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Prayer

O Spirit of God, we ask you to help orient
all our actions by your inspirations,
carry them on by your gracious assistance,
that every prayer and work of ours
may always begin from you
and through you be happily ended.

Amen.

—A prayer for spiritual freedom published in Hearts on Fire: Praying with Jesuits

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Freedom to respond at once

I’m inspired by and also somewhat jealous of Peter, Andrew, James and John. I’m not jealous of their call to discipleship – I know that I (and you, too!) are called to discipleship. I’m jealous of their freedom.

My own response to God rarely, if ever, comes “at once” or “immediately.” Yet, upon Jesus’ invitation, they freely walk away from their former ways of defining themselves (their work and their paternal lineage) to reorient their lives around their relationship with God. I, on the other hand, tend to cling more tightly to my nets.

I’m currently making the Spiritual Exercises in their 19th Annotation form. In my prayer, “trust me” and “follow me” continue to surface. Day after day, I ask for the grace of freedom to respond like Peter, Andrew, James and John.

How is Jesus calling you today? What net(s) do you need to leave behind?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division and serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Andrew

Mt 4:18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.”

Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


November 30, 2018

St. Andrew

Mt 4:18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.”

Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Freedom to respond at once

I’m inspired by and also somewhat jealous of Peter, Andrew, James and John. I’m not jealous of their call to discipleship – I know that I (and you, too!) are called to discipleship. I’m jealous of their freedom.

My own response to God rarely, if ever, comes “at once” or “immediately.” Yet, upon Jesus’ invitation, they freely walk away from their former ways of defining themselves (their work and their paternal lineage) to reorient their lives around their relationship with God. I, on the other hand, tend to cling more tightly to my nets.

I’m currently making the Spiritual Exercises in their 19th Annotation form. In my prayer, “trust me” and “follow me” continue to surface. Day after day, I ask for the grace of freedom to respond like Peter, Andrew, James and John.

How is Jesus calling you today? What net(s) do you need to leave behind?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division and serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House.

Prayer

O Spirit of God, we ask you to help orient
all our actions by your inspirations,
carry them on by your gracious assistance,
that every prayer and work of ours
may always begin from you
and through you be happily ended.

Amen.

—A prayer for spiritual freedom published in Hearts on Fire: Praying with Jesuits

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Prayer to the Sacred Heart of Jesus

O most holy Heart of Jesus, fountain of every blessing,
I adore you, I love you and will a lively sorrow for my sins.
I offer you this poor heart of mine.
Make me humble, patient, pure, and wholly obedient to your will.
Grant, good Jesus, that I may live in you and for you.
Protect me in the midst of danger; comfort me in my afflictions;
give me health of body, assistance in my temporal needs,
your blessings on all that I do, and the grace of a holy death.
Within your heart I place my every care.
In every need let me come to you with humble trust saying,
Heart of Jesus, help me.
Amen.

—Traditional prayer

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Look to the heart of Jesus

We face times in our lives when we feel like we’re surrounded by armies and desolation is at hand. Maybe it’s not the Roman legions pounding on our gates. But desolation comes in many forms: depression, addiction, loneliness, hopelessness, and their allies. We each have faced them; we will again.

Today we remember Blessed Bernard Francis de Hoyos, SJ, an eighteenth century Jesuit. Known as Spain’s first “Apostle of the Sacred Heart”, de Hoyos died at age 24, from typhoid fever just after his thirty-day retreat. As we face desolation, now or in the future, let us be reminded to look to the heart of Jesus, to the compassionate found there for each one of us. In opening ourselves to this mercy, we find the greatest consolation, Jesus himself. As de Hoyos prayed frequently while dying, may we pray, “Oh, how good it is to dwell in the Heart of Jesus.”

—Mark Bartholet is a John Carroll University alumnus who coordinates the Contemplative Leaders in Action program and Catechesis of the Good Shepherd at St. Peter Catholic Church, the Jesuit parish in Charlotte, NC.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Blessed Bernardo de Hoyos, SJ

Lk 21: 20-28

“When you see Jerusalem surrounded by armies, then know that its desolation has come near. Then those in Judea must flee to the mountains, and those inside the city must leave it, and those out in the country must not enter it; for these are days of vengeance, as a fulfillment of all that is written.

