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Prayer

Holy is Your Name

My soul is filled with joy
as I sing to God my savior:
you have looked upon your servant,
you have visited your people.

Refrain
And holy is your name through all generations!
Everlasting is your mercy to the people you have chosen,
and holy is your name.

I am lowly as a child,
but I know from this day forward
that my name will be remembered,
for all will call me blessed.

I proclaim the pow’r of God,
you do marvels for your servants;
though you scatter the proud hearted
and destroy the might of princes.

To the hungry you give food,
send the rich away empty.
In your mercy you are mindful
of the people you have chosen.

In your love you now fulfill
what you promised to your people.
I will praise you, Lord, my savior,
everlasting is your mercy.

—Lyrics of  Holy is Your Name, David Haas, © 1989 GIA Publications

 

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The brightness lingered

He came when I was working in the garden. It was a bright day; I squinted to see him in the brightness.

He said: When your husband Zacharias returns from his priestly duty, you will conceive and bear a son. (I dared not breathe.)

He said: You must name him John. He will be called by God to announce the coming of the Messiah. (I drew a deep breath.)

He said: Zacharias will be mute for a time, because he doubted. (I smiled at this, knowing how stubborn Zacharias can be.)

He said: The Messiah will be born of your young cousin Mary. She will come to you in the spring. She will need your advice and comfort as she deals with her unexpected pregnancy.

I said: I will welcome her with joy.

He smiled and was gone. The brightness lingered.

—Barbara Lee is a spiritual director, an Ignatian Volunteer, and the author of God Isn’t Finished With Me Yet: Discovering the Spiritual Graces of Later Life published by Loyola Press

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Feast of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Luke 1:39-56

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.” And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name.

His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation. He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.”

And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


May 31, 2018

Feast of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Luke 1:39-56

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.” And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name.

His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation. He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.”

And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

The brightness lingered

He came when I was working in the garden. It was a bright day; I squinted to see him in the brightness.

He said: When your husband Zacharias returns from his priestly duty, you will conceive and bear a son. (I dared not breathe.)

He said: You must name him John. He will be called by God to announce the coming of the Messiah. (I drew a deep breath.)

He said: Zacharias will be mute for a time, because he doubted. (I smiled at this, knowing how stubborn Zacharias can be.)

He said: The Messiah will be born of your young cousin Mary. She will come to you in the spring. She will need your advice and comfort as she deals with her unexpected pregnancy.

I said: I will welcome her with joy.

He smiled and was gone. The brightness lingered.

—Barbara Lee is a spiritual director, an Ignatian Volunteer, and the author of God Isn’t Finished With Me Yet: Discovering the Spiritual Graces of Later Life published by Loyola Press

Prayer

Holy is Your Name

My soul is filled with joy
as I sing to God my savior:
you have looked upon your servant,
you have visited your people.

Refrain
And holy is your name through all generations!
Everlasting is your mercy to the people you have chosen,
and holy is your name.

I am lowly as a child,
but I know from this day forward
that my name will be remembered,
for all will call me blessed.

I proclaim the pow’r of God,
you do marvels for your servants;
though you scatter the proud hearted
and destroy the might of princes.

To the hungry you give food,
send the rich away empty.
In your mercy you are mindful
of the people you have chosen.

In your love you now fulfill
what you promised to your people.
I will praise you, Lord, my savior,
everlasting is your mercy.

—Lyrics of  Holy is Your Name, David Haas, © 1989 GIA Publications

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God, who calls us to a life-changing mission:
Enflame our hearts with the desire to change the world with you,
to share our gifts and take part in your mission.
May we always respond to your invitation to love.
May our hearts be on fire with your love.

—Andy Otto

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Invitation to commitment

Here we have a solemn moment where Jesus shares his forthcoming fate with the Twelve and James and John have the audacity to say, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” In its reading it seems they have ignored what their master just said. But Jesus responds with the freedom and availability he has shown to every person he encounters. What they want is to share in his glory. Jesus responds to them with an invitation to true commitment that might as well have come out of St. Ignatius’ Call of the King meditation: “Whoever would like to come with me is to labor with me, that following me in the pain, he may also follow me in the glory.”

All Christ-followers can indeed share in Christ’s glory, but it doesn’t come for free. It comes with a commitment to the challenges (and joys) of service and laying down one’s life for others.

How would you respond to Jesus’ invitation?

