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Prayer

Lord, comfort me in my disappointments and setbacks; grace me with the knowledge that these sufferings are sanctified by your suffering on the cross, and that resurrection with you awaits.

—Ken Weber

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Jesus present in our suffering

What does Jesus on the cross have to do with me? The cross is a sign of defeat, of pain, suffering and death. But because it’s Jesus on that cross, and because of what comes after the cross (i.e., Resurrection), the cross means something else. It is now a sign that our own defeat, suffering, pain and death are redeemed and made holy. Our disappointment and loneliness are part of the Christian life – are in fact sanctified and holy parts of our Christian life – by the very fact that Jesus, the Holy One, is with us in those experiences on the cross. Even His resurrected body carries his wounds, so there has to be something holy in them, and in ours!

Am I able to feel Jesus’ presence with me in my suffering?

—Ken Weber is a University Minister in the Department of Student Life and Ministry at Loyola University New Orleans.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


1 Cor 1:17-25

For Christ did not send me to baptize but to proclaim the gospel, and not with eloquent wisdom, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its power. For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written, “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart.”

Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.

For God’s foolishness is wiser than human wisdom, and God’s weakness is stronger than human strength.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


August 31, 2018

1 Cor 1:17-25

For Christ did not send me to baptize but to proclaim the gospel, and not with eloquent wisdom, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its power. For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written, “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart.”

Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.

For God’s foolishness is wiser than human wisdom, and God’s weakness is stronger than human strength.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Jesus present in our suffering

What does Jesus on the cross have to do with me? The cross is a sign of defeat, of pain, suffering and death. But because it’s Jesus on that cross, and because of what comes after the cross (i.e., Resurrection), the cross means something else. It is now a sign that our own defeat, suffering, pain and death are redeemed and made holy. Our disappointment and loneliness are part of the Christian life – are in fact sanctified and holy parts of our Christian life – by the very fact that Jesus, the Holy One, is with us in those experiences on the cross. Even His resurrected body carries his wounds, so there has to be something holy in them, and in ours!

Am I able to feel Jesus’ presence with me in my suffering?

—Ken Weber is a University Minister in the Department of Student Life and Ministry at Loyola University New Orleans.

Prayer

Lord, comfort me in my disappointments and setbacks; grace me with the knowledge that these sufferings are sanctified by your suffering on the cross, and that resurrection with you awaits.

—Ken Weber

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord Jesus,
as I begin this day
help me to pause 
and rest a moment in your love.

May all of my actions
spring forth from you,
and may I share this love
with all those I meet.

Use me as your instrument
to bring peace and love
into my relationships
and into my community.

Amen.

—Lauren Gaffey

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Begin by remembering that we are beloved

I have never accused St. Paul of being a man of few words.  As a lector, his writings always feel like huge run on sentences with lots of commas.  When reading, I tend to gloss over his introductions which set out who is writing and who is being written to.  For some reason, though, today’s introduction caught me. At the very beginning of his letter to the people in Corinth, rather than jumping right into business Paul reminds them of the very core of their identity, specifically “those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus.”

My days typically begin when I groggily stumble out of bed and pick up my phone to see what has happened in the world since I went to bed.  Checking my email and Instagram are such a habit that I do them almost entirely without thinking. What would my day look like if the first thing I did was remind myself–like Paul reminds the Corinthians–that I am a beloved child of God.  What difference would it make in my outlook on the day if I first rooted myself in my identity as a disciple?

I can ask myself the same question about my interactions with others.  Despite having some problems within the Corinthian community that he has to address later in his letter, he begins with the recognition that they are brothers and sisters in Christ, and wishes them them grace and peace of God.  What would my relationships look like if I began each encounter by reminding myself that I am speaking with one of God’s beloved children?

Maybe Paul’s introductions aren’t something I should be skipping over at all.

