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June 30, 2018

MT 8: 5-17

When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, appealing to him and saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, in terrible distress.” And he said to him, “I will come and cure him.”

The centurion answered, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof; but only speak the word, and my servant will be healed. For I also am a man under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and the slave does it.”

When Jesus heard him, he was amazed and said to those who followed him, “Truly I tell you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith. I tell you, many will come from east and west and will eat with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, while the heirs of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you according to your faith.” And the servant was healed in that hour.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Asking for healing

There seem to be two sets of people in today’s Gospel reading: those who are healed of their afflictions and those who bring the sick to Jesus’ attention.  Jesus’ interaction with the centurion results in the physical healing of the man’s servant, and a powerful affirmation of faith from the Roman soldier.

There are times in our lives where we may play both of these roles in our relationship with God.  Sometimes we are in need of healing, mentally, physically, spiritually, or emotionally. Other times we may feel strong in our faith and seek out a deeper relationship with Christ.

What do we need to bring before God to ask for healing?  What is a way we can profess our faith today?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Prayer

Lord Jesus, you healed the centurion’s servant, Peter’s mother-in-law, and countless others who were brought to you.  Heal us of whatever causes us harm. Just as the centurion’s faith caused him to seek your healing of his servant, may our faith be strong as we bring the needs of our world before you.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord Jesus, you healed the centurion’s servant, Peter’s mother-in-law, and countless others who were brought to you.  Heal us of whatever causes us harm. Just as the centurion’s faith caused him to seek your healing of his servant, may our faith be strong as we bring the needs of our world before you.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Asking for healing

There seem to be two sets of people in today’s Gospel reading: those who are healed of their afflictions and those who bring the sick to Jesus’ attention.  Jesus’ interaction with the centurion results in the physical healing of the man’s servant, and a powerful affirmation of faith from the Roman soldier.

There are times in our lives where we may play both of these roles in our relationship with God.  Sometimes we are in need of healing, mentally, physically, spiritually, or emotionally. Other times we may feel strong in our faith and seek out a deeper relationship with Christ.

What do we need to bring before God to ask for healing?  What is a way we can profess our faith today?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


MT 8: 5-17

When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, appealing to him and saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, in terrible distress.” And he said to him, “I will come and cure him.”

The centurion answered, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof; but only speak the word, and my servant will be healed. For I also am a man under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and the slave does it.”

When Jesus heard him, he was amazed and said to those who followed him, “Truly I tell you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith. I tell you, many will come from east and west and will eat with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, while the heirs of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you according to your faith.” And the servant was healed in that hour.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Jesus, our brother,
You sometimes ask hard questions
and answers are not always easy.
But why would you ask questions at all?
You do not demand answers,
yet you invite and guide and love us
in ways that inflame a desire to respond.
Give us the grace to be courageous.
May we learn to listen, today,
to you and to ourselves and to others.
May our listening lead to loving, today.
And may our loving be the answer needed, today.

Amen.

—Carol Ackels

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Who do you say that I am?

Who do you say that I am? It is a question that echoes through the centuries. If I ask family and friends, their answer tells me something about me and them and us. If I ask Jesus, his answer tells me about me and him and us. When relationships are mutual, the question echoes back –“who do you say that I am?” – and I must answer. This question and its answer between people who love one another do not result in analytical data points. Rather our answers reveal who you are to me, and me to you, and us to us.

Jesus asks his friends – who do you say that I am? Peter answers: “You are the answer to our questions, the location of our hopes, the reason for our joys. You are the One we have longed for to help us and heal us. You, Jesus, are everything.” And I might imagine the smile on Jesus’ face, as he turns, looks at me and asks “and who do you say that I am?”

—Carol Ackels is director of the Ignatian Spirituality Institute and co-author of Finding Christ in the World, a twelve week Ignatian retreat.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, Apostles

Mt 16:13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”

Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


June 29, 2018

Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, Apostles

Mt 16:13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”

Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Who do you say that I am?