—Andy Otto is a pastoral associate at St. Thomas More Jesuit Church and a retreat director at Ignatius House Jesuit Retreat Center in Atlanta, GA. He is the author of God Moments.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mark 10:32-45

They were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them; they were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. He took the twelve aside again and began to tell them what was to happen to him, saying, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and the scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles;they will mock him, and spit upon him, and flog him, and kill him; and after three days he will rise again.”

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to him and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” They replied, “We are able.”

Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them.

But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Invitation to commitment

Here we have a solemn moment where Jesus shares his forthcoming fate with the Twelve and James and John have the audacity to say, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” In its reading it seems they have ignored what their master just said. But Jesus responds with the freedom and availability he has shown to every person he encounters. What they want is to share in his glory. Jesus responds to them with an invitation to true commitment that might as well have come out of St. Ignatius’ Call of the King meditation: “Whoever would like to come with me is to labor with me, that following me in the pain, he may also follow me in the glory.”

All Christ-followers can indeed share in Christ’s glory, but it doesn’t come for free. It comes with a commitment to the challenges (and joys) of service and laying down one’s life for others.

How would you respond to Jesus’ invitation?

—Andy Otto is a pastoral associate at St. Thomas More Jesuit Church and a retreat director at Ignatius House Jesuit Retreat Center in Atlanta, GA. He is the author of God Moments.

Prayer

God, who calls us to a life-changing mission:
Enflame our hearts with the desire to change the world with you,
to share our gifts and take part in your mission.
May we always respond to your invitation to love.
May our hearts be on fire with your love.

—Andy Otto

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


May 30, 2018

Mark 10:32-45

They were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them; they were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. He took the twelve aside again and began to tell them what was to happen to him, saying, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and the scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles;they will mock him, and spit upon him, and flog him, and kill him; and after three days he will rise again.”

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to him and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” They replied, “We are able.”

Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them.

But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Invitation to commitment

Here we have a solemn moment where Jesus shares his forthcoming fate with the Twelve and James and John have the audacity to say, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” In its reading it seems they have ignored what their master just said. But Jesus responds with the freedom and availability he has shown to every person he encounters. What they want is to share in his glory. Jesus responds to them with an invitation to true commitment that might as well have come out of St. Ignatius’ Call of the King meditation: “Whoever would like to come with me is to labor with me, that following me in the pain, he may also follow me in the glory.”

All Christ-followers can indeed share in Christ’s glory, but it doesn’t come for free. It comes with a commitment to the challenges (and joys) of service and laying down one’s life for others.

How would you respond to Jesus’ invitation?

—Andy Otto is a pastoral associate at St. Thomas More Jesuit Church and a retreat director at Ignatius House Jesuit Retreat Center in Atlanta, GA. He is the author of God Moments.

Prayer

God, who calls us to a life-changing mission:
Enflame our hearts with the desire to change the world with you,
to share our gifts and take part in your mission.
May we always respond to your invitation to love.
May our hearts be on fire with your love.

—Andy Otto

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Dear God,

I let go of my need to be perfect, and I let You fill me with Your perfect love.
I let go of my ideas of fulfillment, and I let You fill me with what I truly desire.
I let go of what I think of myself, and I let You define my worth.
I let go of what others think of me, and I let You tell me who I am to You.
I let go of my appearance, and I let You shine through me.
I let go of my unreasonable standards, and I let You work through me.
I let go of my will for my life, and I let You reveal Your plan for me.
I let go of all of my past sins, and I let You forgive me.
I let go of my reliance on myself, and I let You be my Redeemer.
I let go of how I view others, and I let You love them through me.

 —Kate Prain

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Leaving things behind

I spent a summer traveling through India with three shirts, three pairs of underwear, two pairs of pants, and an undersized pair of sandals. I washed clothes often and I never made choices about what to wear. I wasn’t uncomfortable. The simplicity was freeing. I left nearly everything back home.

I journeyed on with other things though, and still do. Some of them, more than material possessions, still feel impossible to leave behind. Resentment toward people who have hurt me. Guilt for people I’ve hurt. Attachments to technology and a lack of moderation. A deeper concern for how I look than how I feel.

These are roadblocks to a lasting relationship with Jesus. More than extra t-shirts or undersized sandals, these are the things I must give up. The sacrifice will pave the way for deeper holiness and strength, and will lead me to eternal life.

—Eric Immel, SJ, is the Associate Dean for Student Success at Arrupe College and an editor for The Jesuit Post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

Holy is Your Name

My soul is filled with joy
as I sing to God my savior:
you have looked upon your servant,
you have visited your people.