—Lauren Gaffey is the Program Director of Charis Ministries, a part of the Ignatian Young Adult Ministries outreach of the Office of Ignatian Spirituality.  She also works with Jesuit Connections in Chicago and other programs of the Midwest Jesuits.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


1 Cor 1:1-9

Paul, called to be an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, and our brother Sosthenes, To the church of God that is in Corinth, to those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, together with all those who in every place call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, both their Lord and ours: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I give thanks to my God always for you because of the grace of God that has been given you in Christ Jesus, for in every way you have been enriched in him, in speech and knowledge of every kind— just as the testimony of Christ has been strengthened among you— so that you are not lacking in any spiritual gift as you wait for the revealing of our Lord Jesus Christ.

He will also strengthen you to the end, so that you may be blameless on the day of our Lord Jesus Christ. God is faithful; by him you were called into the fellowship of his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


August 30, 2018

1 Cor 1:1-9

Paul, called to be an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, and our brother Sosthenes, To the church of God that is in Corinth, to those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, together with all those who in every place call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, both their Lord and ours: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I give thanks to my God always for you because of the grace of God that has been given you in Christ Jesus, for in every way you have been enriched in him, in speech and knowledge of every kind— just as the testimony of Christ has been strengthened among you— so that you are not lacking in any spiritual gift as you wait for the revealing of our Lord Jesus Christ.

He will also strengthen you to the end, so that you may be blameless on the day of our Lord Jesus Christ. God is faithful; by him you were called into the fellowship of his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Begin by remembering that we are beloved

I have never accused St. Paul of being a man of few words.  As a lector, his writings always feel like huge run on sentences with lots of commas.  When reading, I tend to gloss over his introductions which set out who is writing and who is being written to.  For some reason, though, today’s introduction caught me. At the very beginning of his letter to the people in Corinth, rather than jumping right into business Paul reminds them of the very core of their identity, specifically “those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus.”

My days typically begin when I groggily stumble out of bed and pick up my phone to see what has happened in the world since I went to bed.  Checking my email and Instagram are such a habit that I do them almost entirely without thinking. What would my day look like if the first thing I did was remind myself–like Paul reminds the Corinthians–that I am a beloved child of God.  What difference would it make in my outlook on the day if I first rooted myself in my identity as a disciple?

I can ask myself the same question about my interactions with others.  Despite having some problems within the Corinthian community that he has to address later in his letter, he begins with the recognition that they are brothers and sisters in Christ, and wishes them them grace and peace of God.  What would my relationships look like if I began each encounter by reminding myself that I am speaking with one of God’s beloved children?

Maybe Paul’s introductions aren’t something I should be skipping over at all.

—Lauren Gaffey is the Program Director of Charis Ministries, a part of the Ignatian Young Adult Ministries outreach of the Office of Ignatian Spirituality.  She also works with Jesuit Connections in Chicago and other programs of the Midwest Jesuits.

Prayer

Lord Jesus,
as I begin this day
help me to pause
and rest a moment in your love.

May all of my actions
spring forth from you,
and may I share this love
with all those I meet.

Use me as your instrument
to bring peace and love
into my relationships
and into my community.

Amen.

—Lauren Gaffey

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


August 29, 2018

Martyrdom of St. John the Baptist

Mark 6:17-29

For Herod himself had sent men who arrested John, bound him, and put him in prison on account of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because Herod had married her. For John had been telling Herod, “It is not lawful for you to have your brother’s wife.” And Herodias had a grudge against him, and wanted to kill him. But she could not, for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and he protected him. When he heard him, he was greatly perplexed; and yet he liked to listen to him.

But an opportunity came when Herod on his birthday gave a banquet for his courtiers and officers and for the leaders of Galilee. When his daughter Herodias came in and danced, she pleased Herod and his guests; and the king said to the girl, “Ask me for whatever you wish, and I will give it.” And he solemnly swore to her, “Whatever you ask me, I will give you, even half of my kingdom.” She went out and said to her mother, “What should I ask for?” She replied, “The head of John the baptizer.”

