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August 2, 2018

St. Peter Faber, SJ

Mt 13:47-53

“Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a net that was thrown into the sea and caught fish of every kind; when it was full, they drew it ashore, sat down, and put the good into baskets but threw out the bad. So it will be at the end of the age. The angels will come out and separate the evil from the righteous and throw them into the furnace of fire, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. “Have you understood all this?” They answered, “Yes.” And he said to them, “Therefore every scribe who has been trained for the kingdom of heaven is like the master of a household who brings out of his treasure what is new and what is old.”

When Jesus had finished these parables, he left that place.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Bringing together the old and the new

The scribes Jesus refers to are the leaders in their faith communities who are charged with teaching both the old (the law and the prophets) and the new (the teachings of Jesus).  St. Peter Faber, SJ, whose feast we celebrate today, was one of St. Ignatius’ original companions who responded to this charge. His ministry occured in the midst of the Protestant Reformation and, seeing many errors in the state of the Catholic Church at the time, he dedicated himself to changing hearts one person at a time.  He looked at the “old” (focusing on a relationship with Christ) through the lens of the “new” (he was a master of leading people through the Spiritual Exercises).  

Are there things in our life that need to be looked at through a new lens?  Are we open to new ideas and ways of thinking to help us grow in our own relationships with Christ?

—Lauren Gaffey is the Program Director of Charis Ministries, a part of the Ignatian Young Adult Ministries outreach of the Office of Ignatian Spirituality.  She also works with Jesuit Connections in Chicago and other programs of the Midwest Jesuits.

Prayer

Father, Lord of heaven and earth, you revealed yourself to Peter Faber, your humble servant, in prayer and in the service of his neighbor. Grant that we may find you and love you in everything and in every person. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Joseph N. Tylenda, SJ, published in Jesuit Saints and Martyrs, 2nd Edition © 1998 Loyola Press

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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August 2, 2018

St. Peter Faber, SJ

Mt 13:47-53

“Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a net that was thrown into the sea and caught fish of every kind; when it was full, they drew it ashore, sat down, and put the good into baskets but threw out the bad. So it will be at the end of the age. The angels will come out and separate the evil from the righteous and throw them into the furnace of fire, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. “Have you understood all this?” They answered, “Yes.” And he said to them, “Therefore every scribe who has been trained for the kingdom of heaven is like the master of a household who brings out of his treasure what is new and what is old.”

When Jesus had finished these parables, he left that place.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Bringing together the old and the new

The scribes Jesus refers to are the leaders in their faith communities who are charged with teaching both the old (the law and the prophets) and the new (the teachings of Jesus).  St. Peter Faber, SJ, whose feast we celebrate today, was one of St. Ignatius’ original companions who responded to this charge. His ministry occured in the midst of the Protestant Reformation and, seeing many errors in the state of the Catholic Church at the time, he dedicated himself to changing hearts one person at a time.  He looked at the “old” (focusing on a relationship with Christ) through the lens of the “new” (he was a master of leading people through the Spiritual Exercises).  

Are there things in our life that need to be looked at through a new lens?  Are we open to new ideas and ways of thinking to help us grow in our own relationships with Christ?

—Lauren Gaffey is the Program Director of Charis Ministries, a part of the Ignatian Young Adult Ministries outreach of the Office of Ignatian Spirituality.  She also works with Jesuit Connections in Chicago and other programs of the Midwest Jesuits.

Prayer

Father, Lord of heaven and earth, you revealed yourself to Peter Faber, your humble servant, in prayer and in the service of his neighbor. Grant that we may find you and love you in everything and in every person. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Joseph N. Tylenda, SJ, published in Jesuit Saints and Martyrs, 2nd Edition © 1998 Loyola Press

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!