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Prayer

Lord, grant me the grace to know you more intimately, to love you more intensely, and so to follow you more closely.

—Based on Spiritual Exercise #140 of St. Ignatius of Loyola

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Putting down my nets

St. Ignatius invites us to use our imaginations to pray ourselves right into the Gospels. By using all of our senses, we see, hear, taste, smell, and feel the story unfold. When I pray with today’s text, I imagine myself as Zebedee, in my boat on the Sea of Galilee with my sons. I see Jesus walking along the shore. I feel the breeze blowing across the water. I smell the wet fishing nets.

Suddenly, I hear Jesus calling to Peter and Andrew, to James and John, “Come, follow me!” I watch as all four immediately leave what they are doing and follow Jesus. And I think, “Yo, guys—what about me? What am I supposed to do with this boat all by myself?”

Finally I wonder, what is God calling me to do? Today. Now. Am I ready to “put down my nets” and respond wholeheartedly to God’s call?

—Michael Sarafolean is an Ignatian Associate in St. Paul, MN, and a member of Saint Thomas More Catholic Community, the Jesuit parish of the Twin Cities.

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Andrew, apostle

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.”

Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


November 30, 2017

St. Andrew, apostle

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.”

Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Putting down my nets

St. Ignatius invites us to use our imaginations to pray ourselves right into the Gospels. By using all of our senses, we see, hear, taste, smell, and feel the story unfold. When I pray with today’s text, I imagine myself as Zebedee, in my boat on the Sea of Galilee with my sons. I see Jesus walking along the shore. I feel the breeze blowing across the water. I smell the wet fishing nets.

Suddenly, I hear Jesus calling to Peter and Andrew, to James and John, “Come, follow me!” I watch as all four immediately leave what they are doing and follow Jesus. And I think, “Yo, guys—what about me? What am I supposed to do with this boat all by myself?”

Finally I wonder, what is God calling me to do? Today. Now. Am I ready to “put down my nets” and respond wholeheartedly to God’s call?

—Michael Sarafolean is an Ignatian Associate in St. Paul, MN, and a member of Saint Thomas More Catholic Community, the Jesuit parish of the Twin Cities.

Prayer

Lord, grant me the grace to know you more intimately, to love you more intensely, and so to follow you more closely.

—Based on Spiritual Exercise #140 of St. Ignatius of Loyola

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Holy Wisdom,
Who calls us to love and speak truth,
Help us to be rooted in You,
Especially in moments of vulnerability and challenge,
Through Jesus our Companion,
Amen.

—Katie Davis

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Speak truth in love

Arrest. Persecution. Testifying before kings. Death. How privileged many of us are to live lives of faith free from such terrifying threats. We do not need to be martyrs, however, to face the real risk of discipleship. In moments major and mundane, we encounter invitations to speak truth to power – to stand on the side of the good and the loving, even when doing so might make us feel vulnerable and alone. This can cause complications at work and at home, with friends and others with whom we are at odds. The challenge for us disciples-in-progress is to trust, deep in our bones, God’s wisdom. If we stay rooted in that wisdom, the Spirit will grant us the words to speak.

How is God calling me to speak truth in love today? How can I trust the Spirit to guide my voice at home, at work, and in the world?

—Katie Davis is a former member of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps and JVC Magis currently working as a Chaplain and Religious Studies teacher at Saint Ignatius College Prep in Chicago.  She serves on the Advisory Board for Jesuit Connections in Chicago and the Chicago Women’s Team for the Ignatian Spirituality Project.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Lk 21: 12-19

“But before all this occurs, they will arrest you and persecute you; they will hand you over to synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and governors because of my name. This will give you an opportunity to testify. So make up your minds not to prepare your defense in advance; for I will give you words and a wisdom that none of your opponents will be able to withstand or contradict.

You will be betrayed even by parents and brothers, by relatives and friends; and they will put some of you to death. You will be hated by all because of my name. But not a hair of your head will perish. By your endurance you will gain your souls.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


November 29, 2017

Lk 21: 12-19

“But before all this occurs, they will arrest you and persecute you; they will hand you over to synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and governors because of my name. This will give you an opportunity to testify. So make up your minds not to prepare your defense in advance; for I will give you words and a wisdom that none of your opponents will be able to withstand or contradict.