Immediately she rushed back to the king and requested, “I want you to give me at once the head of John the Baptist on a platter.” The king was deeply grieved; yet out of regard for his oaths and for the guests, he did not want to refuse her. Immediately the king sent a soldier of the guard with orders to bring John’s head. He went and beheaded him in the prison, brought his head on a platter, and gave it to the girl. Then the girl gave it to her mother. When his disciples heard about it, they came and took his body, and laid it in a tomb.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Affirming those “on the fence”

This story details a real train wreck. Herod displays all the emotional self-control of a young adolescent, whipped around by fear and insecurity, and blinded by desire – all ending in an entirely predictable tragedy.

I wonder how he went “off the rails.” Herod was certainly young and impressionable once. You probably also know some people who may not be showing the signs of heading towards a future as thoughtful, compassionate human beings – maybe potential Herods, maybe potential saints.

Let’s consider a person you know whose future seems “on the fence.” Where is there an opportunity to explicitly affirm the better angels of this person’s personality?

St. Ignatius called for us to seek out and affirm the good in others as a tool of spiritual progress, rather than jumping to point out errors (SE 22). What gets noticed and affirmed — grows.

—Michael Coffey is the Executive Director of Casa Romero Renewal Center, an Ignatian, urban, bilingual spirituality center in the central city of Milwaukee.

Prayer

As you contemplate the person you know who is “on the fence,” I invite you to pray with these lyrics from The Servant Song.

Will you let me be your servant
Let me be as Christ to you
Pray that I might have the grace
To let you be my servant too

We are pilgrims on the journey
We are travellers on the road
We are here to help each other
Walk the mile and bear the load

—Michael Coffey, song lyrics by Richard Gillard, © 1977, Scripture in Song.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

As you contemplate the person you know who is “on the fence,” I invite you to pray with these lyrics from The Servant Song.

Will you let me be your servant 
Let me be as Christ to you 
Pray that I might have the grace 
To let you be my servant too

We are pilgrims on the journey 
We are travellers on the road 
We are here to help each other 
Walk the mile and bear the load

—Michael Coffey, song lyrics by Richard Gillard, © 1977, Scripture in Song. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

Lord, comfort me in my disappointments and setbacks; grace me with the knowledge that these sufferings are sanctified by your suffering on the cross, and that resurrection with you awaits.

—Ken Weber

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Jesus present in our suffering

What does Jesus on the cross have to do with me? The cross is a sign of defeat, of pain, suffering and death. But because it’s Jesus on that cross, and because of what comes after the cross (i.e., Resurrection), the cross means something else. It is now a sign that our own defeat, suffering, pain and death are redeemed and made holy. Our disappointment and loneliness are part of the Christian life – are in fact sanctified and holy parts of our Christian life – by the very fact that Jesus, the Holy One, is with us in those experiences on the cross. Even His resurrected body carries his wounds, so there has to be something holy in them, and in ours!

Am I able to feel Jesus’ presence with me in my suffering?

—Ken Weber is a University Minister in the Department of Student Life and Ministry at Loyola University New Orleans.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


1 Cor 1:17-25

For Christ did not send me to baptize but to proclaim the gospel, and not with eloquent wisdom, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its power. For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written, “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart.”

Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.

For God’s foolishness is wiser than human wisdom, and God’s weakness is stronger than human strength.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


August 31, 2018

1 Cor 1:17-25

For Christ did not send me to baptize but to proclaim the gospel, and not with eloquent wisdom, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its power. For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written, “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart.”

Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.

For God’s foolishness is wiser than human wisdom, and God’s weakness is stronger than human strength.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Jesus present in our suffering

What does Jesus on the cross have to do with me? The cross is a sign of defeat, of pain, suffering and death. But because it’s Jesus on that cross, and because of what comes after the cross (i.e., Resurrection), the cross means something else. It is now a sign that our own defeat, suffering, pain and death are redeemed and made holy. Our disappointment and loneliness are part of the Christian life – are in fact sanctified and holy parts of our Christian life – by the very fact that Jesus, the Holy One, is with us in those experiences on the cross. Even His resurrected body carries his wounds, so there has to be something holy in them, and in ours!