Woe to those who are pregnant and to those who are nursing infants in those days! For there will be great distress on the earth and wrath against this people; they will fall by the edge of the sword and be taken away as captives among all nations; and Jerusalem will be trampled on by the Gentiles, until the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled.

“There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on the earth distress among nations confused by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will faint from fear and foreboding of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in a cloud’ with power and great glory. Now when these things begin to take place, stand up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


November 29, 2018

Blessed Bernardo de Hoyos, SJ

Lk 21: 20-28

“When you see Jerusalem surrounded by armies, then know that its desolation has come near. Then those in Judea must flee to the mountains, and those inside the city must leave it, and those out in the country must not enter it; for these are days of vengeance, as a fulfillment of all that is written.

Woe to those who are pregnant and to those who are nursing infants in those days! For there will be great distress on the earth and wrath against this people; they will fall by the edge of the sword and be taken away as captives among all nations; and Jerusalem will be trampled on by the Gentiles, until the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled.

“There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on the earth distress among nations confused by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will faint from fear and foreboding of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in a cloud’ with power and great glory. Now when these things begin to take place, stand up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Look to the heart of Jesus

We face times in our lives when we feel like we’re surrounded by armies and desolation is at hand. Maybe it’s not the Roman legions pounding on our gates. But desolation comes in many forms: depression, addiction, loneliness, hopelessness, and their allies. We each have faced them; we will again.

Today we remember Blessed Bernard Francis de Hoyos, SJ, an eighteenth century Jesuit. Known as Spain’s first “Apostle of the Sacred Heart”, de Hoyos died at age 24, from typhoid fever just after his thirty-day retreat. As we face desolation, now or in the future, let us be reminded to look to the heart of Jesus, to the compassionate found there for each one of us. In opening ourselves to this mercy, we find the greatest consolation, Jesus himself. As de Hoyos prayed frequently while dying, may we pray, “Oh, how good it is to dwell in the Heart of Jesus.”

—Mark Bartholet is a John Carroll University alumnus who coordinates the Contemplative Leaders in Action program and Catechesis of the Good Shepherd at St. Peter Catholic Church, the Jesuit parish in Charlotte, NC.

Prayer

Prayer to the Sacred Heart of Jesus

O most holy Heart of Jesus, fountain of every blessing,
I adore you, I love you and will a lively sorrow for my sins.
I offer you this poor heart of mine.
Make me humble, patient, pure, and wholly obedient to your will.
Grant, good Jesus, that I may live in you and for you.
Protect me in the midst of danger; comfort me in my afflictions;
give me health of body, assistance in my temporal needs,
your blessings on all that I do, and the grace of a holy death.
Within your heart I place my every care.
In every need let me come to you with humble trust saying,
Heart of Jesus, help me.
Amen.

—Traditional prayer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Jesus, we know that you are close to us in all our difficulties. Give us the faith to see your presence with us. We ask your special protection for all those around the world who are persecuted for their faith. Amen.

—Beth Franzosa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Jesus is with us, even in this

What an intense reading! Jesus speaks strongly and directly about betrayal and persecution that can seem far away to those of us leading comfortable lives today. If this situation seems far away to you, imagine how comforting this reading must have been to the early Christians who first read it. The evangelist wrote Jesus’ warning about the coming persecution to people who were very familiar with how this all had come to pass.

Imagine their relief, thinking, “Yes, Jesus told us he would be with us, even in this.” If you have experienced persecution and betrayal in your life because of your faith or your convictions, hear Jesus speaking to you here. If not, imagine Jesus speaking words like these about some of your greatest trials. How does it feel to hear Jesus knowing about the difficult times in your life and promising to be with you?

