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The Advent mystery is the beginning of the end of all within us that is not yet Christ.

—Thomas Merton

 

 

 

 

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Prepare the Way of the Lord

We are at the halfway point of Advent 2018. As Christmas shopping and holiday preparations consume more of my time, how am I doing as I “prepare the way of the Lord”? And what exactly does all this “preparing” mean for me personally? Amidst the Christmas rush, is there some person or situation that needs more of my time and attention? Is there some real family need that I am neglecting?

Today’s verses from Psalm 80 invite me to “take care of this vine you have planted.” In what personal, practical ways is God inviting me to turn to him? During these Advent days just how is the Lord trying to show me his face? And in what particular “Advent ways” am I nurturing God’s gift of faith in my heart–this “vine” that God has planted?

—The Jesuit Prayer team at St. Camillus

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Ps 80:2AC, 3B, 15-16, 18-19

R. (4) Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

O shepherd of Israel, hearken,

From your throne upon the cherubim, shine forth.

Rouse your power.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

Once again, O LORD of hosts,

look down from heaven, and see;

Take care of this vine,

and protect what your right hand has planted

the son of man whom you yourself made strong.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

May your help be with the man of your right hand,

with the son of man whom you yourself made strong.

Then we will no more withdraw from you;

give us new life, and we will call upon your name.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States, second typical edition, Copyright © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; Psalm refrain © 1968, 1981, 1997, International Committee on English in the Liturgy, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


December 15, 2018

Ps 80:2AC, 3B, 15-16, 18-19

R. (4) Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

O shepherd of Israel, hearken,

From your throne upon the cherubim, shine forth.

Rouse your power.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

Once again, O LORD of hosts,

look down from heaven, and see;

Take care of this vine,

and protect what your right hand has planted

the son of man whom you yourself made strong.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

May your help be with the man of your right hand,

with the son of man whom you yourself made strong.

Then we will no more withdraw from you;

give us new life, and we will call upon your name.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States, second typical edition, Copyright © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; Psalm refrain © 1968, 1981, 1997, International Committee on English in the Liturgy, Inc. All rights reserved.

Prepare the Way of the Lord

We are at the halfway point of Advent 2018. As Christmas shopping and holiday preparations consume more of my time, how am I doing as I “prepare the way of the Lord”? And what exactly does all this “preparing” mean for me personally? Amidst the Christmas rush, is there some person or situation that needs more of my time and attention? Is there some real family need that I am neglecting?

Today’s verses from Psalm 80 invite me to “take care of this vine you have planted.” In what personal, practical ways is God inviting me to turn to him? During these Advent days just how is the Lord trying to show me his face? And in what particular “Advent ways” am I nurturing God’s gift of faith in my heart–this “vine” that God has planted?

—The Jesuit Prayer team at St. Camillus

Prayer

The Advent mystery is the beginning of the end of all within us that is not yet Christ.

—Thomas Merton

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God, You are more patient than the most patient parent. Help me to allow myself to be loved by you. Teach me for my own good. Lead me in the ways I should go. Guide my feet in the way of peace.

Amen.  

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Teaching us for our own good

Clunk, shuffle. “Take off mama’s boots and put them by the door.”

Twist, squeak. “Let me adjust the bathtub knobs.”

News from day care. “We do not bite people.”

I don’t mean to be overbearing. But I see what’s happening, and I don’t want my daughter to fall, to burn herself, or to hurt other people.

With boundaries and instructions, I try to teach her for her own good. Yet, I cannot protect her from every physical and emotional hurt in this life. Instead, I try to show her the way she should go and also hold space for her to explore, take risks and grow.

As a parent of a two-year old, I can begin to imagine what God may feel like in this passage. How many times must God have said to humanity, “O that you had paid attention…!”

What is God teaching me for my own good?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division and serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House.

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. John of the Cross

Is 48: 17-19

Thus says the Lord, your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel: I am the Lord your God, who teaches you for your own good, who leads you in the way you should go. O that you had paid attention to my commandments!

Then your prosperity would have been like a river, and your success like the waves of the sea; your offspring would have been like the sand, and your descendants like its grains; their name would never be cut off or destroyed from before me.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


December 14, 2018

St. John of the Cross

Is 48: 17-19

Thus says the Lord, your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel: I am the Lord your God, who teaches you for your own good, who leads you in the way you should go. O that you had paid attention to my commandments!

Then your prosperity would have been like a river, and your success like the waves of the sea; your offspring would have been like the sand, and your descendants like its grains; their name would never be cut off or destroyed from before me.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Teaching us for our own good

Clunk, shuffle. “Take off mama’s boots and put them by the door.”