Am I able to feel Jesus’ presence with me in my suffering?

—Ken Weber is a University Minister in the Department of Student Life and Ministry at Loyola University New Orleans.

Prayer

Lord, comfort me in my disappointments and setbacks; grace me with the knowledge that these sufferings are sanctified by your suffering on the cross, and that resurrection with you awaits.

—Ken Weber

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord Jesus,
as I begin this day
help me to pause 
and rest a moment in your love.

May all of my actions
spring forth from you,
and may I share this love
with all those I meet.

Use me as your instrument
to bring peace and love
into my relationships
and into my community.

Amen.

—Lauren Gaffey

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Begin by remembering that we are beloved

I have never accused St. Paul of being a man of few words.  As a lector, his writings always feel like huge run on sentences with lots of commas.  When reading, I tend to gloss over his introductions which set out who is writing and who is being written to.  For some reason, though, today’s introduction caught me. At the very beginning of his letter to the people in Corinth, rather than jumping right into business Paul reminds them of the very core of their identity, specifically “those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus.”

My days typically begin when I groggily stumble out of bed and pick up my phone to see what has happened in the world since I went to bed.  Checking my email and Instagram are such a habit that I do them almost entirely without thinking. What would my day look like if the first thing I did was remind myself–like Paul reminds the Corinthians–that I am a beloved child of God.  What difference would it make in my outlook on the day if I first rooted myself in my identity as a disciple?

I can ask myself the same question about my interactions with others.  Despite having some problems within the Corinthian community that he has to address later in his letter, he begins with the recognition that they are brothers and sisters in Christ, and wishes them them grace and peace of God.  What would my relationships look like if I began each encounter by reminding myself that I am speaking with one of God’s beloved children?

Maybe Paul’s introductions aren’t something I should be skipping over at all.

—Lauren Gaffey is the Program Director of Charis Ministries, a part of the Ignatian Young Adult Ministries outreach of the Office of Ignatian Spirituality.  She also works with Jesuit Connections in Chicago and other programs of the Midwest Jesuits.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


1 Cor 1:1-9

Paul, called to be an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, and our brother Sosthenes, To the church of God that is in Corinth, to those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, together with all those who in every place call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, both their Lord and ours: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I give thanks to my God always for you because of the grace of God that has been given you in Christ Jesus, for in every way you have been enriched in him, in speech and knowledge of every kind— just as the testimony of Christ has been strengthened among you— so that you are not lacking in any spiritual gift as you wait for the revealing of our Lord Jesus Christ.

He will also strengthen you to the end, so that you may be blameless on the day of our Lord Jesus Christ. God is faithful; by him you were called into the fellowship of his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


August 30, 2018

1 Cor 1:1-9

Paul, called to be an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, and our brother Sosthenes, To the church of God that is in Corinth, to those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints, together with all those who in every place call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, both their Lord and ours: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. I give thanks to my God always for you because of the grace of God that has been given you in Christ Jesus, for in every way you have been enriched in him, in speech and knowledge of every kind— just as the testimony of Christ has been strengthened among you— so that you are not lacking in any spiritual gift as you wait for the revealing of our Lord Jesus Christ.

He will also strengthen you to the end, so that you may be blameless on the day of our Lord Jesus Christ. God is faithful; by him you were called into the fellowship of his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Begin by remembering that we are beloved

I have never accused St. Paul of being a man of few words.  As a lector, his writings always feel like huge run on sentences with lots of commas.  When reading, I tend to gloss over his introductions which set out who is writing and who is being written to.  For some reason, though, today’s introduction caught me. At the very beginning of his letter to the people in Corinth, rather than jumping right into business Paul reminds them of the very core of their identity, specifically “those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus.”

My days typically begin when I groggily stumble out of bed and pick up my phone to see what has happened in the world since I went to bed.  Checking my email and Instagram are such a habit that I do them almost entirely without thinking. What would my day look like if the first thing I did was remind myself–like Paul reminds the Corinthians–that I am a beloved child of God.  What difference would it make in my outlook on the day if I first rooted myself in my identity as a disciple?

