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November 20, 2017

Lk 18:35-43

As he approached Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging. When he heard a crowd going by, he asked what was happening. They told him, “Jesus of Nazareth is passing by.” Then he shouted, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Those who were in front sternly ordered him to be quiet; but he shouted even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!”

Jesus stood still and ordered the man to be brought to him; and when he came near, he asked him, “What do you want me to do for you?” He said, “Lord, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Receive your sight; your faith has saved you.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him, glorifying God; and all the people, when they saw it, praised God.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Asking for what we lack

This is the second reflection I’ve written on this Gospel for this site. If you receive these reflections through your inbox, perhaps you noticed. Last Monday’s reflection was meant for today. I submitted the wrong one. Checking the app that morning, I thought, “Oh no! How could this happen? We have to fix this before everyone sees it!”

Then, I thought of today’s Scripture. (Again.) The blind man is aware of what he lacks, and he asks Jesus, in front of everyone, for what he’s missing. I, on the other hand, don’t want to be lacking anything, and as a people-pleasing perfectionist, I certainly don’t want people to know when I make a mistake.

So, (again), I imagined Jesus asking, “What do you want me to do for you?”

I ask for the grace I seek, a grace which I spend most of my time pretending I don’t need, “Lord, let me see that it is okay to not have it all together all the time.”

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division; she serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House and the Advisory Board of Jesuit Connections.

Prayer

Open my eyes, Lord.
Help me to see your face.
Open my eyes, Lord.
Help me to see.

—Open My Eyes, © 1988, 1998, 2001 Jesse Manibusan, published by Spirit&Song, a division of OCP

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!

St. Ignatius’s First Principle and Foundation says “The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God, who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit.” One of the ways in which we respond to the love God has given us is through prayer, not only personal prayer but community prayer as well. The Pastoral Ministry Center invites members of our Strake Jesuit Community to share their prayers with us: their concerns, joys, thanksgivings, so that we may walk with them in all these times of their lives.





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November 20, 2017

Lk 18:35-43

As he approached Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging. When he heard a crowd going by, he asked what was happening. They told him, “Jesus of Nazareth is passing by.” Then he shouted, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Those who were in front sternly ordered him to be quiet; but he shouted even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!”

Jesus stood still and ordered the man to be brought to him; and when he came near, he asked him, “What do you want me to do for you?” He said, “Lord, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Receive your sight; your faith has saved you.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him, glorifying God; and all the people, when they saw it, praised God.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Asking for what we lack

This is the second reflection I’ve written on this Gospel for this site. If you receive these reflections through your inbox, perhaps you noticed. Last Monday’s reflection was meant for today. I submitted the wrong one. Checking the app that morning, I thought, “Oh no! How could this happen? We have to fix this before everyone sees it!”

Then, I thought of today’s Scripture. (Again.) The blind man is aware of what he lacks, and he asks Jesus, in front of everyone, for what he’s missing. I, on the other hand, don’t want to be lacking anything, and as a people-pleasing perfectionist, I certainly don’t want people to know when I make a mistake.

So, (again), I imagined Jesus asking, “What do you want me to do for you?”

I ask for the grace I seek, a grace which I spend most of my time pretending I don’t need, “Lord, let me see that it is okay to not have it all together all the time.”

—Lauren Hackman-Brooks is a Chaplain in University Ministry at Loyola University Chicago – Health Sciences Division; she serves on the Board of Directors at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House and the Advisory Board of Jesuit Connections.

Prayer

Open my eyes, Lord.
Help me to see your face.
Open my eyes, Lord.
Help me to see.

—Open My Eyes, © 1988, 1998, 2001 Jesse Manibusan, published by Spirit&Song, a division of OCP

 

Please share the Good Word with your friends!