Apple  Android
Strake Jesuit Prayer App

May 26, 2017

St. Philip Neri

Jn 16: 20-23

Very truly, I tell you, you will weep and mourn, but the world will rejoice; you will have pain, but your pain will turn into joy. When a woman is in labor, she has pain, because her hour has come. But when her child is born, she no longer remembers the anguish because of the joy of having brought a human being into the world. So you have pain now; but I will see you again, and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy from you.

On that day you will ask nothing of me. Very truly, I tell you, if you ask anything of the Father in my name, he will give it to you.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

An Easter People

Christians are fundamentally an “Easter People.” The Resurrection lies central to the mystery of our faith and the grounding of our daily lives.

Yet, in a world which so often lacks joy and hope, the Resurrection can seem far away. For example, the coverage of politics—on both sides of the aisle—makes it feel as if we are in a continual, hopeless fight.

But, we are an Easter People. Jesus calls us to something deeper than a blind optimism. In today’s Gospel, we hear the words “anguish” and “pain” interwoven with “joy.”

How can that be?

The answer lies in the Christ we see after the Resurrection—a Christ glorified, but still bearing the wounds of the Passion. The cost of following always remains, but that cost is always less than the Glory of God. It is by seeking the Glory of God that we find our joy and hope.

—Colten Biro, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic of the Jesuits USA Central and Southern Province; he is currently studying English at St. Louis University.

Prayer

We are an Easter People and Alleluia is our song! We are not looking for a shallow joy but rather a joy that comes from faith, that grows through unselfish love, that respects the fundamental duty of love of neighbour, without which it would be unbecoming to speak of Joy.

—St. John Paul II

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





Submit a Prayer Request

Archives

May 26, 2017

St. Philip Neri

Jn 16: 20-23

Very truly, I tell you, you will weep and mourn, but the world will rejoice; you will have pain, but your pain will turn into joy. When a woman is in labor, she has pain, because her hour has come. But when her child is born, she no longer remembers the anguish because of the joy of having brought a human being into the world. So you have pain now; but I will see you again, and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy from you.

On that day you will ask nothing of me. Very truly, I tell you, if you ask anything of the Father in my name, he will give it to you.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

An Easter People

Christians are fundamentally an “Easter People.” The Resurrection lies central to the mystery of our faith and the grounding of our daily lives.

Yet, in a world which so often lacks joy and hope, the Resurrection can seem far away. For example, the coverage of politics—on both sides of the aisle—makes it feel as if we are in a continual, hopeless fight.

But, we are an Easter People. Jesus calls us to something deeper than a blind optimism. In today’s Gospel, we hear the words “anguish” and “pain” interwoven with “joy.”

How can that be?

The answer lies in the Christ we see after the Resurrection—a Christ glorified, but still bearing the wounds of the Passion. The cost of following always remains, but that cost is always less than the Glory of God. It is by seeking the Glory of God that we find our joy and hope.

—Colten Biro, S.J. is a Jesuit scholastic of the Jesuits USA Central and Southern Province; he is currently studying English at St. Louis University.

Prayer

We are an Easter People and Alleluia is our song! We are not looking for a shallow joy but rather a joy that comes from faith, that grows through unselfish love, that respects the fundamental duty of love of neighbour, without which it would be unbecoming to speak of Joy.

—St. John Paul II

 

 

 

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!