Who do you say that I am? It is a question that echoes through the centuries. If I ask family and friends, their answer tells me something about me and them and us. If I ask Jesus, his answer tells me about me and him and us. When relationships are mutual, the question echoes back –“who do you say that I am?” – and I must answer. This question and its answer between people who love one another do not result in analytical data points. Rather our answers reveal who you are to me, and me to you, and us to us.

Jesus asks his friends – who do you say that I am? Peter answers: “You are the answer to our questions, the location of our hopes, the reason for our joys. You are the One we have longed for to help us and heal us. You, Jesus, are everything.” And I might imagine the smile on Jesus’ face, as he turns, looks at me and asks “and who do you say that I am?”

—Carol Ackels is director of the Ignatian Spirituality Institute and co-author of Finding Christ in the World, a twelve week Ignatian retreat.

Prayer

Jesus, our brother,
You sometimes ask hard questions
and answers are not always easy.
But why would you ask questions at all?
You do not demand answers,
yet you invite and guide and love us
in ways that inflame a desire to respond.
Give us the grace to be courageous.
May we learn to listen, today,
to you and to ourselves and to others.
May our listening lead to loving, today.
And may our loving be the answer needed, today.

Amen.

—Carol Ackels

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


June 28, 2018

St. Irenaeus, Bishop and Martyr

Mt 7:21-29

“Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven. On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many deeds of power in your name?’

Then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; go away from me, you evildoers.’ “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and acts on them will be like a wise man who built his house on rock. The rain fell, the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on rock. And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not act on them will be like a foolish man who built his house on sand. The rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell—and great was its fall!” Now when Jesus had finished saying these things, the crowds were astounded at his teaching, for he taught them as one having authority, and not as their scribes.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

The temptation to build on sand

Build on rock or build on sand. I get it. There’s a choice we must make, whether to follow the Lord’s way, or the worldly way of sin, greed, self-absorption, and all those other little demons that entice me. But here’s the problem, Jesus. Of course I want to build on rock, and in many ways I do just that. But your imagery makes it sound deceptively simple, as if we will only have to make that sand or rock choice once in a lifetime, and then never have to worry about it again. But I feel like I must make that choice a lot. Almost every day I feel the subtle tug to build (or at least vacation for a while) on the sands of greed, self-absorption, meanness or dozens more demons.

Do you have your own characteristic, ongoing moments of temptation to build on sand?

—Chris Lowney is author of various books. His most recent is Make Today Matter: 10 Habits for a Better Life (and World) published by Loyola Press.

Prayer

Lord, help me to be a wiser builder, every day of my life. When I’m tempted to build something on the sands of temptation, remind me that I want to dwell on the solid rock that is following you.

—Chris Lowney

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


June 28, 2018

Mt 7:1-5

“Do not judge, so that you may not be judged. For with the judgment you make you will be judged, and the measure you give will be the measure you get. Why do you see the speck in your neighbor’s eye, but do not notice the log in your own eye?

Or how can you say to your neighbor, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ while the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your neighbor’s eye.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

How ridiculous we are to judge

What vivid imagery Jesus invokes in today’s Gospel reading!

As the son of a carpenter, perhaps His father asked for Jesus’ help one afternoon in toting some wood. We might imagine an adolescent Jesus proudly stepping up to the plate to haul the biggest board that he could muster – only to be rendered temporarily useless by the tiniest fraction – a mere splinter – of it.

I suspect that we’ve all been there and don’t need any help in conjuring up the pain. But a splinter in one’s eye … how does that even happen? And, who, having acquired a splinter in his eye, ever needed anyone else’s help to realize his predicament? (What could be more ridiculous than that?)

Well, this … says Jesus: a person with a wooden beam sticking out of his eye who takes the occasion to scrutinize someone else’s infirmity.

(Ludicrous, right?)

Precisely – just like judging another person.

—Corey Quinn is the president of De Smet Jesuit High School in St. Louis.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, help me to recognize the errors of my ways, or the splinters in my eye.  Give me the humility to respond to criticism and the strength to change my actions to be more in line with how you would like me to live.  Remind me that you alone are our judge. Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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June 30, 2018

MT 8: 5-17

When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, appealing to him and saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, in terrible distress.” And he said to him, “I will come and cure him.”

