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Today’s Ignatian Message

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God, grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change; 
courage to change the things I can; 
and wisdom to know the difference…

—Reinhold Niebuhr

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Hope that requires a leap of faith

I’m privileged to share time with amazing folks through Ignatian Spirituality Project and Harmony, Hope & Healing, which offer spaces for people in recovery and experiencing homelessness to encounter God, community, and their true selves. Survivors of trauma, abuse, neglect, and self-harm tell their stories in hopes of experiencing healing and liberation.

As people share—about suffering, loss, shame, failure—every participant proclaims without hesitation their reliance on God. They sing about their dependence on their Savior. They work at their spiritual practice every single day, sometimes needing to begin again. They have hope – the kind that requires a real leap of faith. I wish I could say the same for myself some days.

If anyone is going to make it through the narrow gate described in today’s Gospel, I think it’s folks like these.

What can I learn from people who seem like the “last” according to the world?

—Katie Davis (MDiv, Loyola University Chicago) is a former Jesuit Volunteer/JVC Magis currently working as a Chaplain and Religious Studies teacher at St. Ignatius College Prep. She has served on the Advisory Board for Jesuit Connections and is a member of the Chicago Women’s Team for the Ignatian Spirituality Project. Katie preaches with the project Catholic Women Preach.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Alphonsus Rodriguez, SJ

Jesus went through one town and village after another, teaching as he made his way to Jerusalem.

Someone asked him, “Lord, will only a few be saved?” He said to them,“Strive to enter through the narrow door; for many, I tell you, will try to enter and will not be able. When once the owner of the house has got up and shut the door, and you begin to stand outside and to knock at the door, saying, ‘Lord, open to us,’ then in reply he will say to you, ‘I do not know where you come from.’ Then you will begin to say, ‘We ate and drank with you, and you taught in our streets.’

But he will say, ‘I do not know where you come from; go away from me, all you evildoers!’ There will be weeping and gnashing of teeth when you see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, and you yourselves thrown out. Then people will come from east and west, from north and south, and will eat in the kingdom of God. Indeed, some are last who will be first, and some are first who will be last.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


October 31, 2018

St. Alphonsus Rodriguez, SJ

Jesus went through one town and village after another, teaching as he made his way to Jerusalem.

Someone asked him, “Lord, will only a few be saved?” He said to them,“Strive to enter through the narrow door; for many, I tell you, will try to enter and will not be able. When once the owner of the house has got up and shut the door, and you begin to stand outside and to knock at the door, saying, ‘Lord, open to us,’ then in reply he will say to you, ‘I do not know where you come from.’ Then you will begin to say, ‘We ate and drank with you, and you taught in our streets.’

But he will say, ‘I do not know where you come from; go away from me, all you evildoers!’ There will be weeping and gnashing of teeth when you see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, and you yourselves thrown out. Then people will come from east and west, from north and south, and will eat in the kingdom of God. Indeed, some are last who will be first, and some are first who will be last.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Hope that requires a leap of faith

I’m privileged to share time with amazing folks through Ignatian Spirituality Project and Harmony, Hope & Healing, which offer spaces for people in recovery and experiencing homelessness to encounter God, community, and their true selves. Survivors of trauma, abuse, neglect, and self-harm tell their stories in hopes of experiencing healing and liberation.

As people share—about suffering, loss, shame, failure—every participant proclaims without hesitation their reliance on God. They sing about their dependence on their Savior. They work at their spiritual practice every single day, sometimes needing to begin again. They have hope – the kind that requires a real leap of faith. I wish I could say the same for myself some days.

If anyone is going to make it through the narrow gate described in today’s Gospel, I think it’s folks like these.

What can I learn from people who seem like the “last” according to the world?

—Katie Davis (MDiv, Loyola University Chicago) is a former Jesuit Volunteer/JVC Magis currently working as a Chaplain and Religious Studies teacher at St. Ignatius College Prep. She has served on the Advisory Board for Jesuit Connections and is a member of the Chicago Women’s Team for the Ignatian Spirituality Project. Katie preaches with the project Catholic Women Preach.

Prayer

God, grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change;
courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference…

—Reinhold Niebuhr

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful.
And kindle in them the fire of your love.
Send forth your Spirit and they shall be created.
And you will renew the face of the earth.