Twist, squeak. “Let me adjust the bathtub knobs.”

News from day care. “We do not bite people.”

I don’t mean to be overbearing. But I see what’s happening, and I don’t want my daughter to fall, to burn herself, or to hurt other people.

With boundaries and instructions, I try to teach her for her own good. Yet, I cannot protect her from every physical and emotional hurt in this life. Instead, I try to show her the way she should go and also hold space for her to explore, take risks and grow.

As a parent of a two-year old, I can begin to imagine what God may feel like in this passage. How many times must God have said to humanity, “O that you had paid attention…!”

What is God teaching me for my own good?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division and serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House.

Prayer

God, You are more patient than the most patient parent. Help me to allow myself to be loved by you. Teach me for my own good. Lead me in the ways I should go. Guide my feet in the way of peace.

Amen.  

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Hearing Better Voices

We make a pause
amid many voices–
some innocent and some seductive,
some violent and some coercive,
some forgiven and genuine,
some not.
Amid this cacophony that pulls us
in many directions,
we have these old voices of your prophets;
these voices attest to
your fierce self,
your severe summons,
your generous promise,
your abiding presence.

Give us good ears,
perchance you have a word for us tonight;
Give us grace and courage to listen,
to answer,
to care,
and to rejoice,
that we may be more fully your people.

—Walter Brueggemann from Prayers for a Privileged People

 

 

  

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


God will be all in all

Before I read this prophecy to my third graders last weekend, I asked some questions:

Me: “What is Advent all about?”

Child: “Preparing for Jesus’s birthday.”

Me: “True. We’re also preparing for something else. Does anyone know?”

Child: “When Jesus comes back and God will be all in all.”  

Then we read the prophecy and looked for clues of either event. Despite the tough vocabulary, at least one child listened to the end. She said this was a Parousia prophecy. “The end says that everybody sees and knows that God made everything. All people – Catholics, Jewish people, Hindus – all together seeing and knowing God.” After catching my breath – she actually said Hindus – I realized I could probably read the passage a little closer. Take a few minutes to read it again to find something that you missed about the time when God will be all in all.

—Mark Bartholet is a John Carroll University alumnus who coordinates the Contemplative Leaders in Action program and Catechesis of the Good Shepherd at St. Peter Catholic Church, the Jesuit parish in Charlotte, NC.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

The Advent mystery is the beginning of the end of all within us that is not yet Christ.

—Thomas Merton

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prepare the Way of the Lord

We are at the halfway point of Advent 2018. As Christmas shopping and holiday preparations consume more of my time, how am I doing as I “prepare the way of the Lord”? And what exactly does all this “preparing” mean for me personally? Amidst the Christmas rush, is there some person or situation that needs more of my time and attention? Is there some real family need that I am neglecting?

Today’s verses from Psalm 80 invite me to “take care of this vine you have planted.” In what personal, practical ways is God inviting me to turn to him? During these Advent days just how is the Lord trying to show me his face? And in what particular “Advent ways” am I nurturing God’s gift of faith in my heart–this “vine” that God has planted?

—The Jesuit Prayer team at St. Camillus

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Ps 80:2AC, 3B, 15-16, 18-19

R. (4) Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

O shepherd of Israel, hearken,

From your throne upon the cherubim, shine forth.

Rouse your power.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

Once again, O LORD of hosts,

look down from heaven, and see;

Take care of this vine,

and protect what your right hand has planted

the son of man whom you yourself made strong.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

May your help be with the man of your right hand,

with the son of man whom you yourself made strong.

Then we will no more withdraw from you;

give us new life, and we will call upon your name.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States, second typical edition, Copyright © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; Psalm refrain © 1968, 1981, 1997, International Committee on English in the Liturgy, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


December 15, 2018

Ps 80:2AC, 3B, 15-16, 18-19

R. (4) Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

O shepherd of Israel, hearken,

From your throne upon the cherubim, shine forth.

Rouse your power.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

Once again, O LORD of hosts,

look down from heaven, and see;

Take care of this vine,

and protect what your right hand has planted

the son of man whom you yourself made strong.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

May your help be with the man of your right hand,

with the son of man whom you yourself made strong.

Then we will no more withdraw from you;

give us new life, and we will call upon your name.

R. Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved.

Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States, second typical edition, Copyright © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; Psalm refrain © 1968, 1981, 1997, International Committee on English in the Liturgy, Inc. All rights reserved.

Prepare the Way of the Lord

We are at the halfway point of Advent 2018. As Christmas shopping and holiday preparations consume more of my time, how am I doing as I “prepare the way of the Lord”? And what exactly does all this “preparing” mean for me personally? Amidst the Christmas rush, is there some person or situation that needs more of my time and attention? Is there some real family need that I am neglecting?