The centurion answered, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof; but only speak the word, and my servant will be healed. For I also am a man under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and the slave does it.”

When Jesus heard him, he was amazed and said to those who followed him, “Truly I tell you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith. I tell you, many will come from east and west and will eat with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, while the heirs of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you according to your faith.” And the servant was healed in that hour.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Asking for healing

There seem to be two sets of people in today’s Gospel reading: those who are healed of their afflictions and those who bring the sick to Jesus’ attention.  Jesus’ interaction with the centurion results in the physical healing of the man’s servant, and a powerful affirmation of faith from the Roman soldier.

There are times in our lives where we may play both of these roles in our relationship with God.  Sometimes we are in need of healing, mentally, physically, spiritually, or emotionally. Other times we may feel strong in our faith and seek out a deeper relationship with Christ.

What do we need to bring before God to ask for healing?  What is a way we can profess our faith today?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Prayer

Lord Jesus, you healed the centurion’s servant, Peter’s mother-in-law, and countless others who were brought to you.  Heal us of whatever causes us harm. Just as the centurion’s faith caused him to seek your healing of his servant, may our faith be strong as we bring the needs of our world before you.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord Jesus, you healed the centurion’s servant, Peter’s mother-in-law, and countless others who were brought to you.  Heal us of whatever causes us harm. Just as the centurion’s faith caused him to seek your healing of his servant, may our faith be strong as we bring the needs of our world before you.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Asking for healing

There seem to be two sets of people in today’s Gospel reading: those who are healed of their afflictions and those who bring the sick to Jesus’ attention.  Jesus’ interaction with the centurion results in the physical healing of the man’s servant, and a powerful affirmation of faith from the Roman soldier.

There are times in our lives where we may play both of these roles in our relationship with God.  Sometimes we are in need of healing, mentally, physically, spiritually, or emotionally. Other times we may feel strong in our faith and seek out a deeper relationship with Christ.

What do we need to bring before God to ask for healing?  What is a way we can profess our faith today?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


MT 8: 5-17

When he entered Capernaum, a centurion came to him, appealing to him and saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, in terrible distress.” And he said to him, “I will come and cure him.”

The centurion answered, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof; but only speak the word, and my servant will be healed. For I also am a man under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come,’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and the slave does it.”

When Jesus heard him, he was amazed and said to those who followed him, “Truly I tell you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith. I tell you, many will come from east and west and will eat with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven, while the heirs of the kingdom will be thrown into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

And to the centurion Jesus said, “Go; let it be done for you according to your faith.” And the servant was healed in that hour.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Jesus, our brother,
You sometimes ask hard questions
and answers are not always easy.
But why would you ask questions at all?
You do not demand answers,
yet you invite and guide and love us
in ways that inflame a desire to respond.
Give us the grace to be courageous.
May we learn to listen, today,
to you and to ourselves and to others.
May our listening lead to loving, today.
And may our loving be the answer needed, today.

Amen.

—Carol Ackels

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Who do you say that I am?

Who do you say that I am? It is a question that echoes through the centuries. If I ask family and friends, their answer tells me something about me and them and us. If I ask Jesus, his answer tells me about me and him and us. When relationships are mutual, the question echoes back –“who do you say that I am?” – and I must answer. This question and its answer between people who love one another do not result in analytical data points. Rather our answers reveal who you are to me, and me to you, and us to us.

Jesus asks his friends – who do you say that I am? Peter answers: “You are the answer to our questions, the location of our hopes, the reason for our joys. You are the One we have longed for to help us and heal us. You, Jesus, are everything.” And I might imagine the smile on Jesus’ face, as he turns, looks at me and asks “and who do you say that I am?”

—Carol Ackels is director of the Ignatian Spirituality Institute and co-author of Finding Christ in the World, a twelve week Ignatian retreat.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, Apostles

Mt 16:13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”

Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


June 29, 2018

Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, Apostles

Mt 16:13-19

Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”

Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Who do you say that I am?