Lord,
by the light of the Holy Spirit
you have taught the hearts of your faithful.
In the same Spirit
help us to relish what is right
and always rejoice in your consolation.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

—Prayer to the Holy Spirit

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Growth through the Holy Spirit

Some may think that the Kingdom of God is a thing, a geographical domain like the worldly kingdoms we are familiar with. But in the Gospel reading today, Jesus suggests that the Kingdom of God is on a path. When the yeast is mixed with flour, it is on its way and develops the bread. Likewise, the seed dies and gives life to a tree. Therefore, the Kingdom of God is not stagnant, but it is built each day.

What is the attitude that the Lord asks us to have so that the Kingdom of God may grow and be bread for everyone and shelter for all? Perhaps Jesus is asking us to be open to the action of the Holy Spirit in our lives. Let us ask for the grace of being docile to the Holy Spirit who will make us grow and transform as we walk on a path towards holiness and fullness.

—Orlando Portalatin, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Central and Southern Province studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Lk 13:18-21

He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.”

And again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


October 30, 2018

Lk 13:18-21

He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.”

And again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Growth through the Holy Spirit

Some may think that the Kingdom of God is a thing, a geographical domain like the worldly kingdoms we are familiar with. But in the Gospel reading today, Jesus suggests that the Kingdom of God is on a path. When the yeast is mixed with flour, it is on its way and develops the bread. Likewise, the seed dies and gives life to a tree. Therefore, the Kingdom of God is not stagnant, but it is built each day.

What is the attitude that the Lord asks us to have so that the Kingdom of God may grow and be bread for everyone and shelter for all? Perhaps Jesus is asking us to be open to the action of the Holy Spirit in our lives. Let us ask for the grace of being docile to the Holy Spirit who will make us grow and transform as we walk on a path towards holiness and fullness.

—Orlando Portalatin, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Central and Southern Province studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful.
And kindle in them the fire of your love.
Send forth your Spirit and they shall be created.
And you will renew the face of the earth.

Lord,
by the light of the Holy Spirit
you have taught the hearts of your faithful.
In the same Spirit
help us to relish what is right
and always rejoice in your consolation.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

—Prayer to the Holy Spirit

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord Jesus, you have told us not to judge lest we be judged.  Open our hearts to meet all those we encounter with love and patience. Help us to forgive others for the small and large acts that have hurt us.  May we know that you love each of us, and always offer us the opportunity to turn back to you.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Today’s Ignatian Message

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

God, grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change; 
courage to change the things I can; 
and wisdom to know the difference…

—Reinhold Niebuhr

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Hope that requires a leap of faith

I’m privileged to share time with amazing folks through Ignatian Spirituality Project and Harmony, Hope & Healing, which offer spaces for people in recovery and experiencing homelessness to encounter God, community, and their true selves. Survivors of trauma, abuse, neglect, and self-harm tell their stories in hopes of experiencing healing and liberation.

As people share—about suffering, loss, shame, failure—every participant proclaims without hesitation their reliance on God. They sing about their dependence on their Savior. They work at their spiritual practice every single day, sometimes needing to begin again. They have hope – the kind that requires a real leap of faith. I wish I could say the same for myself some days.

If anyone is going to make it through the narrow gate described in today’s Gospel, I think it’s folks like these.

What can I learn from people who seem like the “last” according to the world?

—Katie Davis (MDiv, Loyola University Chicago) is a former Jesuit Volunteer/JVC Magis currently working as a Chaplain and Religious Studies teacher at St. Ignatius College Prep. She has served on the Advisory Board for Jesuit Connections and is a member of the Chicago Women’s Team for the Ignatian Spirituality Project. Katie preaches with the project Catholic Women Preach.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Alphonsus Rodriguez, SJ

Jesus went through one town and village after another, teaching as he made his way to Jerusalem.

Someone asked him, “Lord, will only a few be saved?” He said to them,“Strive to enter through the narrow door; for many, I tell you, will try to enter and will not be able. When once the owner of the house has got up and shut the door, and you begin to stand outside and to knock at the door, saying, ‘Lord, open to us,’ then in reply he will say to you, ‘I do not know where you come from.’ Then you will begin to say, ‘We ate and drank with you, and you taught in our streets.’

But he will say, ‘I do not know where you come from; go away from me, all you evildoers!’ There will be weeping and gnashing of teeth when you see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, and you yourselves thrown out. Then people will come from east and west, from north and south, and will eat in the kingdom of God. Indeed, some are last who will be first, and some are first who will be last.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


October 31, 2018

St. Alphonsus Rodriguez, SJ

Jesus went through one town and village after another, teaching as he made his way to Jerusalem.

