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Prayer

O Jesus, I come before you at the
beginning of this day.
I gaze at your face, I look upon
your side pierced by the lance.
Your wounded heart speaks to me of
God’s love poured out for us.

Take, Lord, and receive my heart:
the words of faith that I speak,
the works of justice I would do,
my joys and sufferings.

When I come to the Eucharistic table,
gather my offerings to your own
for the life of the world.

At the end of the day, place me
with Mary, your mother,
and for her sake take me to
your Heart.
Amen.

—Fr. James Devereux, S.J.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Understanding Jesus’ message

Today’s gospel reading expresses the continual challenge of Christ’s call to discipleship.  From the beginning of his ministry, Jesus has preached a kingdom that entails a complete reversal of social values and expectations.  Jesus’ call to serve rather than to be served goes against everything our society teaches us about success and happiness; perhaps it is a contradiction of human nature itself.  

We all want what is best for ourselves and the ones that we love, as the mother of James and John desires a privileged position for her sons.  The strange thing about her request, though, is that she makes it immediately after Jesus quite clearly predicts his own suffering and death.  The mother hasn’t been able to truly hear Jesus in what he has been suggesting will bring fullness of life for her and her two sons.  So, she doesn’t even “know what she is asking.”  Jesus, however, knows that James and John will eventually share Jesus’ cup and serve the kingdom of God in his way.  

Lent is a good time to pause to ask ourselves if we are truly hearing Jesus’ call to serve the kingdom of God, or if we have distorted that message and turned it into what we wish to hear, or what our society wants us to hear.    

—Tom Weiler is a teacher in the department of Religious Studies and the moderator of Club Vinyl at Saint Ignatius College Prep in Chicago.  

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mt 20:17-28

While Jesus was going up to Jerusalem, he took the twelve disciples aside by themselves, and said to them on the way, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles to be mocked and flogged and crucified; and on the third day he will be raised.”

Then the mother of the sons of Zebedee came to him with her sons, and kneeling before him, she asked a favor of him. And he said to her, “What do you want?” She said to him, “Declare that these two sons of mine will sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your kingdom.” But Jesus answered, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I am about to drink?” They said to him, “We are able.”He said to them, “You will indeed drink my cup, but to sit at my right hand and at my left, this is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father.”

When the ten heard it, they were angry with the two brothers. But Jesus called them to him and said, “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. It will not be so among you; but whoever wishes to be great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be your slave; just as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


February 28, 2018

Mt 20:17-28

While Jesus was going up to Jerusalem, he took the twelve disciples aside by themselves, and said to them on the way, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles to be mocked and flogged and crucified; and on the third day he will be raised.”

Then the mother of the sons of Zebedee came to him with her sons, and kneeling before him, she asked a favor of him. And he said to her, “What do you want?” She said to him, “Declare that these two sons of mine will sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your kingdom.” But Jesus answered, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I am about to drink?” They said to him, “We are able.”He said to them, “You will indeed drink my cup, but to sit at my right hand and at my left, this is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father.”

When the ten heard it, they were angry with the two brothers. But Jesus called them to him and said, “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. It will not be so among you; but whoever wishes to be great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be your slave; just as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Understanding Jesus’ message

Today’s gospel reading expresses the continual challenge of Christ’s call to discipleship.  From the beginning of his ministry, Jesus has preached a kingdom that entails a complete reversal of social values and expectations.  Jesus’ call to serve rather than to be served goes against everything our society teaches us about success and happiness; perhaps it is a contradiction of human nature itself.  

We all want what is best for ourselves and the ones that we love, as the mother of James and John desires a privileged position for her sons.  The strange thing about her request, though, is that she makes it immediately after Jesus quite clearly predicts his own suffering and death.  The mother hasn’t been able to truly hear Jesus in what he has been suggesting will bring fullness of life for her and her two sons.  So, she doesn’t even “know what she is asking.”  Jesus, however, knows that James and John will eventually share Jesus’ cup and serve the kingdom of God in his way.  

Lent is a good time to pause to ask ourselves if we are truly hearing Jesus’ call to serve the kingdom of God, or if we have distorted that message and turned it into what we wish to hear, or what our society wants us to hear.    

—Tom Weiler is a teacher in the department of Religious Studies and the moderator of Club Vinyl at Saint Ignatius College Prep in Chicago.  

Prayer

O Jesus, I come before you at the
beginning of this day.
I gaze at your face, I look upon
your side pierced by the lance.
Your wounded heart speaks to me of
God’s love poured out for us.

Take, Lord, and receive my heart:
the words of faith that I speak,
the works of justice I would do,
my joys and sufferings.

When I come to the Eucharistic table,
gather my offerings to your own
for the life of the world.