I can ask myself the same question about my interactions with others.  Despite having some problems within the Corinthian community that he has to address later in his letter, he begins with the recognition that they are brothers and sisters in Christ, and wishes them them grace and peace of God.  What would my relationships look like if I began each encounter by reminding myself that I am speaking with one of God’s beloved children?

Maybe Paul’s introductions aren’t something I should be skipping over at all.

—Lauren Gaffey is the Program Director of Charis Ministries, a part of the Ignatian Young Adult Ministries outreach of the Office of Ignatian Spirituality.  She also works with Jesuit Connections in Chicago and other programs of the Midwest Jesuits.

Prayer

Lord Jesus,
as I begin this day
help me to pause
and rest a moment in your love.

May all of my actions
spring forth from you,
and may I share this love
with all those I meet.

Use me as your instrument
to bring peace and love
into my relationships
and into my community.

Amen.

—Lauren Gaffey

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


August 29, 2018

Martyrdom of St. John the Baptist

Mark 6:17-29

For Herod himself had sent men who arrested John, bound him, and put him in prison on account of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because Herod had married her. For John had been telling Herod, “It is not lawful for you to have your brother’s wife.” And Herodias had a grudge against him, and wanted to kill him. But she could not, for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and he protected him. When he heard him, he was greatly perplexed; and yet he liked to listen to him.

But an opportunity came when Herod on his birthday gave a banquet for his courtiers and officers and for the leaders of Galilee. When his daughter Herodias came in and danced, she pleased Herod and his guests; and the king said to the girl, “Ask me for whatever you wish, and I will give it.” And he solemnly swore to her, “Whatever you ask me, I will give you, even half of my kingdom.” She went out and said to her mother, “What should I ask for?” She replied, “The head of John the baptizer.”

Immediately she rushed back to the king and requested, “I want you to give me at once the head of John the Baptist on a platter.” The king was deeply grieved; yet out of regard for his oaths and for the guests, he did not want to refuse her. Immediately the king sent a soldier of the guard with orders to bring John’s head. He went and beheaded him in the prison, brought his head on a platter, and gave it to the girl. Then the girl gave it to her mother. When his disciples heard about it, they came and took his body, and laid it in a tomb.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Affirming those “on the fence”

This story details a real train wreck. Herod displays all the emotional self-control of a young adolescent, whipped around by fear and insecurity, and blinded by desire – all ending in an entirely predictable tragedy.

I wonder how he went “off the rails.” Herod was certainly young and impressionable once. You probably also know some people who may not be showing the signs of heading towards a future as thoughtful, compassionate human beings – maybe potential Herods, maybe potential saints.

Let’s consider a person you know whose future seems “on the fence.” Where is there an opportunity to explicitly affirm the better angels of this person’s personality?

St. Ignatius called for us to seek out and affirm the good in others as a tool of spiritual progress, rather than jumping to point out errors (SE 22). What gets noticed and affirmed — grows.

—Michael Coffey is the Executive Director of Casa Romero Renewal Center, an Ignatian, urban, bilingual spirituality center in the central city of Milwaukee.

Prayer

As you contemplate the person you know who is “on the fence,” I invite you to pray with these lyrics from The Servant Song.

Will you let me be your servant
Let me be as Christ to you
Pray that I might have the grace
To let you be my servant too

We are pilgrims on the journey
We are travellers on the road
We are here to help each other
Walk the mile and bear the load

—Michael Coffey, song lyrics by Richard Gillard, © 1977, Scripture in Song.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

As you contemplate the person you know who is “on the fence,” I invite you to pray with these lyrics from The Servant Song.

Will you let me be your servant 
Let me be as Christ to you 
Pray that I might have the grace 
To let you be my servant too

We are pilgrims on the journey 
We are travellers on the road 
We are here to help each other 
Walk the mile and bear the load

—Michael Coffey, song lyrics by Richard Gillard, © 1977, Scripture in Song. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!