Someone asked him, “Lord, will only a few be saved?” He said to them,“Strive to enter through the narrow door; for many, I tell you, will try to enter and will not be able. When once the owner of the house has got up and shut the door, and you begin to stand outside and to knock at the door, saying, ‘Lord, open to us,’ then in reply he will say to you, ‘I do not know where you come from.’ Then you will begin to say, ‘We ate and drank with you, and you taught in our streets.’

But he will say, ‘I do not know where you come from; go away from me, all you evildoers!’ There will be weeping and gnashing of teeth when you see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, and you yourselves thrown out. Then people will come from east and west, from north and south, and will eat in the kingdom of God. Indeed, some are last who will be first, and some are first who will be last.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Hope that requires a leap of faith

I’m privileged to share time with amazing folks through Ignatian Spirituality Project and Harmony, Hope & Healing, which offer spaces for people in recovery and experiencing homelessness to encounter God, community, and their true selves. Survivors of trauma, abuse, neglect, and self-harm tell their stories in hopes of experiencing healing and liberation.

As people share—about suffering, loss, shame, failure—every participant proclaims without hesitation their reliance on God. They sing about their dependence on their Savior. They work at their spiritual practice every single day, sometimes needing to begin again. They have hope – the kind that requires a real leap of faith. I wish I could say the same for myself some days.

If anyone is going to make it through the narrow gate described in today’s Gospel, I think it’s folks like these.

What can I learn from people who seem like the “last” according to the world?

—Katie Davis (MDiv, Loyola University Chicago) is a former Jesuit Volunteer/JVC Magis currently working as a Chaplain and Religious Studies teacher at St. Ignatius College Prep. She has served on the Advisory Board for Jesuit Connections and is a member of the Chicago Women’s Team for the Ignatian Spirituality Project. Katie preaches with the project Catholic Women Preach.

Prayer

God, grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change;
courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference…

—Reinhold Niebuhr

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful.
And kindle in them the fire of your love.
Send forth your Spirit and they shall be created.
And you will renew the face of the earth.

Lord,
by the light of the Holy Spirit
you have taught the hearts of your faithful.
In the same Spirit
help us to relish what is right
and always rejoice in your consolation.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

—Prayer to the Holy Spirit

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Growth through the Holy Spirit

Some may think that the Kingdom of God is a thing, a geographical domain like the worldly kingdoms we are familiar with. But in the Gospel reading today, Jesus suggests that the Kingdom of God is on a path. When the yeast is mixed with flour, it is on its way and develops the bread. Likewise, the seed dies and gives life to a tree. Therefore, the Kingdom of God is not stagnant, but it is built each day.

What is the attitude that the Lord asks us to have so that the Kingdom of God may grow and be bread for everyone and shelter for all? Perhaps Jesus is asking us to be open to the action of the Holy Spirit in our lives. Let us ask for the grace of being docile to the Holy Spirit who will make us grow and transform as we walk on a path towards holiness and fullness.

—Orlando Portalatin, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Central and Southern Province studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Lk 13:18-21

He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.”

And again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


October 30, 2018

Lk 13:18-21

He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.”

And again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Growth through the Holy Spirit

Some may think that the Kingdom of God is a thing, a geographical domain like the worldly kingdoms we are familiar with. But in the Gospel reading today, Jesus suggests that the Kingdom of God is on a path. When the yeast is mixed with flour, it is on its way and develops the bread. Likewise, the seed dies and gives life to a tree. Therefore, the Kingdom of God is not stagnant, but it is built each day.

What is the attitude that the Lord asks us to have so that the Kingdom of God may grow and be bread for everyone and shelter for all? Perhaps Jesus is asking us to be open to the action of the Holy Spirit in our lives. Let us ask for the grace of being docile to the Holy Spirit who will make us grow and transform as we walk on a path towards holiness and fullness.

—Orlando Portalatin, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Central and Southern Province studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful.
And kindle in them the fire of your love.
Send forth your Spirit and they shall be created.
And you will renew the face of the earth.

Lord,
by the light of the Holy Spirit
you have taught the hearts of your faithful.
In the same Spirit
help us to relish what is right
and always rejoice in your consolation.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

—Prayer to the Holy Spirit

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Lord Jesus, you have told us not to judge lest we be judged.  Open our hearts to meet all those we encounter with love and patience. Help us to forgive others for the small and large acts that have hurt us.  May we know that you love each of us, and always offer us the opportunity to turn back to you.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!