You will be betrayed even by parents and brothers, by relatives and friends; and they will put some of you to death. You will be hated by all because of my name. But not a hair of your head will perish. By your endurance you will gain your souls.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Speak truth in love

Arrest. Persecution. Testifying before kings. Death. How privileged many of us are to live lives of faith free from such terrifying threats. We do not need to be martyrs, however, to face the real risk of discipleship. In moments major and mundane, we encounter invitations to speak truth to power – to stand on the side of the good and the loving, even when doing so might make us feel vulnerable and alone. This can cause complications at work and at home, with friends and others with whom we are at odds. The challenge for us disciples-in-progress is to trust, deep in our bones, God’s wisdom. If we stay rooted in that wisdom, the Spirit will grant us the words to speak.

How is God calling me to speak truth in love today? How can I trust the Spirit to guide my voice at home, at work, and in the world?

—Katie Davis is a former member of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps and JVC Magis currently working as a Chaplain and Religious Studies teacher at Saint Ignatius College Prep in Chicago.  She serves on the Advisory Board for Jesuit Connections in Chicago and the Chicago Women’s Team for the Ignatian Spirituality Project.

Prayer

Holy Wisdom,
Who calls us to love and speak truth,
Help us to be rooted in You,
Especially in moments of vulnerability and challenge,
Through Jesus our Companion,
Amen.

—Katie Davis

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Take my heart, O Lord, take my hopes and dreams.
Take my mind with all its plans and schemes.
Give me nothing more than your love and grace.
These alone, O God, are enough for me.

—From These Alone Are Enough by Dan Schutte, based on the Suscipe of St. Ignatius Loyola, © 2004, published by OCP

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Travelling light

Toward the end of my first year as a Jesuit novice, I was sent out on my poverty pilgrimage: a thirty-six day journey around the country with empty pockets, learning to count on the generosity of others to keep me fed and moving along. I was advised to “travel light” to learn greater dependence on God whatever I might encounter along the way. Fearful at first, I quickly found that traveling light made it a lot easier to turn to God with my needs as they came up.

In today’s Gospel, Jesus doesn’t preach that the future will be free from upsetting surprises, but he does reassure his audience not to be led by their fears. When it feels like the earth opens beneath us with a scary diagnosis, or we weather a famine of sadness or despair, or feel plagued by loneliness or depression, a close friendship with the Lord is our lifeline in times of trial.

—Joe Kraemer, SJ, is a scholastic of the West Province currently in Regency in the Advancement Office at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos, California.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

Lord, grant me the grace to know you more intimately, to love you more intensely, and so to follow you more closely.

—Based on Spiritual Exercise #140 of St. Ignatius of Loyola

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Putting down my nets

St. Ignatius invites us to use our imaginations to pray ourselves right into the Gospels. By using all of our senses, we see, hear, taste, smell, and feel the story unfold. When I pray with today’s text, I imagine myself as Zebedee, in my boat on the Sea of Galilee with my sons. I see Jesus walking along the shore. I feel the breeze blowing across the water. I smell the wet fishing nets.

Suddenly, I hear Jesus calling to Peter and Andrew, to James and John, “Come, follow me!” I watch as all four immediately leave what they are doing and follow Jesus. And I think, “Yo, guys—what about me? What am I supposed to do with this boat all by myself?”

Finally I wonder, what is God calling me to do? Today. Now. Am I ready to “put down my nets” and respond wholeheartedly to God’s call?

—Michael Sarafolean is an Ignatian Associate in St. Paul, MN, and a member of Saint Thomas More Catholic Community, the Jesuit parish of the Twin Cities.

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Andrew, apostle

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.”

Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


November 30, 2017

St. Andrew, apostle

Mt 4: 18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.”

Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Putting down my nets

St. Ignatius invites us to use our imaginations to pray ourselves right into the Gospels. By using all of our senses, we see, hear, taste, smell, and feel the story unfold. When I pray with today’s text, I imagine myself as Zebedee, in my boat on the Sea of Galilee with my sons. I see Jesus walking along the shore. I feel the breeze blowing across the water. I smell the wet fishing nets.

Suddenly, I hear Jesus calling to Peter and Andrew, to James and John, “Come, follow me!” I watch as all four immediately leave what they are doing and follow Jesus. And I think, “Yo, guys—what about me? What am I supposed to do with this boat all by myself?”

Finally I wonder, what is God calling me to do? Today. Now. Am I ready to “put down my nets” and respond wholeheartedly to God’s call?

—Michael Sarafolean is an Ignatian Associate in St. Paul, MN, and a member of Saint Thomas More Catholic Community, the Jesuit parish of the Twin Cities.

Prayer

Lord, grant me the grace to know you more intimately, to love you more intensely, and so to follow you more closely.