—Beth Franzosa teaches in the Religious Studies department at Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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Prayer

O Spirit of God, we ask you to help orient
all our actions by your inspirations,
carry them on by your gracious assistance,
that every prayer and work of ours
may always begin from you
and through you be happily ended.

Amen.

—A prayer for spiritual freedom published in Hearts on Fire: Praying with Jesuits

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Freedom to respond at once

I’m inspired by and also somewhat jealous of Peter, Andrew, James and John. I’m not jealous of their call to discipleship – I know that I (and you, too!) are called to discipleship. I’m jealous of their freedom.

My own response to God rarely, if ever, comes “at once” or “immediately.” Yet, upon Jesus’ invitation, they freely walk away from their former ways of defining themselves (their work and their paternal lineage) to reorient their lives around their relationship with God. I, on the other hand, tend to cling more tightly to my nets.

I’m currently making the Spiritual Exercises in their 19th Annotation form. In my prayer, “trust me” and “follow me” continue to surface. Day after day, I ask for the grace of freedom to respond like Peter, Andrew, James and John.

How is Jesus calling you today? What net(s) do you need to leave behind?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division and serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House.

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


St. Andrew

Mt 4:18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.”

Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


November 30, 2018

St. Andrew

Mt 4:18-22

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.”

Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Freedom to respond at once

I’m inspired by and also somewhat jealous of Peter, Andrew, James and John. I’m not jealous of their call to discipleship – I know that I (and you, too!) are called to discipleship. I’m jealous of their freedom.

My own response to God rarely, if ever, comes “at once” or “immediately.” Yet, upon Jesus’ invitation, they freely walk away from their former ways of defining themselves (their work and their paternal lineage) to reorient their lives around their relationship with God. I, on the other hand, tend to cling more tightly to my nets.

I’m currently making the Spiritual Exercises in their 19th Annotation form. In my prayer, “trust me” and “follow me” continue to surface. Day after day, I ask for the grace of freedom to respond like Peter, Andrew, James and John.

How is Jesus calling you today? What net(s) do you need to leave behind?

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division and serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House.

Prayer

O Spirit of God, we ask you to help orient
all our actions by your inspirations,
carry them on by your gracious assistance,
that every prayer and work of ours
may always begin from you
and through you be happily ended.

Amen.

—A prayer for spiritual freedom published in Hearts on Fire: Praying with Jesuits

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Prayer to the Sacred Heart of Jesus

O most holy Heart of Jesus, fountain of every blessing,
I adore you, I love you and will a lively sorrow for my sins.
I offer you this poor heart of mine.
Make me humble, patient, pure, and wholly obedient to your will.
Grant, good Jesus, that I may live in you and for you.
Protect me in the midst of danger; comfort me in my afflictions;
give me health of body, assistance in my temporal needs,
your blessings on all that I do, and the grace of a holy death.
Within your heart I place my every care.
In every need let me come to you with humble trust saying,
Heart of Jesus, help me.
Amen.

—Traditional prayer

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Look to the heart of Jesus

We face times in our lives when we feel like we’re surrounded by armies and desolation is at hand. Maybe it’s not the Roman legions pounding on our gates. But desolation comes in many forms: depression, addiction, loneliness, hopelessness, and their allies. We each have faced them; we will again.

Today we remember Blessed Bernard Francis de Hoyos, SJ, an eighteenth century Jesuit. Known as Spain’s first “Apostle of the Sacred Heart”, de Hoyos died at age 24, from typhoid fever just after his thirty-day retreat. As we face desolation, now or in the future, let us be reminded to look to the heart of Jesus, to the compassionate found there for each one of us. In opening ourselves to this mercy, we find the greatest consolation, Jesus himself. As de Hoyos prayed frequently while dying, may we pray, “Oh, how good it is to dwell in the Heart of Jesus.”

—Mark Bartholet is a John Carroll University alumnus who coordinates the Contemplative Leaders in Action program and Catechesis of the Good Shepherd at St. Peter Catholic Church, the Jesuit parish in Charlotte, NC.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Blessed Bernardo de Hoyos, SJ

Lk 21: 20-28

“When you see Jerusalem surrounded by armies, then know that its desolation has come near. Then those in Judea must flee to the mountains, and those inside the city must leave it, and those out in the country must not enter it; for these are days of vengeance, as a fulfillment of all that is written.

