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Prayer

Teach me to seek You,
and reveal Yourself to me as I seek;
For unless You instruct me
I cannot seek You,
and unless You reveal Yourself
I cannot find You.
Let me seek You in desiring You;
let me desire You in seeking You.
Let me find You in loving You;
let me love You in finding You.

—St. Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Missing God’s Message

The people of Jesus’ home town were astonished to find that the carpenter was doing extraordinary things. Their astonishment did not lead to faith or awe, but to offense and outrage that Jesus would dare claim to be something other than what they expected of him.

How many times have we missed a message from God because we rejected the package it came in? I think of times that someone I considered uneducated or nonspiritual revealed to me a truth about the world or God that I had struggled for years to grasp. Rather than thank God for the gift of his presence in that person, I rejected the message because of the deliverer.

God is not bound by human expectations. When have you failed to see God in unexpected places? How can you become more aware of God’s presence in everyone you meet?

—Rachel Forton is the Marketing & Retreat Coordinator for Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House in Barrington, IL.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. John Bosco

Mk 6:1-6

He left that place and came to his hometown, and his disciples followed him. On the sabbath he began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard him were astounded. They said, “Where did this man get all this? What is this wisdom that has been given to him? What deeds of power are being done by his hands! Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon, and are not his sisters here with us?” And they took offense at him.

Then Jesus said to them, “Prophets are not without honor, except in their hometown, and among their own kin, and in their own house.” And he could do no deed of power there, except that he laid his hands on a few sick people and cured them. And he was amazed at their unbelief.

Then he went about among the villages teaching.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


January 31, 2018

St. John Bosco

Mk 6:1-6

He left that place and came to his hometown, and his disciples followed him. On the sabbath he began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard him were astounded. They said, “Where did this man get all this? What is this wisdom that has been given to him? What deeds of power are being done by his hands! Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon, and are not his sisters here with us?” And they took offense at him.

Then Jesus said to them, “Prophets are not without honor, except in their hometown, and among their own kin, and in their own house.” And he could do no deed of power there, except that he laid his hands on a few sick people and cured them. And he was amazed at their unbelief.

Then he went about among the villages teaching.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Missing God’s Message

The people of Jesus’ home town were astonished to find that the carpenter was doing extraordinary things. Their astonishment did not lead to faith or awe, but to offense and outrage that Jesus would dare claim to be something other than what they expected of him.

How many times have we missed a message from God because we rejected the package it came in? I think of times that someone I considered uneducated or nonspiritual revealed to me a truth about the world or God that I had struggled for years to grasp. Rather than thank God for the gift of his presence in that person, I rejected the message because of the deliverer.

God is not bound by human expectations. When have you failed to see God in unexpected places? How can you become more aware of God’s presence in everyone you meet?

—Rachel Forton is the Marketing & Retreat Coordinator for Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House in Barrington, IL.

Prayer

Teach me to seek You,
and reveal Yourself to me as I seek;
For unless You instruct me
I cannot seek You,
and unless You reveal Yourself
I cannot find You.
Let me seek You in desiring You;
let me desire You in seeking You.
Let me find You in loving You;
let me love You in finding You.

—St. Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord,

Please lead us towards hope.
When we wander towards thorns and dark valleys,
Gently tip us back towards the sunlight.
When our journey requires passing through shadows,
Remind us of their temporary nature.
When we question the trail,
And try to find our own way,
Remind us you see all,
You know all,
And you love us.

Amen.

Br. Mark Mackey, SJ

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Persistent hope

Jesus tells the woman with the hemorrhage in today’s Gospel very clearly that it is her faith that has saved her. No doubt! But personally, this can launch me into a train of thought that is not helpful: Is my faith in Jesus’ healing power not strong enough? Is that why my back pain persists? Is taking medication a sign of weak faith? Do I simply need to be more radical in my faith for my life’s problems to go away?

I’ve found it more helpful to focus on the woman’s powerful example of hope. After 12 years of seeing doctors and spending all of her money on this issue, she somehow still believed she could be cured, God willing. She took the actions needed to get better, and yet didn’t become cynical or hopeless when the cure didn’t come.