—Based on Spiritual Exercise #140 of St. Ignatius of Loyola

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Holy Wisdom,
Who calls us to love and speak truth,
Help us to be rooted in You,
Especially in moments of vulnerability and challenge,
Through Jesus our Companion,
Amen.

—Katie Davis

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Speak truth in love

Arrest. Persecution. Testifying before kings. Death. How privileged many of us are to live lives of faith free from such terrifying threats. We do not need to be martyrs, however, to face the real risk of discipleship. In moments major and mundane, we encounter invitations to speak truth to power – to stand on the side of the good and the loving, even when doing so might make us feel vulnerable and alone. This can cause complications at work and at home, with friends and others with whom we are at odds. The challenge for us disciples-in-progress is to trust, deep in our bones, God’s wisdom. If we stay rooted in that wisdom, the Spirit will grant us the words to speak.

How is God calling me to speak truth in love today? How can I trust the Spirit to guide my voice at home, at work, and in the world?

—Katie Davis is a former member of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps and JVC Magis currently working as a Chaplain and Religious Studies teacher at Saint Ignatius College Prep in Chicago.  She serves on the Advisory Board for Jesuit Connections in Chicago and the Chicago Women’s Team for the Ignatian Spirituality Project.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Lk 21: 12-19

“But before all this occurs, they will arrest you and persecute you; they will hand you over to synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and governors because of my name. This will give you an opportunity to testify. So make up your minds not to prepare your defense in advance; for I will give you words and a wisdom that none of your opponents will be able to withstand or contradict.

You will be betrayed even by parents and brothers, by relatives and friends; and they will put some of you to death. You will be hated by all because of my name. But not a hair of your head will perish. By your endurance you will gain your souls.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


November 29, 2017

Lk 21: 12-19

“But before all this occurs, they will arrest you and persecute you; they will hand you over to synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and governors because of my name. This will give you an opportunity to testify. So make up your minds not to prepare your defense in advance; for I will give you words and a wisdom that none of your opponents will be able to withstand or contradict.

You will be betrayed even by parents and brothers, by relatives and friends; and they will put some of you to death. You will be hated by all because of my name. But not a hair of your head will perish. By your endurance you will gain your souls.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Speak truth in love

Arrest. Persecution. Testifying before kings. Death. How privileged many of us are to live lives of faith free from such terrifying threats. We do not need to be martyrs, however, to face the real risk of discipleship. In moments major and mundane, we encounter invitations to speak truth to power – to stand on the side of the good and the loving, even when doing so might make us feel vulnerable and alone. This can cause complications at work and at home, with friends and others with whom we are at odds. The challenge for us disciples-in-progress is to trust, deep in our bones, God’s wisdom. If we stay rooted in that wisdom, the Spirit will grant us the words to speak.

How is God calling me to speak truth in love today? How can I trust the Spirit to guide my voice at home, at work, and in the world?

—Katie Davis is a former member of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps and JVC Magis currently working as a Chaplain and Religious Studies teacher at Saint Ignatius College Prep in Chicago.  She serves on the Advisory Board for Jesuit Connections in Chicago and the Chicago Women’s Team for the Ignatian Spirituality Project.

Prayer

Holy Wisdom,
Who calls us to love and speak truth,
Help us to be rooted in You,
Especially in moments of vulnerability and challenge,
Through Jesus our Companion,
Amen.

—Katie Davis

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Take my heart, O Lord, take my hopes and dreams.
Take my mind with all its plans and schemes.
Give me nothing more than your love and grace.
These alone, O God, are enough for me.

—From These Alone Are Enough by Dan Schutte, based on the Suscipe of St. Ignatius Loyola, © 2004, published by OCP

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Travelling light

Toward the end of my first year as a Jesuit novice, I was sent out on my poverty pilgrimage: a thirty-six day journey around the country with empty pockets, learning to count on the generosity of others to keep me fed and moving along. I was advised to “travel light” to learn greater dependence on God whatever I might encounter along the way. Fearful at first, I quickly found that traveling light made it a lot easier to turn to God with my needs as they came up.

In today’s Gospel, Jesus doesn’t preach that the future will be free from upsetting surprises, but he does reassure his audience not to be led by their fears. When it feels like the earth opens beneath us with a scary diagnosis, or we weather a famine of sadness or despair, or feel plagued by loneliness or depression, a close friendship with the Lord is our lifeline in times of trial.

—Joe Kraemer, SJ, is a scholastic of the West Province currently in Regency in the Advancement Office at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos, California.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!