Refrain
And holy is your name through all generations!
Everlasting is your mercy to the people you have chosen,
and holy is your name.

I am lowly as a child,
but I know from this day forward
that my name will be remembered,
for all will call me blessed.

I proclaim the pow’r of God,
you do marvels for your servants;
though you scatter the proud hearted
and destroy the might of princes.

To the hungry you give food,
send the rich away empty.
In your mercy you are mindful
of the people you have chosen.

In your love you now fulfill
what you promised to your people.
I will praise you, Lord, my savior,
everlasting is your mercy.

—Lyrics of  Holy is Your Name, David Haas, © 1989 GIA Publications

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


The brightness lingered

He came when I was working in the garden. It was a bright day; I squinted to see him in the brightness.

He said: When your husband Zacharias returns from his priestly duty, you will conceive and bear a son. (I dared not breathe.)

He said: You must name him John. He will be called by God to announce the coming of the Messiah. (I drew a deep breath.)

He said: Zacharias will be mute for a time, because he doubted. (I smiled at this, knowing how stubborn Zacharias can be.)

He said: The Messiah will be born of your young cousin Mary. She will come to you in the spring. She will need your advice and comfort as she deals with her unexpected pregnancy.

I said: I will welcome her with joy.

He smiled and was gone. The brightness lingered.

—Barbara Lee is a spiritual director, an Ignatian Volunteer, and the author of God Isn’t Finished With Me Yet: Discovering the Spiritual Graces of Later Life published by Loyola Press

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Feast of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Luke 1:39-56

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.” And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name.

His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation. He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.”

And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


May 31, 2018

Feast of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Luke 1:39-56

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.” And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name.

His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation. He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.”

And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

The brightness lingered

He came when I was working in the garden. It was a bright day; I squinted to see him in the brightness.

He said: When your husband Zacharias returns from his priestly duty, you will conceive and bear a son. (I dared not breathe.)

He said: You must name him John. He will be called by God to announce the coming of the Messiah. (I drew a deep breath.)

He said: Zacharias will be mute for a time, because he doubted. (I smiled at this, knowing how stubborn Zacharias can be.)

He said: The Messiah will be born of your young cousin Mary. She will come to you in the spring. She will need your advice and comfort as she deals with her unexpected pregnancy.

I said: I will welcome her with joy.

He smiled and was gone. The brightness lingered.

—Barbara Lee is a spiritual director, an Ignatian Volunteer, and the author of God Isn’t Finished With Me Yet: Discovering the Spiritual Graces of Later Life published by Loyola Press

Prayer

Holy is Your Name

My soul is filled with joy
as I sing to God my savior:
you have looked upon your servant,
you have visited your people.

Refrain
And holy is your name through all generations!
Everlasting is your mercy to the people you have chosen,
and holy is your name.

I am lowly as a child,
but I know from this day forward
that my name will be remembered,
for all will call me blessed.

I proclaim the pow’r of God,
you do marvels for your servants;
though you scatter the proud hearted
and destroy the might of princes.

To the hungry you give food,
send the rich away empty.
In your mercy you are mindful
of the people you have chosen.

In your love you now fulfill
what you promised to your people.
I will praise you, Lord, my savior,
everlasting is your mercy.

—Lyrics of  Holy is Your Name, David Haas, © 1989 GIA Publications

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God, who calls us to a life-changing mission:
Enflame our hearts with the desire to change the world with you,
to share our gifts and take part in your mission.
May we always respond to your invitation to love.
May our hearts be on fire with your love.

—Andy Otto

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Invitation to commitment

Here we have a solemn moment where Jesus shares his forthcoming fate with the Twelve and James and John have the audacity to say, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” In its reading it seems they have ignored what their master just said. But Jesus responds with the freedom and availability he has shown to every person he encounters. What they want is to share in his glory. Jesus responds to them with an invitation to true commitment that might as well have come out of St. Ignatius’ Call of the King meditation: “Whoever would like to come with me is to labor with me, that following me in the pain, he may also follow me in the glory.”

All Christ-followers can indeed share in Christ’s glory, but it doesn’t come for free. It comes with a commitment to the challenges (and joys) of service and laying down one’s life for others.

How would you respond to Jesus’ invitation?