In what areas of my life have I lost hope?  

—Br. Mark Mackey, SJ, is a Jesuit Brother of the Midwest Province in First Studies at Loyola University Chicago.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mk 5:21-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered around him; and he was by the sea. Then one of the leaders of the synagogue named Jairus came and, when he saw him, fell at his feet and begged him repeatedly, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well, and live.”

So he went with him. And a large crowd followed him and pressed in on him. Now there was a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years. She had endured much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had; and she was no better, but rather grew worse. She had heard about Jesus, and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, for she said, “If I but touch his clothes, I will be made well.”

Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. Immediately aware that power had gone forth from him, Jesus turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my clothes?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing in on you; how can you say, ‘Who touched me?’” He looked all around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, some people came from the leader’s house to say, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the leader of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.”

He allowed no one to follow him except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James. When they came to the house of the leader of the synagogue, he saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. When he had entered, he said to them, “Why do you make a commotion and weep? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. Then he put them all outside, and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was. He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means, “Little girl, get up!” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was twelve years of age).

At this they were overcome with amazement. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


January 30, 2018

Mk 5:21-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered around him; and he was by the sea. Then one of the leaders of the synagogue named Jairus came and, when he saw him, fell at his feet and begged him repeatedly, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well, and live.”

So he went with him. And a large crowd followed him and pressed in on him. Now there was a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years. She had endured much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had; and she was no better, but rather grew worse. She had heard about Jesus, and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, for she said, “If I but touch his clothes, I will be made well.”

Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. Immediately aware that power had gone forth from him, Jesus turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my clothes?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing in on you; how can you say, ‘Who touched me?’” He looked all around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, some people came from the leader’s house to say, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the leader of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.”

He allowed no one to follow him except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James. When they came to the house of the leader of the synagogue, he saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. When he had entered, he said to them, “Why do you make a commotion and weep? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. Then he put them all outside, and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was. He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means, “Little girl, get up!” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was twelve years of age).

At this they were overcome with amazement. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Persistent hope

Jesus tells the woman with the hemorrhage in today’s Gospel very clearly that it is her faith that has saved her. No doubt! But personally, this can launch me into a train of thought that is not helpful: Is my faith in Jesus’ healing power not strong enough? Is that why my back pain persists? Is taking medication a sign of weak faith? Do I simply need to be more radical in my faith for my life’s problems to go away?

I’ve found it more helpful to focus on the woman’s powerful example of hope. After 12 years of seeing doctors and spending all of her money on this issue, she somehow still believed she could be cured, God willing. She took the actions needed to get better, and yet didn’t become cynical or hopeless when the cure didn’t come.

In what areas of my life have I lost hope?  

—Br. Mark Mackey, SJ, is a Jesuit Brother of the Midwest Province in First Studies at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Lord,

Please lead us towards hope.
When we wander towards thorns and dark valleys,
Gently tip us back towards the sunlight.
When our journey requires passing through shadows,
Remind us of their temporary nature.
When we question the trail,
And try to find our own way,
Remind us you see all,
You know all,
And you love us.

Amen.

Br. Mark Mackey, SJ

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord, grant us the strength we need in those times when we need it, the freedom to forgive when forgiveness is needed, and the awareness of your presence in our lives at all time.  Amen

—The Jesuit Prayer team 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


God in the struggles

In today’s first reading, one of David’s enemies is screaming at the mighty warrior king.  The aggrieved man–Shimei–seems almost inconsequential as David’s assistant requests to immediately kill him.  Given the standards of the ancient world, David should have surely ordered Shimei tortured and killed.  Instead David shows mercy, and even seeks God’s presence in the struggle.  Not only does David resist the temptation toward “just” retribution, but he also realizes that it is during times of trial that we can really become aware of God’s presence in our lives.

It is easy to wish away such difficult times of struggle in our lives, if we pause to become aware of God’s presence, we find solace, and even strength.  Like David, we are invited to forgive, to let go of our need to protect our egos, and then to become aware of how God is working in our lives, most often through other people.