At the end of the day, place me
with Mary, your mother,
and for her sake take me to
your Heart.
Amen.

—Fr. James Devereux, S.J.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Let me have too deep a sense of humor to be proud.
Let me know my absurdity before I act absurdly.
Let me realize that when I am humble I am most human,
most truthful,
and most worthy of your serious consideration.

—Daniel J. Lord, SJ

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Struggling to be more like Jesus

Jesus, at first when I read your words today I thought to myself: ‘This is something I still need a lot of work on…’ I’m a perfect Pharisee. Often, when I have more knowledge on a topic than someone else, I catch myself being condescending. When I’m busy, I can make all sorts of excuses why I don’t need to help with this chore but why others should. And the worst is when I’m busy and someone interrupts me. Don’t they know that I’m really important?! Frankly, sometimes I act like I’m king of the universe.

Jesus, you know I struggle with this, but I’m trying! I need your help. I want nothing more than to be like you. Help me to see your image in others and to give myself in service to love.

Can I offer control of my day today to God?

—Nathan Krawetzke, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Midwest Province studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mt 23:1-12

Then Jesus said to the crowds and to his disciples, “The scribes and the Pharisees sit on Moses’ seat; therefore, do whatever they teach you and follow it; but do not do as they do, for they do not practice what they teach. They tie up heavy burdens, hard to bear, and lay them on the shoulders of others; but they themselves are unwilling to lift a finger to move them. They do all their deeds to be seen by others; for they make their phylacteries broad and their fringes long.

They love to have the place of honor at banquets and the best seats in the synagogues, and to be greeted with respect in the marketplaces, and to have people call them rabbi. But you are not to be called rabbi, for you have one teacher, and you are all students. And call no one your father on earth, for you have one Father—the one in heaven. Nor are you to be called instructors, for you have one instructor, the Messiah.

The greatest among you will be your servant. All who exalt themselves will be humbled, and all who humble themselves will be exalted.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


February 27, 2018

Mt 23:1-12

Then Jesus said to the crowds and to his disciples, “The scribes and the Pharisees sit on Moses’ seat; therefore, do whatever they teach you and follow it; but do not do as they do, for they do not practice what they teach. They tie up heavy burdens, hard to bear, and lay them on the shoulders of others; but they themselves are unwilling to lift a finger to move them. They do all their deeds to be seen by others; for they make their phylacteries broad and their fringes long.

They love to have the place of honor at banquets and the best seats in the synagogues, and to be greeted with respect in the marketplaces, and to have people call them rabbi. But you are not to be called rabbi, for you have one teacher, and you are all students. And call no one your father on earth, for you have one Father—the one in heaven. Nor are you to be called instructors, for you have one instructor, the Messiah.

The greatest among you will be your servant. All who exalt themselves will be humbled, and all who humble themselves will be exalted.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Struggling to be more like Jesus

Jesus, at first when I read your words today I thought to myself: ‘This is something I still need a lot of work on…’ I’m a perfect Pharisee. Often, when I have more knowledge on a topic than someone else, I catch myself being condescending. When I’m busy, I can make all sorts of excuses why I don’t need to help with this chore but why others should. And the worst is when I’m busy and someone interrupts me. Don’t they know that I’m really important?! Frankly, sometimes I act like I’m king of the universe.

Jesus, you know I struggle with this, but I’m trying! I need your help. I want nothing more than to be like you. Help me to see your image in others and to give myself in service to love.

Can I offer control of my day today to God?

—Nathan Krawetzke, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Midwest Province studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Let me have too deep a sense of humor to be proud.
Let me know my absurdity before I act absurdly.
Let me realize that when I am humble I am most human,
most truthful,
and most worthy of your serious consideration.

—Daniel J. Lord, SJ

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Thank you, Lord, for making clear your desire for us to love one another. I pray for the awareness to recognize when my human inclination to be right or in control distances me from you, and for the grace to choose to love.

—Cindy Ristroph

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Let God be God

In a world that measures strength by force, numbers, and material goods, Jesus’ instruction to “Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful” strikes an opposing chord to reveal what God considers most important, namely, our capability to choose love in the face of everything else.

We’re human; our brains function by detecting contrast and making distinctions. Our complex, fast-paced world demands judgments about actions, issues, and options. Yet Jesus’ words challenge us to remember: the business of judging hearts and motivations belongs to God. Our call is to emulate God’s higher standard of mercy and forgiveness, with the promise that our behavior – loving or otherwise – will be reflected back to us. Choosing to love is clearly the better course, and its rewards beyond measure.

How easily do I cross the subtle line between judging others’ actions and their hearts? Am I willing to let God be God?

