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May 1, 2018

St. Joseph the Worker

John 14:27-31A

Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid.

You heard me say to you, ‘I am going away, and I am coming to you.’ If you loved me, you would rejoice that I am going to the Father, because the Father is greater than I. And now I have told you this before it occurs, so that when it does occur, you may believe. I will no longer talk much with you, for the ruler of this world is coming. He has no power over me; but I do as the Father has commanded me, so that the world may know that I love the Father. Rise, let us be on our way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

A peace we do not understand

The Gospel today seems nearly poetic until you pause to think about where it falls in the narrative. Soon, Jesus will be betrayed, arrested, put on trial, condemned and killed. Knowing of all of that, Jesus says to his disciples: “Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid.”

He calls them to peace. It’s not a peace of this world, and it’s not a peace they understand. They don’t yet comprehend the Resurrection or God’s plan. But then again, do we?

St. Joseph didn’t understand the plans that God had for him. He didn’t understand why he was called to take Mary into his home and raise her child. But he trusted. His silent example captures “the peace” in God’s plan—even when the plan is beyond our grasp.

Where are we invited into the “peace of Christ” rather than the worry over the future?

—Colten Biro, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the USA Central and Southern Province in First Studies at Saint Louis University. He is a frequent contributor to The Jesuit Post.

Prayer

Lord,
Like St. Joseph, you call me to live and to work,
often not knowing your plans.
Help me, to follow his example,
to work and live untroubled and unafraid.
Help me, Lord, to hold more firmly onto Your peace,
a peace I do not understand, but a peace I trust,
because that peace comes from You.
Amen.

—Colten Biro, SJ

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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May 1, 2018

St. Joseph the Worker

John 14:27-31A

Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid.

You heard me say to you, ‘I am going away, and I am coming to you.’ If you loved me, you would rejoice that I am going to the Father, because the Father is greater than I. And now I have told you this before it occurs, so that when it does occur, you may believe. I will no longer talk much with you, for the ruler of this world is coming. He has no power over me; but I do as the Father has commanded me, so that the world may know that I love the Father. Rise, let us be on our way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

A peace we do not understand

The Gospel today seems nearly poetic until you pause to think about where it falls in the narrative. Soon, Jesus will be betrayed, arrested, put on trial, condemned and killed. Knowing of all of that, Jesus says to his disciples: “Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid.”

He calls them to peace. It’s not a peace of this world, and it’s not a peace they understand. They don’t yet comprehend the Resurrection or God’s plan. But then again, do we?

St. Joseph didn’t understand the plans that God had for him. He didn’t understand why he was called to take Mary into his home and raise her child. But he trusted. His silent example captures “the peace” in God’s plan—even when the plan is beyond our grasp.

Where are we invited into the “peace of Christ” rather than the worry over the future?

—Colten Biro, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the USA Central and Southern Province in First Studies at Saint Louis University. He is a frequent contributor to The Jesuit Post.

Prayer

Lord,
Like St. Joseph, you call me to live and to work,
often not knowing your plans.
Help me, to follow his example,
to work and live untroubled and unafraid.
Help me, Lord, to hold more firmly onto Your peace,
a peace I do not understand, but a peace I trust,
because that peace comes from You.
Amen.

—Colten Biro, SJ

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!