—Matt Kemper is the Director of Community Service at St. Xavier High School in Cincinnati.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

Teach me to seek You,
and reveal Yourself to me as I seek;
For unless You instruct me
I cannot seek You,
and unless You reveal Yourself
I cannot find You.
Let me seek You in desiring You;
let me desire You in seeking You.
Let me find You in loving You;
let me love You in finding You.

—St. Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Missing God’s Message

The people of Jesus’ home town were astonished to find that the carpenter was doing extraordinary things. Their astonishment did not lead to faith or awe, but to offense and outrage that Jesus would dare claim to be something other than what they expected of him.

How many times have we missed a message from God because we rejected the package it came in? I think of times that someone I considered uneducated or nonspiritual revealed to me a truth about the world or God that I had struggled for years to grasp. Rather than thank God for the gift of his presence in that person, I rejected the message because of the deliverer.

God is not bound by human expectations. When have you failed to see God in unexpected places? How can you become more aware of God’s presence in everyone you meet?

—Rachel Forton is the Marketing & Retreat Coordinator for Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House in Barrington, IL.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. John Bosco

Mk 6:1-6

He left that place and came to his hometown, and his disciples followed him. On the sabbath he began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard him were astounded. They said, “Where did this man get all this? What is this wisdom that has been given to him? What deeds of power are being done by his hands! Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon, and are not his sisters here with us?” And they took offense at him.

Then Jesus said to them, “Prophets are not without honor, except in their hometown, and among their own kin, and in their own house.” And he could do no deed of power there, except that he laid his hands on a few sick people and cured them. And he was amazed at their unbelief.

Then he went about among the villages teaching.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


January 31, 2018

St. John Bosco

Mk 6:1-6

He left that place and came to his hometown, and his disciples followed him. On the sabbath he began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard him were astounded. They said, “Where did this man get all this? What is this wisdom that has been given to him? What deeds of power are being done by his hands! Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon, and are not his sisters here with us?” And they took offense at him.

Then Jesus said to them, “Prophets are not without honor, except in their hometown, and among their own kin, and in their own house.” And he could do no deed of power there, except that he laid his hands on a few sick people and cured them. And he was amazed at their unbelief.

Then he went about among the villages teaching.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Missing God’s Message

The people of Jesus’ home town were astonished to find that the carpenter was doing extraordinary things. Their astonishment did not lead to faith or awe, but to offense and outrage that Jesus would dare claim to be something other than what they expected of him.

How many times have we missed a message from God because we rejected the package it came in? I think of times that someone I considered uneducated or nonspiritual revealed to me a truth about the world or God that I had struggled for years to grasp. Rather than thank God for the gift of his presence in that person, I rejected the message because of the deliverer.

God is not bound by human expectations. When have you failed to see God in unexpected places? How can you become more aware of God’s presence in everyone you meet?

—Rachel Forton is the Marketing & Retreat Coordinator for Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House in Barrington, IL.

Prayer

Teach me to seek You,
and reveal Yourself to me as I seek;
For unless You instruct me
I cannot seek You,
and unless You reveal Yourself
I cannot find You.
Let me seek You in desiring You;
let me desire You in seeking You.
Let me find You in loving You;
let me love You in finding You.

—St. Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord,

Please lead us towards hope.
When we wander towards thorns and dark valleys,
Gently tip us back towards the sunlight.
When our journey requires passing through shadows,
Remind us of their temporary nature.
When we question the trail,
And try to find our own way,
Remind us you see all,
You know all,
And you love us.

Amen.

Br. Mark Mackey, SJ

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Persistent hope

Jesus tells the woman with the hemorrhage in today’s Gospel very clearly that it is her faith that has saved her. No doubt! But personally, this can launch me into a train of thought that is not helpful: Is my faith in Jesus’ healing power not strong enough? Is that why my back pain persists? Is taking medication a sign of weak faith? Do I simply need to be more radical in my faith for my life’s problems to go away?

I’ve found it more helpful to focus on the woman’s powerful example of hope. After 12 years of seeing doctors and spending all of her money on this issue, she somehow still believed she could be cured, God willing. She took the actions needed to get better, and yet didn’t become cynical or hopeless when the cure didn’t come.

In what areas of my life have I lost hope?  