—Cindy Ristroph is a parish minister at St. Aloysius Parish in Baton Rouge, LA, and occasionally writes for the dotMagis blog.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

O Jesus, I come before you at the
beginning of this day.
I gaze at your face, I look upon
your side pierced by the lance.
Your wounded heart speaks to me of
God’s love poured out for us.

Take, Lord, and receive my heart:
the words of faith that I speak,
the works of justice I would do,
my joys and sufferings.

When I come to the Eucharistic table,
gather my offerings to your own
for the life of the world.

At the end of the day, place me
with Mary, your mother,
and for her sake take me to
your Heart.
Amen.

—Fr. James Devereux, S.J.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Understanding Jesus’ message

Today’s gospel reading expresses the continual challenge of Christ’s call to discipleship.  From the beginning of his ministry, Jesus has preached a kingdom that entails a complete reversal of social values and expectations.  Jesus’ call to serve rather than to be served goes against everything our society teaches us about success and happiness; perhaps it is a contradiction of human nature itself.  

We all want what is best for ourselves and the ones that we love, as the mother of James and John desires a privileged position for her sons.  The strange thing about her request, though, is that she makes it immediately after Jesus quite clearly predicts his own suffering and death.  The mother hasn’t been able to truly hear Jesus in what he has been suggesting will bring fullness of life for her and her two sons.  So, she doesn’t even “know what she is asking.”  Jesus, however, knows that James and John will eventually share Jesus’ cup and serve the kingdom of God in his way.  

Lent is a good time to pause to ask ourselves if we are truly hearing Jesus’ call to serve the kingdom of God, or if we have distorted that message and turned it into what we wish to hear, or what our society wants us to hear.    

—Tom Weiler is a teacher in the department of Religious Studies and the moderator of Club Vinyl at Saint Ignatius College Prep in Chicago.  

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mt 20:17-28

While Jesus was going up to Jerusalem, he took the twelve disciples aside by themselves, and said to them on the way, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles to be mocked and flogged and crucified; and on the third day he will be raised.”

Then the mother of the sons of Zebedee came to him with her sons, and kneeling before him, she asked a favor of him. And he said to her, “What do you want?” She said to him, “Declare that these two sons of mine will sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your kingdom.” But Jesus answered, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I am about to drink?” They said to him, “We are able.”He said to them, “You will indeed drink my cup, but to sit at my right hand and at my left, this is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father.”

When the ten heard it, they were angry with the two brothers. But Jesus called them to him and said, “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. It will not be so among you; but whoever wishes to be great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be your slave; just as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


February 28, 2018

Mt 20:17-28

While Jesus was going up to Jerusalem, he took the twelve disciples aside by themselves, and said to them on the way, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles to be mocked and flogged and crucified; and on the third day he will be raised.”

Then the mother of the sons of Zebedee came to him with her sons, and kneeling before him, she asked a favor of him. And he said to her, “What do you want?” She said to him, “Declare that these two sons of mine will sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your kingdom.” But Jesus answered, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I am about to drink?” They said to him, “We are able.”He said to them, “You will indeed drink my cup, but to sit at my right hand and at my left, this is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father.”

When the ten heard it, they were angry with the two brothers. But Jesus called them to him and said, “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. It will not be so among you; but whoever wishes to be great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be your slave; just as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Understanding Jesus’ message

Today’s gospel reading expresses the continual challenge of Christ’s call to discipleship.  From the beginning of his ministry, Jesus has preached a kingdom that entails a complete reversal of social values and expectations.  Jesus’ call to serve rather than to be served goes against everything our society teaches us about success and happiness; perhaps it is a contradiction of human nature itself.  

We all want what is best for ourselves and the ones that we love, as the mother of James and John desires a privileged position for her sons.  The strange thing about her request, though, is that she makes it immediately after Jesus quite clearly predicts his own suffering and death.  The mother hasn’t been able to truly hear Jesus in what he has been suggesting will bring fullness of life for her and her two sons.  So, she doesn’t even “know what she is asking.”  Jesus, however, knows that James and John will eventually share Jesus’ cup and serve the kingdom of God in his way.  

Lent is a good time to pause to ask ourselves if we are truly hearing Jesus’ call to serve the kingdom of God, or if we have distorted that message and turned it into what we wish to hear, or what our society wants us to hear.    

—Tom Weiler is a teacher in the department of Religious Studies and the moderator of Club Vinyl at Saint Ignatius College Prep in Chicago.  

Prayer

O Jesus, I come before you at the
beginning of this day.
I gaze at your face, I look upon
your side pierced by the lance.
Your wounded heart speaks to me of
God’s love poured out for us.

Take, Lord, and receive my heart:
the words of faith that I speak,
the works of justice I would do,
my joys and sufferings.

When I come to the Eucharistic table,
gather my offerings to your own
for the life of the world.

