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July 3, 2018

St. Thomas, Apostle

John 20:24-29

But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.” Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Peace in unexpected ways

I often behave like Thomas when I’m grieving. No consoling words from trusted friends can snap me out of my rut. I can relate to Thomas’ over-the-top insistence that he “see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side” before coming to belief.  Like Thomas, I require divine intervention to pull me back to hope.

Luckily, today’s Gospel reading reminds us that Jesus is always ready to meet us in our grief. Jesus may not fulfill our exact demands in the way he does Thomas’, but he is waiting to bring us the peace for which we long. May we have the eyes of faith to see him!

Has there been a time when Jesus invited you out of grief and into peace in unexpected ways?

—Jake Braithwaite, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Northeast Province studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Lord, grant that I may see thee more clearly,
love thee more dearly,
follow thee more nearly.

—Spiritual Exercises #104, St. Ignatius of Loyola

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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July 3, 2018

St. Thomas, Apostle

John 20:24-29

But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.” Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Peace in unexpected ways

I often behave like Thomas when I’m grieving. No consoling words from trusted friends can snap me out of my rut. I can relate to Thomas’ over-the-top insistence that he “see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side” before coming to belief.  Like Thomas, I require divine intervention to pull me back to hope.

Luckily, today’s Gospel reading reminds us that Jesus is always ready to meet us in our grief. Jesus may not fulfill our exact demands in the way he does Thomas’, but he is waiting to bring us the peace for which we long. May we have the eyes of faith to see him!

Has there been a time when Jesus invited you out of grief and into peace in unexpected ways?

—Jake Braithwaite, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Northeast Province studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

Lord, grant that I may see thee more clearly,
love thee more dearly,
follow thee more nearly.

—Spiritual Exercises #104, St. Ignatius of Loyola

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!