—Br. Mark Mackey, SJ, is a Jesuit Brother of the Midwest Province in First Studies at Loyola University Chicago.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mk 5:21-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered around him; and he was by the sea. Then one of the leaders of the synagogue named Jairus came and, when he saw him, fell at his feet and begged him repeatedly, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well, and live.”

So he went with him. And a large crowd followed him and pressed in on him. Now there was a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years. She had endured much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had; and she was no better, but rather grew worse. She had heard about Jesus, and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, for she said, “If I but touch his clothes, I will be made well.”

Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. Immediately aware that power had gone forth from him, Jesus turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my clothes?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing in on you; how can you say, ‘Who touched me?’” He looked all around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, some people came from the leader’s house to say, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the leader of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.”

He allowed no one to follow him except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James. When they came to the house of the leader of the synagogue, he saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. When he had entered, he said to them, “Why do you make a commotion and weep? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. Then he put them all outside, and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was. He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means, “Little girl, get up!” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was twelve years of age).

At this they were overcome with amazement. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


January 30, 2018

Mk 5:21-43

When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered around him; and he was by the sea. Then one of the leaders of the synagogue named Jairus came and, when he saw him, fell at his feet and begged him repeatedly, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well, and live.”

So he went with him. And a large crowd followed him and pressed in on him. Now there was a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years. She had endured much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had; and she was no better, but rather grew worse. She had heard about Jesus, and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, for she said, “If I but touch his clothes, I will be made well.”

Immediately her hemorrhage stopped; and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. Immediately aware that power had gone forth from him, Jesus turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my clothes?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing in on you; how can you say, ‘Who touched me?’” He looked all around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before him, and told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, some people came from the leader’s house to say, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the leader of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.”

He allowed no one to follow him except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James. When they came to the house of the leader of the synagogue, he saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. When he had entered, he said to them, “Why do you make a commotion and weep? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. Then he put them all outside, and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was. He took her by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means, “Little girl, get up!” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was twelve years of age).

At this they were overcome with amazement. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Persistent hope

Jesus tells the woman with the hemorrhage in today’s Gospel very clearly that it is her faith that has saved her. No doubt! But personally, this can launch me into a train of thought that is not helpful: Is my faith in Jesus’ healing power not strong enough? Is that why my back pain persists? Is taking medication a sign of weak faith? Do I simply need to be more radical in my faith for my life’s problems to go away?

I’ve found it more helpful to focus on the woman’s powerful example of hope. After 12 years of seeing doctors and spending all of her money on this issue, she somehow still believed she could be cured, God willing. She took the actions needed to get better, and yet didn’t become cynical or hopeless when the cure didn’t come.

In what areas of my life have I lost hope?  

—Br. Mark Mackey, SJ, is a Jesuit Brother of the Midwest Province in First Studies at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Lord,

Please lead us towards hope.
When we wander towards thorns and dark valleys,
Gently tip us back towards the sunlight.
When our journey requires passing through shadows,
Remind us of their temporary nature.
When we question the trail,
And try to find our own way,
Remind us you see all,
You know all,
And you love us.

Amen.

Br. Mark Mackey, SJ

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord, grant us the strength we need in those times when we need it, the freedom to forgive when forgiveness is needed, and the awareness of your presence in our lives at all time.  Amen

—The Jesuit Prayer team 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


God in the struggles

In today’s first reading, one of David’s enemies is screaming at the mighty warrior king.  The aggrieved man–Shimei–seems almost inconsequential as David’s assistant requests to immediately kill him.  Given the standards of the ancient world, David should have surely ordered Shimei tortured and killed.  Instead David shows mercy, and even seeks God’s presence in the struggle.  Not only does David resist the temptation toward “just” retribution, but he also realizes that it is during times of trial that we can really become aware of God’s presence in our lives.

It is easy to wish away such difficult times of struggle in our lives, if we pause to become aware of God’s presence, we find solace, and even strength.  Like David, we are invited to forgive, to let go of our need to protect our egos, and then to become aware of how God is working in our lives, most often through other people.

—Matt Kemper is the Director of Community Service at St. Xavier High School in Cincinnati.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!