At the end of the day, place me
with Mary, your mother,
and for her sake take me to
your Heart.
Amen.

—Fr. James Devereux, S.J.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Let me have too deep a sense of humor to be proud.
Let me know my absurdity before I act absurdly.
Let me realize that when I am humble I am most human,
most truthful,
and most worthy of your serious consideration.

—Daniel J. Lord, SJ

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Struggling to be more like Jesus

Jesus, at first when I read your words today I thought to myself: ‘This is something I still need a lot of work on…’ I’m a perfect Pharisee. Often, when I have more knowledge on a topic than someone else, I catch myself being condescending. When I’m busy, I can make all sorts of excuses why I don’t need to help with this chore but why others should. And the worst is when I’m busy and someone interrupts me. Don’t they know that I’m really important?! Frankly, sometimes I act like I’m king of the universe.

Jesus, you know I struggle with this, but I’m trying! I need your help. I want nothing more than to be like you. Help me to see your image in others and to give myself in service to love.

Can I offer control of my day today to God?

—Nathan Krawetzke, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Midwest Province studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mt 23:1-12

Then Jesus said to the crowds and to his disciples, “The scribes and the Pharisees sit on Moses’ seat; therefore, do whatever they teach you and follow it; but do not do as they do, for they do not practice what they teach. They tie up heavy burdens, hard to bear, and lay them on the shoulders of others; but they themselves are unwilling to lift a finger to move them. They do all their deeds to be seen by others; for they make their phylacteries broad and their fringes long.

They love to have the place of honor at banquets and the best seats in the synagogues, and to be greeted with respect in the marketplaces, and to have people call them rabbi. But you are not to be called rabbi, for you have one teacher, and you are all students. And call no one your father on earth, for you have one Father—the one in heaven. Nor are you to be called instructors, for you have one instructor, the Messiah.

The greatest among you will be your servant. All who exalt themselves will be humbled, and all who humble themselves will be exalted.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


February 27, 2018

Mt 23:1-12

Then Jesus said to the crowds and to his disciples, “The scribes and the Pharisees sit on Moses’ seat; therefore, do whatever they teach you and follow it; but do not do as they do, for they do not practice what they teach. They tie up heavy burdens, hard to bear, and lay them on the shoulders of others; but they themselves are unwilling to lift a finger to move them. They do all their deeds to be seen by others; for they make their phylacteries broad and their fringes long.

They love to have the place of honor at banquets and the best seats in the synagogues, and to be greeted with respect in the marketplaces, and to have people call them rabbi. But you are not to be called rabbi, for you have one teacher, and you are all students. And call no one your father on earth, for you have one Father—the one in heaven. Nor are you to be called instructors, for you have one instructor, the Messiah.

The greatest among you will be your servant. All who exalt themselves will be humbled, and all who humble themselves will be exalted.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Struggling to be more like Jesus

Jesus, at first when I read your words today I thought to myself: ‘This is something I still need a lot of work on…’ I’m a perfect Pharisee. Often, when I have more knowledge on a topic than someone else, I catch myself being condescending. When I’m busy, I can make all sorts of excuses why I don’t need to help with this chore but why others should. And the worst is when I’m busy and someone interrupts me. Don’t they know that I’m really important?! Frankly, sometimes I act like I’m king of the universe.

Jesus, you know I struggle with this, but I’m trying! I need your help. I want nothing more than to be like you. Help me to see your image in others and to give myself in service to love.

Can I offer control of my day today to God?

—Nathan Krawetzke, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Midwest Province studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Let me have too deep a sense of humor to be proud.
Let me know my absurdity before I act absurdly.
Let me realize that when I am humble I am most human,
most truthful,
and most worthy of your serious consideration.

—Daniel J. Lord, SJ

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Thank you, Lord, for making clear your desire for us to love one another. I pray for the awareness to recognize when my human inclination to be right or in control distances me from you, and for the grace to choose to love.

—Cindy Ristroph

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Let God be God

In a world that measures strength by force, numbers, and material goods, Jesus’ instruction to “Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful” strikes an opposing chord to reveal what God considers most important, namely, our capability to choose love in the face of everything else.

We’re human; our brains function by detecting contrast and making distinctions. Our complex, fast-paced world demands judgments about actions, issues, and options. Yet Jesus’ words challenge us to remember: the business of judging hearts and motivations belongs to God. Our call is to emulate God’s higher standard of mercy and forgiveness, with the promise that our behavior – loving or otherwise – will be reflected back to us. Choosing to love is clearly the better course, and its rewards beyond measure.

How easily do I cross the subtle line between judging others’ actions and their hearts? Am I willing to let God be God?

—Cindy Ristroph is a parish minister at St. Aloysius Parish in Baton Rouge, LA, and occasionally writes for the dotMagis blog.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!