—Andy Otto is a pastoral associate at St. Thomas More Jesuit Church and a retreat director at Ignatius House Jesuit Retreat Center in Atlanta, GA. He is the author of God Moments.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Mark 10:32-45

They were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them; they were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. He took the twelve aside again and began to tell them what was to happen to him, saying, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and the scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles;they will mock him, and spit upon him, and flog him, and kill him; and after three days he will rise again.”

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to him and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” They replied, “We are able.”

Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them.

But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Invitation to commitment

Here we have a solemn moment where Jesus shares his forthcoming fate with the Twelve and James and John have the audacity to say, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” In its reading it seems they have ignored what their master just said. But Jesus responds with the freedom and availability he has shown to every person he encounters. What they want is to share in his glory. Jesus responds to them with an invitation to true commitment that might as well have come out of St. Ignatius’ Call of the King meditation: “Whoever would like to come with me is to labor with me, that following me in the pain, he may also follow me in the glory.”

All Christ-followers can indeed share in Christ’s glory, but it doesn’t come for free. It comes with a commitment to the challenges (and joys) of service and laying down one’s life for others.

How would you respond to Jesus’ invitation?

—Andy Otto is a pastoral associate at St. Thomas More Jesuit Church and a retreat director at Ignatius House Jesuit Retreat Center in Atlanta, GA. He is the author of God Moments.

Prayer

God, who calls us to a life-changing mission:
Enflame our hearts with the desire to change the world with you,
to share our gifts and take part in your mission.
May we always respond to your invitation to love.
May our hearts be on fire with your love.

—Andy Otto

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


May 30, 2018

Mark 10:32-45

They were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them; they were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. He took the twelve aside again and began to tell them what was to happen to him, saying, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and the scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles;they will mock him, and spit upon him, and flog him, and kill him; and after three days he will rise again.”

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to him and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” They replied, “We are able.”

Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them.

But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Invitation to commitment

Here we have a solemn moment where Jesus shares his forthcoming fate with the Twelve and James and John have the audacity to say, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” In its reading it seems they have ignored what their master just said. But Jesus responds with the freedom and availability he has shown to every person he encounters. What they want is to share in his glory. Jesus responds to them with an invitation to true commitment that might as well have come out of St. Ignatius’ Call of the King meditation: “Whoever would like to come with me is to labor with me, that following me in the pain, he may also follow me in the glory.”

All Christ-followers can indeed share in Christ’s glory, but it doesn’t come for free. It comes with a commitment to the challenges (and joys) of service and laying down one’s life for others.

How would you respond to Jesus’ invitation?

—Andy Otto is a pastoral associate at St. Thomas More Jesuit Church and a retreat director at Ignatius House Jesuit Retreat Center in Atlanta, GA. He is the author of God Moments.

Prayer

God, who calls us to a life-changing mission:
Enflame our hearts with the desire to change the world with you,
to share our gifts and take part in your mission.
May we always respond to your invitation to love.
May our hearts be on fire with your love.

—Andy Otto

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Prayer

Dear God,

I let go of my need to be perfect, and I let You fill me with Your perfect love.
I let go of my ideas of fulfillment, and I let You fill me with what I truly desire.
I let go of what I think of myself, and I let You define my worth.
I let go of what others think of me, and I let You tell me who I am to You.
I let go of my appearance, and I let You shine through me.
I let go of my unreasonable standards, and I let You work through me.
I let go of my will for my life, and I let You reveal Your plan for me.
I let go of all of my past sins, and I let You forgive me.
I let go of my reliance on myself, and I let You be my Redeemer.
I let go of how I view others, and I let You love them through me.

 —Kate Prain

 

 

 

 

 

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Leaving things behind

I spent a summer traveling through India with three shirts, three pairs of underwear, two pairs of pants, and an undersized pair of sandals. I washed clothes often and I never made choices about what to wear. I wasn’t uncomfortable. The simplicity was freeing. I left nearly everything back home.

I journeyed on with other things though, and still do. Some of them, more than material possessions, still feel impossible to leave behind. Resentment toward people who have hurt me. Guilt for people I’ve hurt. Attachments to technology and a lack of moderation. A deeper concern for how I look than how I feel.

These are roadblocks to a lasting relationship with Jesus. More than extra t-shirts or undersized sandals, these are the things I must give up. The sacrifice will pave the way for deeper holiness and strength, and will lead me to eternal life.

—Eric Immel, SJ, is the Associate Dean for Student Success at Arrupe College and an editor for The Jesuit Post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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