Who do you say that I am? It is a question that echoes through the centuries. If I ask family and friends, their answer tells me something about me and them and us. If I ask Jesus, his answer tells me about me and him and us. When relationships are mutual, the question echoes back –“who do you say that I am?” – and I must answer. This question and its answer between people who love one another do not result in analytical data points. Rather our answers reveal who you are to me, and me to you, and us to us.

Jesus asks his friends – who do you say that I am? Peter answers: “You are the answer to our questions, the location of our hopes, the reason for our joys. You are the One we have longed for to help us and heal us. You, Jesus, are everything.” And I might imagine the smile on Jesus’ face, as he turns, looks at me and asks “and who do you say that I am?”

—Carol Ackels is director of the Ignatian Spirituality Institute and co-author of Finding Christ in the World, a twelve week Ignatian retreat.

Prayer

Jesus, our brother,
You sometimes ask hard questions
and answers are not always easy.
But why would you ask questions at all?
You do not demand answers,
yet you invite and guide and love us
in ways that inflame a desire to respond.
Give us the grace to be courageous.
May we learn to listen, today,
to you and to ourselves and to others.
May our listening lead to loving, today.
And may our loving be the answer needed, today.

Amen.

—Carol Ackels

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


June 28, 2018

St. Irenaeus, Bishop and Martyr

Mt 7:21-29

“Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven. On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many deeds of power in your name?’

Then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; go away from me, you evildoers.’ “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and acts on them will be like a wise man who built his house on rock. The rain fell, the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on rock. And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not act on them will be like a foolish man who built his house on sand. The rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell—and great was its fall!” Now when Jesus had finished saying these things, the crowds were astounded at his teaching, for he taught them as one having authority, and not as their scribes.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

The temptation to build on sand

Build on rock or build on sand. I get it. There’s a choice we must make, whether to follow the Lord’s way, or the worldly way of sin, greed, self-absorption, and all those other little demons that entice me. But here’s the problem, Jesus. Of course I want to build on rock, and in many ways I do just that. But your imagery makes it sound deceptively simple, as if we will only have to make that sand or rock choice once in a lifetime, and then never have to worry about it again. But I feel like I must make that choice a lot. Almost every day I feel the subtle tug to build (or at least vacation for a while) on the sands of greed, self-absorption, meanness or dozens more demons.

Do you have your own characteristic, ongoing moments of temptation to build on sand?

—Chris Lowney is author of various books. His most recent is Make Today Matter: 10 Habits for a Better Life (and World) published by Loyola Press.

Prayer

Lord, help me to be a wiser builder, every day of my life. When I’m tempted to build something on the sands of temptation, remind me that I want to dwell on the solid rock that is following you.

—Chris Lowney

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


June 28, 2018

Mt 7:1-5

“Do not judge, so that you may not be judged. For with the judgment you make you will be judged, and the measure you give will be the measure you get. Why do you see the speck in your neighbor’s eye, but do not notice the log in your own eye?

Or how can you say to your neighbor, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ while the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your neighbor’s eye.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

How ridiculous we are to judge

What vivid imagery Jesus invokes in today’s Gospel reading!

As the son of a carpenter, perhaps His father asked for Jesus’ help one afternoon in toting some wood. We might imagine an adolescent Jesus proudly stepping up to the plate to haul the biggest board that he could muster – only to be rendered temporarily useless by the tiniest fraction – a mere splinter – of it.

I suspect that we’ve all been there and don’t need any help in conjuring up the pain. But a splinter in one’s eye … how does that even happen? And, who, having acquired a splinter in his eye, ever needed anyone else’s help to realize his predicament? (What could be more ridiculous than that?)

Well, this … says Jesus: a person with a wooden beam sticking out of his eye who takes the occasion to scrutinize someone else’s infirmity.

(Ludicrous, right?)

Precisely – just like judging another person.

—Corey Quinn is the president of De Smet Jesuit High School in St. Louis.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, help me to recognize the errors of my ways, or the splinters in my eye.  Give me the humility to respond to criticism and the strength to change my actions to be more in line with how you would like me to live.  Remind me that you alone are our judge. Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!