Today’s verses from Psalm 80 invite me to “take care of this vine you have planted.” In what personal, practical ways is God inviting me to turn to him? During these Advent days just how is the Lord trying to show me his face? And in what particular “Advent ways” am I nurturing God’s gift of faith in my heart–this “vine” that God has planted?

—The Jesuit Prayer team at St. Camillus

Prayer

The Advent mystery is the beginning of the end of all within us that is not yet Christ.

—Thomas Merton

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God, You are more patient than the most patient parent. Help me to allow myself to be loved by you. Teach me for my own good. Lead me in the ways I should go. Guide my feet in the way of peace.

Amen.  

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Teaching us for our own good

Clunk, shuffle. “Take off mama’s boots and put them by the door.”

Twist, squeak. “Let me adjust the bathtub knobs.”

News from day care. “We do not bite people.”

I don’t mean to be overbearing. But I see what’s happening, and I don’t want my daughter to fall, to burn herself, or to hurt other people.

With boundaries and instructions, I try to teach her for her own good. Yet, I cannot protect her from every physical and emotional hurt in this life. Instead, I try to show her the way she should go and also hold space for her to explore, take risks and grow.

As a parent of a two-year old, I can begin to imagine what God may feel like in this passage. How many times must God have said to humanity, “O that you had paid attention…!”

What is God teaching me for my own good?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division and serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House.

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. John of the Cross

Is 48: 17-19

Thus says the Lord, your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel: I am the Lord your God, who teaches you for your own good, who leads you in the way you should go. O that you had paid attention to my commandments!

Then your prosperity would have been like a river, and your success like the waves of the sea; your offspring would have been like the sand, and your descendants like its grains; their name would never be cut off or destroyed from before me.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


December 14, 2018

St. John of the Cross

Is 48: 17-19

Thus says the Lord, your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel: I am the Lord your God, who teaches you for your own good, who leads you in the way you should go. O that you had paid attention to my commandments!

Then your prosperity would have been like a river, and your success like the waves of the sea; your offspring would have been like the sand, and your descendants like its grains; their name would never be cut off or destroyed from before me.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Teaching us for our own good

Clunk, shuffle. “Take off mama’s boots and put them by the door.”

Twist, squeak. “Let me adjust the bathtub knobs.”

News from day care. “We do not bite people.”

I don’t mean to be overbearing. But I see what’s happening, and I don’t want my daughter to fall, to burn herself, or to hurt other people.

With boundaries and instructions, I try to teach her for her own good. Yet, I cannot protect her from every physical and emotional hurt in this life. Instead, I try to show her the way she should go and also hold space for her to explore, take risks and grow.

As a parent of a two-year old, I can begin to imagine what God may feel like in this passage. How many times must God have said to humanity, “O that you had paid attention…!”

What is God teaching me for my own good?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division and serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House.

Prayer

God, You are more patient than the most patient parent. Help me to allow myself to be loved by you. Teach me for my own good. Lead me in the ways I should go. Guide my feet in the way of peace.

Amen.  

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Hearing Better Voices

We make a pause
amid many voices–
some innocent and some seductive,
some violent and some coercive,
some forgiven and genuine,
some not.
Amid this cacophony that pulls us
in many directions,
we have these old voices of your prophets;
these voices attest to
your fierce self,
your severe summons,
your generous promise,
your abiding presence.

Give us good ears,
perchance you have a word for us tonight;
Give us grace and courage to listen,
to answer,
to care,
and to rejoice,
that we may be more fully your people.

—Walter Brueggemann from Prayers for a Privileged People

 

 

  

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


God will be all in all

Before I read this prophecy to my third graders last weekend, I asked some questions:

Me: “What is Advent all about?”

Child: “Preparing for Jesus’s birthday.”

Me: “True. We’re also preparing for something else. Does anyone know?”

Child: “When Jesus comes back and God will be all in all.”  

Then we read the prophecy and looked for clues of either event. Despite the tough vocabulary, at least one child listened to the end. She said this was a Parousia prophecy. “The end says that everybody sees and knows that God made everything. All people – Catholics, Jewish people, Hindus – all together seeing and knowing God.” After catching my breath – she actually said Hindus – I realized I could probably read the passage a little closer. Take a few minutes to read it again to find something that you missed about the time when God will be all in all.

—Mark Bartholet is a John Carroll University alumnus who coordinates the Contemplative Leaders in Action program and Catechesis of the Good Shepherd at St. Peter Catholic Church, the Jesuit parish in Charlotte, NC.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!