Woe to those who are pregnant and to those who are nursing infants in those days! For there will be great distress on the earth and wrath against this people; they will fall by the edge of the sword and be taken away as captives among all nations; and Jerusalem will be trampled on by the Gentiles, until the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled.

“There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on the earth distress among nations confused by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will faint from fear and foreboding of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in a cloud’ with power and great glory. Now when these things begin to take place, stand up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


November 29, 2018

Blessed Bernardo de Hoyos, SJ

Lk 21: 20-28

“When you see Jerusalem surrounded by armies, then know that its desolation has come near. Then those in Judea must flee to the mountains, and those inside the city must leave it, and those out in the country must not enter it; for these are days of vengeance, as a fulfillment of all that is written.

Woe to those who are pregnant and to those who are nursing infants in those days! For there will be great distress on the earth and wrath against this people; they will fall by the edge of the sword and be taken away as captives among all nations; and Jerusalem will be trampled on by the Gentiles, until the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled.

“There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on the earth distress among nations confused by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will faint from fear and foreboding of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. Then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in a cloud’ with power and great glory. Now when these things begin to take place, stand up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Look to the heart of Jesus

We face times in our lives when we feel like we’re surrounded by armies and desolation is at hand. Maybe it’s not the Roman legions pounding on our gates. But desolation comes in many forms: depression, addiction, loneliness, hopelessness, and their allies. We each have faced them; we will again.

Today we remember Blessed Bernard Francis de Hoyos, SJ, an eighteenth century Jesuit. Known as Spain’s first “Apostle of the Sacred Heart”, de Hoyos died at age 24, from typhoid fever just after his thirty-day retreat. As we face desolation, now or in the future, let us be reminded to look to the heart of Jesus, to the compassionate found there for each one of us. In opening ourselves to this mercy, we find the greatest consolation, Jesus himself. As de Hoyos prayed frequently while dying, may we pray, “Oh, how good it is to dwell in the Heart of Jesus.”

—Mark Bartholet is a John Carroll University alumnus who coordinates the Contemplative Leaders in Action program and Catechesis of the Good Shepherd at St. Peter Catholic Church, the Jesuit parish in Charlotte, NC.

Prayer

Prayer to the Sacred Heart of Jesus

O most holy Heart of Jesus, fountain of every blessing,
I adore you, I love you and will a lively sorrow for my sins.
I offer you this poor heart of mine.
Make me humble, patient, pure, and wholly obedient to your will.
Grant, good Jesus, that I may live in you and for you.
Protect me in the midst of danger; comfort me in my afflictions;
give me health of body, assistance in my temporal needs,
your blessings on all that I do, and the grace of a holy death.
Within your heart I place my every care.
In every need let me come to you with humble trust saying,
Heart of Jesus, help me.
Amen.

—Traditional prayer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Prayer

Jesus, we know that you are close to us in all our difficulties. Give us the faith to see your presence with us. We ask your special protection for all those around the world who are persecuted for their faith. Amen.

—Beth Franzosa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!


Jesus is with us, even in this

What an intense reading! Jesus speaks strongly and directly about betrayal and persecution that can seem far away to those of us leading comfortable lives today. If this situation seems far away to you, imagine how comforting this reading must have been to the early Christians who first read it. The evangelist wrote Jesus’ warning about the coming persecution to people who were very familiar with how this all had come to pass.

Imagine their relief, thinking, “Yes, Jesus told us he would be with us, even in this.” If you have experienced persecution and betrayal in your life because of your faith or your convictions, hear Jesus speaking to you here. If not, imagine Jesus speaking words like these about some of your greatest trials. How does it feel to hear Jesus knowing about the difficult times in your life and promising to be with you?

—Beth Franzosa teaches in the Religious Studies department at Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!