Midwest Province studying philosophy at the Universidad Antonio Ruiz de Montoya in Lima, Peru.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, help us to be bold in our work to bring about your kingdom.  As the tiny mustard seed becomes a large bush, so too may our actions be magnified in your service.  Strengthen the seeds of our faith that we may grow ever closer to you.  Amen

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

O Lord, I want to be completely transformed into Your mercy and to be Your living reflection. May the greatest of all divine attributes, that of Your unfathomable mercy, pass through my heart and soul to my neighbor.

—St. Faustina

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Entering into the chaos

“Mercy is the willingness to enter into the chaos of another.” – moral theologian James Keenan, SJ

Some years ago, I taught religion to sophomores – talk about entering into chaos! In all seriousness, they were curious, energetic, and thoughtful.

In exploring Jesus’ ministry, I asked, “What did Jesus do?”
“He saved people!”
“Ah. But how?”
“Because Jesus is God!”
“Yes… and what kinds of things did Jesus do that saved people?”
Hmm. This was harder to answer.

Today’s Gospel exemplifies how Jesus saves people. He liberates the woman from the spirit which cripples her by entering into her chaos. What did Jesus do for this woman? He SEES her, CALLS to her, SPEAKS to her, TOUCHES her. He does not “save” her from afar – he comes near, close enough to lay his hands on her.

Into what chaos of my life do I need to make room for God to enter?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division; she serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House and the Advisory Board of Jesuit Connections.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Blessed Dominic Collins, SJ

Lk 13: 10-17

Now he was teaching in one of the synagogues on the sabbath. And just then there appeared a woman with a spirit that had crippled her for eighteen years. She was bent over and was quite unable to stand up straight. When Jesus saw her, he called her over and said, “Woman, you are set free from your ailment.” When he laid his hands on her, immediately she stood up straight and began praising God.

But the leader of the synagogue, indignant because Jesus had cured on the sabbath, kept saying to the crowd, “There are six days on which work ought to be done; come on those days and be cured, and not on the sabbath day.”But the Lord answered him and said, “You hypocrites! Does not each of you on the sabbath untie his ox or his donkey from the manger, and lead it away to give it water? And ought not this woman, a daughter of Abraham whom Satan bound for eighteen long years, be set free from this bondage on the sabbath day?”

When he said this, all his opponents were put to shame; and the entire crowd was rejoicing at all the wonderful things that he was doing.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


October 30, 2017

Blessed Dominic Collins, SJ

Lk 13: 10-17

Now he was teaching in one of the synagogues on the sabbath. And just then there appeared a woman with a spirit that had crippled her for eighteen years. She was bent over and was quite unable to stand up straight. When Jesus saw her, he called her over and said, “Woman, you are set free from your ailment.” When he laid his hands on her, immediately she stood up straight and began praising God.

But the leader of the synagogue, indignant because Jesus had cured on the sabbath, kept saying to the crowd, “There are six days on which work ought to be done; come on those days and be cured, and not on the sabbath day.”But the Lord answered him and said, “You hypocrites! Does not each of you on the sabbath untie his ox or his donkey from the manger, and lead it away to give it water? And ought not this woman, a daughter of Abraham whom Satan bound for eighteen long years, be set free from this bondage on the sabbath day?”

When he said this, all his opponents were put to shame; and the entire crowd was rejoicing at all the wonderful things that he was doing.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Entering into the chaos

“Mercy is the willingness to enter into the chaos of another.” – moral theologian James Keenan, SJ

Some years ago, I taught religion to sophomores – talk about entering into chaos! In all seriousness, they were curious, energetic, and thoughtful.

In exploring Jesus’ ministry, I asked, “What did Jesus do?”
“He saved people!”
“Ah. But how?”
“Because Jesus is God!”
“Yes… and what kinds of things did Jesus do that saved people?”
Hmm. This was harder to answer.

Today’s Gospel exemplifies how Jesus saves people. He liberates the woman from the spirit which cripples her by entering into her chaos. What did Jesus do for this woman? He SEES her, CALLS to her, SPEAKS to her, TOUCHES her. He does not “save” her from afar – he comes near, close enough to lay his hands on her.

Into what chaos of my life do I need to make room for God to enter?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division; she serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House and the Advisory Board of Jesuit Connections.

Prayer

O Lord, I want to be completely transformed into Your mercy and to be Your living reflection. May the greatest of all divine attributes, that of Your unfathomable mercy, pass through my heart and soul to my neighbor.

—St. Faustina

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Dear God, lover of widows, orphans, strangers, and the poor, give us the courage to practice the radical hospitality that you called the Jewish people to, and which was modeled by your son Jesus, who welcomed the outcast and taught us to do the same. Give us the courage to open our homes to the poor and needy. Help us to overcome fear, so as to respond to the needs of those who come to us fleeing oppression and terror. May those who have had their home taken from them find a home in our hearts, our homes, and our communities. Teach us, like you, to boldly love those whom others would exclude.  Amen.

—Fr. Mark Mossa, SJ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Radical hospitality for refugees

“You shall not molest or oppress an alien, for you were once aliens yourselves in the land of Egypt.”

In the last couple of years, my ministry has grown to include refugees. I am certain of my duty as a Christian to welcome and befriend them. This is made abundantly clear in this reading from Exodus. So, it saddens me, when out of fear or prejudice, people forget this duty, and the fact that many who came to our country were similarly displaced. Refugees are those whose home has become inhospitable. And we must understand, as the poet Warsan Shire writes, “No one puts their children in a boat unless the water is safer than the land.”

Jesus says, “love your neighbor as yourself.” Throughout the Gospel, Jesus was offering hospitality to tax collectors, sinners, foreigners and strangers. I am increasingly convinced that one of our greatest calls in these days is to risk and rejoice in just this kind of radical hospitality.

—Fr. Mark Mossa, SJ, is the Director of Campus Ministry at Spring Hill College in Mobile, AL.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!